Publications by authors named "Sean Iain Docking"

6 Publications

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Physical Activity and Investigation With Magnetic Resonance Imaging Partly Explain Variability in the Prevalence of Patellar Tendon Abnormalities: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis of Imaging Studies in Asymptomatic Individuals.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2021 05 28;51(5):216-231. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Objective: To estimate the pooled prevalence of, and factors associated with, the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities observed on imaging in people without symptoms.

Design: Systematic review with stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Literature Search: We searched Embase, Scopus, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science from 1980 to August 2020.

Study Selection Criteria: We included studies that reported the prevalence of asymptomatic patellar tendon abnormalities on imaging. We excluded studies of participants with current tendon pain, a history of tendon pain, or other systemic conditions.

Data Synthesis: Stratification and meta-regression of studies based on study-level descriptive statistics (mean age, body mass index, proportion of female participants, physical activity participation, imaging modality) were performed using a random-effects model to account for between-study heterogeneity. Risk of bias was assessed using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale.

Results: Meta-analysis of 64 studies (7125 limbs from 4616 participants) found significant between-study heterogeneity (I≥90%, <.01), which precluded a summary prevalence estimate. Heterogeneity was partially explained by studies that included participants who were physically active and studies that assessed tendon abnormalities using magnetic resonance imaging compared to ultrasound (<.05). Mean age, body mass index, proportion of female participants, and sample size did not explain the remaining heterogeneity.

Conclusion: There was substantial variability in the reported prevalence of asymptomatic patellar tendon abnormalities. A clear and valid method is needed to assess and report the presence of patellar tendon abnormalities to increase research capacity and establish the clinical value of imaging the patellar tendon. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2021.10054DOI Listing
May 2021

Explaining Variability in the Prevalence of Achilles Tendon Abnormalities: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis of Imaging Studies in Asymptomatic Individuals.

J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2021 05 28;51(5):232-252. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of, and factors associated with, Achilles tendon abnormalities observed on imaging in asymptomatic individuals.

Design: Systematic review with stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Literature Search: Embase, Scopus, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science were searched from 1980 to August 2020.

Study Selection Criteria: We included studies that reported the prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities, observed with any imaging modality, in an asymptomatic population. We excluded studies if participant mean age was younger than 12 years or if participants had current/previous lower-limb tendon injuries/symptoms or other systemic conditions.

Data Synthesis: Random-effects proportion meta-analysis was used to estimate prevalence. We used meta-regression for continuous variables (mean age and body mass index [BMI], sample size, proportion of female participants) and stratified categorical variables (imaging modality and participation in physical activity) to explain between-study heterogeneity.

Results: We included 91 studies (10 156 limbs, 5841 participants). The prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities on imaging ranged from 0% to 80% per participant. Between-study heterogeneity was high (I>90%, <.001), precluding data pooling. Between-study heterogeneity was partly explained by participant mean BMI (slope, 2.8% per 1-unit increase in BMI; 95% confidence interval: 0.57%, 5.03%; = .015) and participation in physical activity per limb, and mean age of 40 years old or older ( = .022) per participant.

Conclusion: There was substantial variability in the prevalence of Achilles tendon abnormalities on imaging in asymptomatic individuals. Higher prevalence of abnormalities was associated with older age (40 years old or older), higher BMI, and participation in physical activity. A large proportion of heterogeneity remains unaccounted for, likely due to variations in abnormality definitions and study design. .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2021.9970DOI Listing
May 2021

Improved reporting of overuse injuries and health problems in sport: an update of the Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center questionnaires.

Br J Sports Med 2020 Apr 14;54(7):390-396. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, The Netherlands.

