Publications by authors named "Sebnem Garip Ustaoglu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging-A Novel Approach to Monitor Bio Molecular Changes in Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Brain Sci 2021 Jul 12;11(7). Epub 2021 Jul 12.

Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation (QF), Doha P.O. Box 34110, Qatar.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be defined as a disorder in the function of the brain after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head, or penetrating head injury. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can cause devastating effects, such as the initiation of long-term neurodegeneration in brain tissue. In the current study, the effects of mTBI were investigated on rat brain regions; cortex (Co) and corpus callosum (CC) after 24 h (subacute trauma) by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC studies showed the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the cortex brain region of mTBI rats. Moreover, staining of myelin basic protein presented the shearing of axons in CC region in the same group of animals. According to FTIR imaging results, total protein and lipid content significantly decreased in both Co and CC regions in mTBI group compared to the control. Due to this significant decrease in both lipid and protein content, remarkable consistency in lipid/protein band ratio in mTBI and control group, was observed. Significant decrease in methyl content and a significant increase in olefinic content were observed in Co and CC regions of mTBI rat brain tissues. Classification amongst distinguishable groups was performed using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering (HCA). This study established the prospective of FTIR imaging for assessing biochemical changes due to mTBI with high sensitivity, precision and high-resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070918DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8307811PMC
July 2021

Biomolecular changes and subsequent time-dependent recovery in hippocampal tissue after experimental mild traumatic brain injury.

Sci Rep 2021 06 14;11(1):12468. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Altinbas University, Bakirkoy, Istanbul, Turkey.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the main cause of disability and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years. Elucidation of the molecular and structural alterations in brain tissue due to TBI is crucial to understand secondary and long-term effects after traumatic brain injury, and to develop and apply the correct therapies. In the current study, the molecular effects of TBI were investigated in rat brain at 24 h and 1 month after the injury to determine acute and chronic effects, respectively by Fourier transform infrared imaging. This study reports the time-dependent contextual and structural effects of TBI on hippocampal brain tissue. A mild form of TBI was induced in 11-week old male Sprague Dawley rats by weight drop. Band area and intensity ratios, band frequency and bandwidth values of specific spectral bands showed that TBI causes significant structural and contextual global changes including decrease in carbonyl content, unsaturated lipid content, lipid acyl chain length, membrane lipid order, total protein content, lipid/protein ratio, besides increase in membrane fluidity with an altered protein secondary structure and metabolic activity in hippocampus 24 h after injury. However, improvement and/or recovery effects in these parameters were observed at one month after TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-92015-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8203626PMC
June 2021

Side-Effects of Convulsive Seizures and Anti-Seizure Therapy on Bone in a Rat Model of Epilepsy.

Appl Spectrosc 2018 May 12;72(5):689-705. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

6 Department of Biological Sciences, 187458 Middle East Technical University , Ankara, Turkey.

The severe sole effects of seizures on the cortical part of bone were reported in our previous study. However, the side effects of anti-epileptic drug therapy on bones has not been differentiated from the effects of the convulsive seizures, yet. This study provides the first report on differentiation of the effects of seizures and carbamazepine (a widely used antiepileptic drug) therapy on bones; 50 mg/kg/day drug was given to genetically induced absence epileptic rats for five weeks. Distinct bone regions including cortical, trabecular, and growth plate in each of tibia, femur, and spine tissues were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging and Vickers microhardness test. Blood levels of vitamin D and bone turnover biomarkers were also measured. According to the FT-IR imaging results, both seizure and carbamazepine-treated groups, more dominantly the drug-treated group, had lower mineral content with altered collagen crosslinks and higher crystallinity, implying reduced bone strength. Lower microhardness values also supported lower mechanical strength in bones. The most affected bone tissue and region from seizures and treatment was found as the spine and cortical, respectively. While there was a reduction in vitamin D and calcium levels in both seizure and carbamazepin-treated groups, significantly elevated PTH and bone turnover biomarkers were only seen in the drug-treated group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003702817734617DOI Listing
May 2018
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