Publications by authors named "Se Kyoung Lee"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Peroxiredoxin-mediated disulfide bond formation is required for nucleocytoplasmic translocation and secretion of HMGB1 in response to inflammatory stimuli.

Redox Biol 2019 06 15;24:101203. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, South Korea; Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, South Korea; Institute for Immunology and Immunological Diseases, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, South Korea; Center for Nanomedicine, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Seoul 03722, South Korea. Electronic address:

The nuclear protein HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) is secreted by monocytes-macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli and serves as a danger-associated molecular pattern. Acetylation and phosphorylation of HMGB1 are implicated in the regulation of its nucleocytoplasmic translocation for secretion, although inflammatory stimuli are known to induce HO production. Here we show that HO-induced oxidation of HMGB1, which results in the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys and Cys, is necessary and sufficient for its nucleocytoplasmic translocation and secretion. The oxidation is catalyzed by peroxiredoxin I (PrxI) and PrxII, which are first oxidized by HO and then transfer their disulfide oxidation state to HMGB1. The disulfide form of HMGB1 showed higher affinity for nuclear exportin CRM1 compared with the reduced form. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HMGB1 secretion was greatly attenuated in macrophages derived from PrxI or PrxII knockout mice, as was the LPS-induced increase in serum HMGB1 levels.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2019.101203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6482348PMC
June 2019

Circadian Oscillation of Sulfiredoxin in the Mitochondria.

Mol Cell 2015 Aug 30;59(4):651-63. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea. Electronic address:

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) released from mitochondria regulates various cell signaling pathways. Given that H2O2-eliminating enzymes such as peroxiredoxin III (PrxIII) are abundant in mitochondria, however, it has remained unknown how such release can occur. Active PrxIII-SH undergoes reversible inactivation via hyperoxidation to PrxIII-SO2, which is then reduced by sulfiredoxin. We now show that the amounts of PrxIII-SO2 and sulfiredoxin undergo antiphasic circadian oscillation in the mitochondria of specific tissues of mice maintained under normal conditions. Cytosolic sulfiredoxin was found to be imported into the mitochondria via a mechanism that requires formation of a disulfide-linked complex with heat shock protein 90, which is promoted by H2O2 released from mitochondria. The imported sulfiredoxin is degraded by Lon in a manner dependent on PrxIII hyperoxidation state. The coordinated import and degradation of sulfiredoxin provide the basis for sulfiredoxin oscillation and consequent PrxIII-SO2 oscillation in mitochondria and likely result in an oscillatory H2O2 release.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2015.06.031DOI Listing
August 2015

Sestrins activate Nrf2 by promoting p62-dependent autophagic degradation of Keap1 and prevent oxidative liver damage.

Cell Metab 2013 Jan 27;17(1):73-84. Epub 2012 Dec 27.

Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.

Sestrins (Sesns) protect cells from oxidative stress. The mechanism underlying the antioxidant effect of Sesns has remained unknown, however. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway provides cellular defense against oxidative stress by controlling the expression of antioxidant enzymes. We now show that Sesn1 and Sesn2 interact with the Nrf2 suppressor Keap1, the autophagy substrate p62, and the ubiquitin ligase Rbx1 and that the antioxidant function of Sesns is mediated through activation of Nrf2 in a manner reliant on p62-dependent autophagic degradation of Keap1. Sesn2 was upregulated in the liver of mice subjected to fasting or subsequent refeeding with a high-carbohydrate, fat-free diet, whereas only refeeding promoted Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation, because only refeeding induced p62 expression. Ablation of Sesn2 blocked Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation induced by refeeding and thereby increased the susceptibility of the liver to oxidative damage resulting from the acute stimulation of lipogenesis associated with refeeding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2012.12.002DOI Listing
January 2013

Invasive pleomorphic lobular carcinoma of the breast: clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis compared with invasive ductal carcinoma.

J Breast Cancer 2012 Sep 28;15(3):313-9. Epub 2012 Sep 28.

Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: Invasive pleomorphic lobular carcinoma (IPLC) is a very rare and distinct morphological variant of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), characterized by nuclear atypia and pleomorphism contrasted with the cytologic uniformity of ILC. This study evaluated clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of IPLC compared with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 35 patients with IPLC and 6,184 patients with IDC, not otherwise specified. We compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, relapse-free survival (RFS) and disease specific survival (DSS) of patients who were surgically treated between January 1997 and December 2010.