In 2013, the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Injury Questionnaire (OSTRC-O) was developed to record the magnitude, symptoms and consequences of overuse injuries in sport. Shortly afterwards, a modified version of the OSTRC-O was developed to capture all types of injuries and illnesses-The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Questionnaire on Health Problems (OSTRC-H). Since then, users from a range of research and clinical environments have identified areas in which these questionnaires may be improved. Therefore, the structure and content of the questionnaires was reviewed by an international panel consisting of the original developers, other user groups and experts in sports epidemiology and applied statistical methodology. Following a review panel meeting in October 2017, several changes were made to the questionnaires, including minor wording alterations, changes to the content of one question and the addition of questionnaire logic. In this paper, we present the updated versions of the questionnaires (OSTRC-O2 and OSTRC-H2), assess the likely impact of the updates on future data collection and discuss practical issues related to application of the questionnaires. We believe this update will improve respondent adherence and improve the quality of collected data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2019-101337DOI Listing
April 2020

Identification and differentiation of gluteus medius tendon pathology using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

Musculoskelet Sci Pract 2019 06 7;41:1-5. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, 2617, Australia; Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, 2617, Australia.

Background: It has been suggested that imaging findings play a role in directing treatment for Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome. Structural diagnoses associated with Greater Trochanter Pain Syndrome include gluteal tendinosis, and partial- or full-thickness gluteal tendon tears. However, few studies have compared imaging to confirmed tendon pathology observed during surgery.

Objective: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging to identify the presence of a pathological gluteus medius tendon in comparison to surgical and histological findings.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Methods: 26 participants undergoing gluteal tendon reconstruction surgery or hip arthroplasty were included. Prior to surgery, participants underwent both magnetic resonance (MR) (n = 23) and ultrasound (US) (n = 25) imaging. A radiologist (MR) and nuclear physicians (US) classified the gluteus medius tendon as normal, tendinosis (no tear), partial-thickness tear, or full-thickness tear.

Results: Ultrasound identified 17 out of the 19 pathological gluteus medius tendons correctly. However, 5 of the 6 normal tendons were incorrectly identified as exhibiting pathology on ultrasound. Magnetic resonance rated 11 out of 17 pathological tendons as abnormal, with 4 out of 6 normal tendons identified correctly. Both imaging modalities were poor at identifying and differentiating between tendinosis and partial-thickness tears.

Conclusion: Both imaging modalities showed a reasonable ability to identify tendon pathology. While limited by sample size, these early findings suggest that both imaging modalities may be limited in identifying specific pathoanatomical diagnoses, such as partial-thickness tears. These limitations may misdirect treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msksp.2019.01.011DOI Listing
June 2019

Efficacy of heavy eccentric calf training for treating mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Br J Sports Med 2019 Sep 13;53(17):1070-1077. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

School of Physiotherapy, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of heavy eccentric calf training (HECT) in comparison with natural history, traditional physiotherapy, sham interventions or other exercise interventions for improvements in pain and function in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy.

Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted as per the PRISMA guidelines.

Data Sources: PUBMED, CINAHL (Ovid) and CINAHL (EBSCO) were searched from inception until 24 September 2018.

Eligibility Criteria: Randomised controlled trials comparing HECT to natural history, sham exercise, traditional physiotherapy and other exercise interventions were included. Primary outcome assessing pain and function was the Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles.

Results: Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. This review suggests HECT may be superior to both natural history, mean difference (MD) (95% CI) of 20.6 (11.7 to 29.5, one study) and traditional physiotherapy, MD (95% CI) of 17.70 (3.75 to 31.66, two studies). Following removal of one study, at high risk of bias, due to pre-planned sensitivity analysis, this review suggests HECT may be inferior to other exercise interventions, MD (95% CI) of -5.65 (-10.51 to -0.79, three studies). However, this difference is unlikely to be clinically significant.

Conclusion: Current evidence suggests that HECT may be superior to natural history and traditional physiotherapy while HECT may be inferior to other exercise interventions. However, due to methodological limitations, small sample size and a lack of data we are unable to be confident in the results of the estimate of the effect, as the true effect is likely to be substantially different.

Systematic Review Registry: PROSPERO registration number: CRD4201804493 PROTOCOL REFERENCE: This protocol has been published open access: Murphy M, Travers MJ, Gibson, W. Is heavy eccentric calf training superior to natural history, sham rehabilitation, traditional physiotherapy and other exercise interventions for pain and function in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy? 2018; 7: 58.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2018-099934DOI Listing
September 2019

Adaptation of the pathological tendon: you cannot trade in for a new one, but perhaps you don't need to?

Br J Sports Med 2018 May 19;52(10):622-623. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

La Trobe Sports and Exercise Medicine (LASEM) Research Centre, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-097325DOI Listing
May 2018
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