Publications by authors named "Seda Tasir Yilmaz"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Behçet's: A Disease or a Syndrome? Answer from an Expression Profiling Study.

PLoS One 2016 18;11(2):e0149052. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Department of Pediatrics, TOBB University of Economics and Technology Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing, multisystemic inflammatory disorder with unanswered questions regarding its etiology/pathogenesis and classification. Distinct manifestation based subsets, pronounced geographical variations in expression, and discrepant immunological abnormalities raised the question whether Behçet's is "a disease or a syndrome". To answer the preceding question we aimed to display and compare the molecular mechanisms underlying distinct subsets of BD. For this purpose, the expression data of the gene expression profiling and association study on BD by Xavier et al (2013) was retrieved from GEO database and reanalysed by gene expression data analysis/visualization and bioinformatics enrichment tools. There were 15 BD patients (B) and 14 controls (C). Three subsets of BD patients were generated: MB (isolated mucocutaneous manifestations, n = 7), OB (ocular involvement, n = 4), and VB (large vein thrombosis, n = 4). Class comparison analyses yielded the following numbers of differentially expressed genes (DEGs); B vs C: 4, MB vs C: 5, OB vs C: 151, VB vs C: 274, MB vs OB: 215, MB vs VB: 760, OB vs VB: 984. Venn diagram analysis showed that there were no common DEGs in the intersection "MB vs C" ∩ "OB vs C" ∩ "VB vs C". Cluster analyses successfully clustered distinct expressions of BD. During gene ontology term enrichment analyses, categories with relevance to IL-8 production (MB vs C) and immune response to microorganisms (OB vs C) were differentially enriched. Distinct subsets of BD display distinct expression profiles and different disease associated pathways. Based on these clear discrepancies, the designation as "Behçet's syndrome" (BS) should be encouraged and future research should take into consideration the immunogenetic heterogeneity of BS subsets. Four gene groups, namely, negative regulators of inflammation (CD69, CLEC12A, CLEC12B, TNFAIP3), neutrophil granule proteins (LTF, OLFM4, AZU1, MMP8, DEFA4, CAMP), antigen processing and presentation proteins (CTSS, ERAP1), and regulators of immune response (LGALS2, BCL10, ITCH, CEACAM8, CD36, IL8, CCL4, EREG, NFKBIZ, CCR2, CD180, KLRC4, NFAT5) appear to be instrumental in BS immunopathogenesis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0149052PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758705PMC
July 2016

Matrilin-3 as a putative effector of C-type natriuretic peptide signaling during TGF-β induced chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

Mol Biol Rep 2014 Sep 17;41(9):5549-55. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) signaling has been implicated as an important regulator of chondrogenic differentiation during endochondral bone development. This preliminary study further investigated the putative effectors and/or targets of CNP signaling in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously characterized human trabecular bone derived MSCs were induced either with only TGF-β1 or with a combination of TGF-β1 and CNP in micromass culture for 10 or 20 days. Genome wide gene expression profile changes in between these two groups were analyzed on day-10 or day-20 of culture. Results revealed that there were only 7 genes, whose expression change was fourfolds or higher in TGF-β1 and CNP fed group in comparison to only TGF-β1 fed group. The up-regulated genes included matrilin-3 (MATN3), engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1), CD24, and DCN1, defective in cullin neddylation 1, domain containing 1 (DCUN1D1). The down-regulated genes, on the other hand, included LIM domain kinase 2 (LIMK2), Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1, and guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 12 (GNG12). The up-regulation of MATN3 was confirmed on the basis of RT-PCR. The known literature on both CNP signaling and MATN3 function in chondrogenesis match with each other and suggest MATN3 as a putative effector and/or target of CNP signaling during this process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-014-3448-3DOI Listing
September 2014

Mutations in TMC1 contribute significantly to nonsyndromic autosomal recessive sensorineural hearing loss: a report of five novel mutations.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2009 May 1;73(5):699-705. Epub 2009 Feb 1.

Division of Clinical Molecular Pathology and Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Genome wide homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K arrays revealed the DFNB7/11 locus including the TMC1 gene in 5 of 35 Turkish families with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic severe to profound congenital or prelingual-onset sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Additional 51 families were later screened for co-segregation of the locus with the phenotype using microsatellite markers. GJB2 and mtDNA A1555G mutations were negative in probands from each family. Mutation analysis was performed in families showing co-segregation of autosomal recessive SNHL with haplotypes at the DFNB7/11 locus. A total of six different mutations in seven families were identified, including novel missense alterations, p.G444R (c.1330G>A), p.R445C (c.1333C>T), and p.I677T (c.2030T>C), one novel splice site mutation IVS6+2 T>A (c.64+2T>A), and a novel large deletion of approximately 31kb at the 3' region of the gene including exons 19-24, as well as a previously reported nonsense mutation, p.R34X (c.100C>T). All identified mutations co-segregated with autosomal recessive SNHL in all families and were not found in Turkish hearing controls. These results expand the mutation spectrum of TMC1 with five novel mutations and provide data for the significant contribution of TMC1 mutations in hearing loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2009.01.005DOI Listing
May 2009

Homozygous mutations in fibroblast growth factor 3 are associated with a new form of syndromic deafness characterized by inner ear agenesis, microtia, and microdontia.

Am J Hum Genet 2007 Feb 27;80(2):338-44. Epub 2006 Dec 27.

Division of Clinical Molecular Pathology and Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

We identified nine individuals from three unrelated Turkish families with a unique autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by type I microtia, microdontia, and profound congenital deafness associated with a complete absence of inner ear structures (Michel aplasia). We later demonstrated three different homozygous mutations (p.S156P, p.R104X, and p.V206SfsX117) in the fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3) gene in affected members of these families, cosegregating with the autosomal recessive transmission as a completely penetrant phenotype. These findings demonstrate the involvement of FGF3 mutations in a human malformation syndrome for the first time and contribute to our understanding of the role this gene plays in embryonic development. Of particular interest is that the development of the inner ear is completely disturbed at a very early stage--or the otic vesicle is not induced at all--in all of the affected individuals who carried two mutant FGF3 alleles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/510920DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1785350PMC
February 2007