Results: Patients with IPLC presented at an older age with larger tumor size, worse histologic grade, higher rates of N3 stage, more multifocal/multicentric tumors, and more nipple-areolar complex involvement than those of patients with IDC. During the follow-up period, the IPLC group experienced five cases (14.3%) of disease recurrence and three cases (8.6%) of disease specific mortality compared with 637 cases (10.4%) of recurrence and 333 cases (5.4%) of disease specific mortality in the IDC group. Univariate analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method revealed that the IPLC group showed a significantly poorer prognosis than that of the IDC group (RFS, p=0.008; DSS, p<0.001). However, after adjusting for clinicopathologic factors, a multivariate analysis showed no statistical differences in RFS (p=0.396) and DSS (p=0.168) between the IPLC and the IDC groups.

Conclusion: Our data suggest that patients with IPLC present with poor prognostic factors such as large tumor size, poor histologic grade and advanced stage at diagnosis. These aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics may result in poor clinical outcomes. Although our study could not link IPLC histology to poor prognosis, considering the aggressive characteristics of IPLC, early detection and considerate treatment, including proper surgical and adjuvant intervention, could be helpful for disease progression and survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4048/jbc.2012.15.3.313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3468785PMC
September 2012

Feedback control of adrenal steroidogenesis via H2O2-dependent, reversible inactivation of peroxiredoxin III in mitochondria.

Mol Cell 2012 Jun;46(5):584-94

Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

Certain members of the peroxiredoxin (Prx) family undergo inactivation through hyperoxidation of the catalytic cysteine to sulfinic acid during catalysis and are reactivated by sulfiredoxin; however, the physiological significance of this reversible regulatory process is unclear. We now show that PrxIII in mouse adrenal cortex is inactivated by H(2)O(2) produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes during corticosterone production stimulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone. Inactivation of PrxIII triggers a sequence of events including accumulation of H(2)O(2), activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, suppression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein synthesis, and inhibition of steroidogenesis. Interestingly, levels of inactivated PrxIII, activated p38, and sulfiredoxin display circadian oscillations. Steroidogenic tissue-specific ablation of sulfiredoxin in mice resulted in the persistent accumulation of inactive PrxIII and suppression of the adrenal circadian rhythm of corticosterone production. The coupling of CYP11B1 activity to PrxIII inactivation provides a feedback regulatory mechanism for steroidogenesis that functions independently of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2012.05.030DOI Listing
June 2012

Protein kinase Cα protects against multidrug resistance in human colon cancer cells.

Mol Cells 2012 Jul 23;34(1):61-9. Epub 2012 May 23.

School of Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea.

Multidrug resistance is the phenomenon by which, after exposure to a single chemotherapeutic agent, cancer cells evade the agent's cytotoxic effects as well as become resistant to several classes of diverse drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that contribute to drug resistance via a n ATP - dependent drug efflux pump. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prominent ABC superfamily protein encoded by the mdr gene which has the ability to mediate the cellular extrusion of xenobiotics and anticancer drugs from tumor cells. Exclusively expressed P-gp cells from the human colon cancer HCT15/DOX line showed resistance to doxorubicin while parental HCT15 cells treated with doxorubicin displayed typical signs of apoptosis. In order to verify the hypothesis that expression of MDR is controlled in part, by protein kinase C (PKC), expression patterns of different PKC isoforms were examined in both cell lines. Of the PKC isoforms evaluated, the membrane translocation and expression levels of PKCα were strikingly increased in HCT15/DOX cells. PKCα reversed doxorubicin-induced apoptosis through the scavenging of ROS as well as inhibition of PARP cleavage. In addition, inhibition of PKCα with Go6976, a specific inhibitor of classical PKC, led to reduced MDR expression and increased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Knockdown of PKCα by siRNA diminished the protective effects of PKCα for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that over-expression and activity of PKCα is closely associated with the regulation of the MDR phenotype in human colon cancer HCT15 cells and provided insight into a new strategy for inhibiting doxorubicin resistance in human cancers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-0087-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3887773PMC
July 2012

Peroxiredoxin III and sulfiredoxin together protect mice from pyrazole-induced oxidative liver injury.

Antioxid Redox Signal 2012 Nov 31;17(10):1351-61. Epub 2012 May 31.

Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

Aims: To define the mechanisms underlying pyrazole-induced oxidative stress and the protective role of peroxiredoxins (Prxs) and sulfiredoxin (Srx) against such stress.

Results: Pyrazole increased Srx expression in the liver of mice in a nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent manner and induced Srx translocation from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Pyrazole also induced the expression of CYP2E1, a primary reactive oxygen species (ROS) source for ethanol-induced liver injury, in ER and mitochondria. However, increased CYP2E1 levels only partially accounted for the pyrazole-mediated induction of Srx, prompting the investigation of CYP2E1-independent ROS generation downstream of pyrazole. Indeed, pyrazole increased ER stress, which is known to elevate mitochondrial ROS. In addition, pyrazole up-regulated CYP2E1 to a greater extent in mitochondria than in ER. Accordingly, among Prxs I to IV, PrxIII, which is localized to mitochondria, was preferentially hyperoxidized in the liver of pyrazole-treated mice. Pyrazole-induced oxidative damage to the liver was greater in PrxIII(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Such damage was also increased in Srx(-/-) mice treated with pyrazole, underscoring the role of Srx as the guardian of PrxIII.

Innovation: The roles of Prxs, Srx, and ER stress have not been previously studied in relation to pyrazole toxicity.

Conclusion: The concerted action of PrxIII and Srx is important for protection against pyrazole-induced oxidative stress arising from the convergent induction of CYP2E1-derived and ER stress-derived ROS in mitochondria.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ars.2011.4334DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437045PMC
November 2012

Concerted action of sulfiredoxin and peroxiredoxin I protects against alcohol-induced oxidative injury in mouse liver.

Hepatology 2011 Mar 11;53(3):945-53. Epub 2011 Feb 11.

Department of Life Science, Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

Unlabelled: Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are peroxidases that catalyze the reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The active site cysteine residue of members of the 2-Cys Prx subgroup (Prx I to IV) of Prxs is hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO(2) ) during catalysis with concomitant loss of peroxidase activity. Reactivation of the hyperoxidized Prx is catalyzed by sulfiredoxin (Srx). Ethanol consumption induces the accumulation of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), a major contributor to ethanol-induced ROS production in the liver. We now show that chronic ethanol feeding markedly increased the expression of Srx in the liver of mice in a largely Nrf2-dependent manner. Among Prx I to IV, only Prx I was found to be hyperoxidized in the liver of ethanol-fed wildtype mice, and the level of Prx I-SO(2) increased to ≈30% to 50% of total Prx I in the liver of ethanol-fed Srx(-/-) mice. This result suggests that Prx I is the most active 2-Cys Prx in elimination of ROS from the liver of ethanol-fed mice and that, despite the up-regulation of Srx expression by ethanol, the capacity of Srx is not sufficient to counteract the hyperoxidation of Prx I that occurs during ROS reduction. A protease protection assay revealed that a large fraction of Prx I is located together with CYP2E1 at the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The selective role of Prx I in ROS removal is thus likely attributable to the proximity of Prx I and CYP2E1.

Conclusion: The pivotal functions of Srx and Prx I in protection of the liver in ethanol-fed mice was evident from the severe oxidative damage observed in mice lacking either Srx or Prx I.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.24104DOI Listing
March 2011

Induction of sulfiredoxin via an Nrf2-dependent pathway and hyperoxidation of peroxiredoxin III in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia.

Antioxid Redox Signal 2009 May;11(5):937-48

Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

The cysteine residue at the active site of peroxiredoxin (Prx) I, Prx II, or Prx III is reversibly hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid, with concomitant loss of peroxidase activity, during normal catalysis. Sulfiredoxin (Srx) is the enzyme responsible for reversing this hyperoxidation. We now show that the expression of Srx at both the mRNA and protein levels is increased markedly in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. This hyperoxia-induced expression of Srx was not evident in mice deficient in the transcription factor Nrf2, indicating an essential role for an Nrf2 signaling pathway in this effect. Hyperoxia also elicited the accumulation of the sulfinic form of the mitochondrial enzyme Prx III, but not that of the cytosolic enzymes Prx I or Prx II, in lung tissue. This selective hyperoxidation of Prx III is likely due either to mitochondria being the major site of the hyperoxia-induced production of reactive oxygen species or to the translocation of Srx from the cytosol into mitochondria being rate limiting for the reduction of sulfinic Prx III. Hyperoxia induced the degradation of Prx III in Nrf2-deficient mice but not in wild-type animals, suggesting that, in the absence of a sufficient amount of Srx, sulfinic Prx III is converted to a form that is susceptible to proteolysis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ars.2008.2325DOI Listing
May 2009