Publications by authors named "Sayid Mahdi Mirghazanfari"

9 Publications

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Wound healing effects of Persian walnut () green husk on the incision wound model in rats.

Eur J Transl Myol 2020 Apr 1;30(1):8671. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Department of Pathology, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Walnut green husk (WGH) has been mentioned as a wound-healing agent in traditional Iranian medicine. Although previous studies indicated that WGH is a good source of pharmaceutical ingredients, they did not assess its wound healing activity; so the present study set out the scientific validation of the wound healing potential of the Persian walnut. Total phenolic content, reducing power, DPPH, and nitric oxide scavenging activity of aqueous ethanol extract of WGH was evaluated. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups of 12 each. An incision wound was created on the dorsal region of each rat. WGH extract (20% w/w), WGH burnt residues (20% w/w), Eucerin, and Phenytoin ointments were used in each group. Wound length, contraction percentage, and histopathological evaluations were recorded on days 3, 7, 10, and 14. Total phenolic content and EC values of reducing power, DPPH and nitric oxide scavenging activity of the WGH extract were 61.34 ± 0.64 mg/g dry extract, 0.95 ± 0.02 mg/mL, 0.35 ± 0.01 mg/mL, and 0.28 ± 0.01 mg/mL, respectively. Treated animals with WGH extract showed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) better results for physical and pathological parameters compared to the control group; overall, WGH extract showed better results than WGH burnt residues. The present study indicated that the WGH aqueous ethanol extract has a promising potential for wound healing in the animal model and could be a valuable resource for developing new wound-healing medicines for humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ejtm.2019.8671DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7254423PMC
April 2020

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of hydroalcoholic extracts of Malva sylvestris, Carum carvi or Medicago sativa, and their combination in a rat model.

J Integr Med 2020 Mar 7;18(2):181-188. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1411718541, Iran.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extracts of Malva sylvestris flowers or Carum carvi and Medicago sativa seeds, alone and in combination, which have been used in traditional Iranian medicine.

Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into 6 treatment groups: distilled water, sodium salicylate (SS), M. sylvestris extract (600 mg/kg), C. carvi extract (600 mg/kg), M. sativa extract (300 mg/kg) and combined extract (including 300 mg/kg M. sylvestris and C. carvi extracts, and 150 mg/kg M. sativa extract). The formalin pain model was used to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the treatments. For anti-inflammatory effect, acute (one hour after injection) and chronic (during a week after injection) paw inflammation was measured after subcutaneous injection of 2.5% formalin in the hindpaw. Finally, tissue samples from all groups were prepared for histopathological studies.

Results: The combined extract significantly inhibited the nociception in the acute phase of the formalin test (P < 0.001). In the chronic phase, all the extracts and SS had significant analgesic effect (P < 0.001). Analgesic activity of the combined extract was significantly stronger than SS (P < 0.01). In the acute inflammation model, M. sylvestris, C. carvi and the combined drug had significant inhibitory effects against paw edema (P < 0.05). All extracts, individually and in combination, significantly alleviated chronic paw inflammation (P < 0.01). The combined extract had much more anti-inflammatory activity than SS (P < 0.05). Histopathological results indicated improvement and reduction of inflammatory factors in the treatment groups.

Conclusion: M. sylvestris, C. carvi and M. sativa have analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Potentially, each of these extracts or a mixture of them might be a valuable alternative drug to control pain and inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joim.2020.02.003DOI Listing
March 2020

Investigation of Iranian pomegranate cultivars for wound healing components.

Eur J Transl Myol 2019 Jan 22;29(1):7995. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Physiology and Iranian Medicine, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

One of the most important issues which medical science has been facing is wound healing for the tissue repair with the least complications. In this study, we aimed to isolate, purify and quantitate tannins and phenolic compounds from exocarp and pulp of fruits of Iranian pomegranate cultivars. Our findings demonstrate that the highest amount of tannin extracts from ethanol extract of the black peel exocarp was 201.76 ± 1.93. The highest amount of flavonoids from the ethanol extract of Sweet Alac exocarp was119.69 ± 1.02 as well as antioxidant compounds activity in the exocarp and pulp showed that the highest activity is in the ethanol extract of the black peel was 95.65 ± 3.1. The total phenolic activity indicated that the Sour white peel ethanol extract has the highest phenolic activity 327.05 ± 863. Our data suggest that the ethanol extract of pomegranate exocarp has the higher amounts of tannins and flavonoids, compounds that are known to be beneficial for wound healing. Taken together, these data suggest that compounds isolated from Iranian pomegranate cultivars offer new options for managements of wound healing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ejtm.2019.7995DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460216PMC
January 2019

Antifungal activity of the essential oils of some medicinal plants against human and plant fungal pathogens.

Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) 2018 Dec 31;64(15):13-19. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Physiology and Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The present study was conducted to assess the antifungal activity of essential oils of medicinal plants Mentha piperita (peppermint), Foeniculum vulgare, Satureja hortensis (Savory), Ferula asafoetida and Cuminum cyminum against Alternaria sp., Bipolaris sorokiniana and Acremonium sclerotigenum. The antifungal activity was evaluated by Broth Microdilution Method. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) and Minimum Fungicidal Concentration (MFCs) of the essential oils were compared with Amphotricin B and Captan as standard drug. MIC values for all essential oils were between 1 to 8 mg/mL. MIC value of Fennel essential oil was comparable to MFC value obtained from fungicide Captan. Peppermint essential oil exhibited maximum inhibitory and fungicide activity in concentrations of 2 mg/ml and 4 mg/ml against Alternaria sp. The essential oil was more effective than Fennel against Bipolaris, but MFC values of both essential oils were 4 mg/ml. C. cyminum displayed less susceptibility against all of the fungi. Regarding our finding, peppermint and Fennel oil seem to be a promising solution to control plant diseases.
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December 2018

Determination of total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and antifungal effects of Thymus vulgaris, Trachyspermum ammi and Trigonella foenum-graecum extracts on growth of Fusarium solani.

Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) 2018 Nov 30;64(14):39-46. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Department of Physiology and Persian medicine, School of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Ajowan, thyme and fenugreek are spice and aromatic crops with a number of medicinal properties which are known as important sources of essential phytochemicals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and antifungal activities of these plant extracts on growth of Fusarium solani, an important plant pathogen, soil saprophyte and one of the causal agents of fusariosis in human and animals. Their total antioxidant activity was measured using DPPH radical scavenging assay and their antimicrobial activity was determined through poison food assay at two concentrations (1000 and 1500 ppm) and spore germination assay in vitro. All methanolic extracts showed high antioxidant activity which among them methanolic extract of thyme demonstrated higher antioxidant potential with a low IC50 (16.50 mg ascorbic acid/g). Also, the highest phenolic content (70.55 mg GAE g-1) was observed in methanolic extract of thyme. The highest and lowest amount of thymol was determined in methanolic extract of thyme and aqueous extract of ajowan. Methanolic extracts of thyme leaves and ajowan seeds at concentration of 1500 ppm were potentially effective against F. solani over the control treatments by 90.33% and 85.73%, respectively. Followed by hydro-ethanolic and aqueous extracts exhibited a lesser percentage of inhibition. The MIC value for methanolic extract of thyme and ajowan was 3.75 mg/ml followed by hydro-ethanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. The amount of calculated MFC was ranging from 7.5 to 30 mg/ml for thyme methanolic and fenugreek aqueous extracts, respectively.
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November 2018

Effect of ischemia preconditioning and leech therapy on cutaneous pedicle flaps subjected to prolonged ischemia in a mouse model.

Aesthetic Plast Surg 2014 Oct 5;38(5):1024-9. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran,

We sought to determine the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and hirudotherapy (leech therapy) on cutaneous pedicle flaps after they underwent prolonged ischemia (global ischemia) in a mouse model. Twenty cutaneous pedicle flaps were elevated in 20 mice, and the animals were randomized into four groups: sham, control, IPC and leech (5 flaps in each group). Except in the sham group, all flaps were subjected to global ischemia for 5 h via pedicle clamping. The control group did not receive any treatment before or after global ischemia. In the IPC group, global ischemia was preceded by three 10-min episodes of ischemia, each followed by 10 min of reperfusion. In the leech therapy group, after global ischemia, hirudotherapy was performed. Flap survival area and histopathological changes were evaluated on the 10th day after surgery. Flap survival areas were significantly higher in both the IPC and leech groups than in the control group and were significantly higher in the leech group than in the IPC group (p < 0.05). In conclusion IPC and hirudotherapy had definite effects on the survival area of cutaneous pedicle flaps that underwent prolonged ischemia in a mouse model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00266-014-0399-yDOI Listing
October 2014

Leech therapy for linear incisional skin-wound healing in rats.

J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2014 Aug 25;7(4):194-201. Epub 2014 Jan 25.

Skin and Stem Cell Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of leech therapy (LT), in comparison with topical phenytoin (PHT), on incisional skin-wound healing in animal models.

Methods: This experimental study included 15 male rats (5 animals in 3 groups) with approximately equal body weights (350 ± 10 g). Skin wounds with lengths of 20 mm and depths of 0.5 mm were made on the dorsolateral region of rats 4 cm from the spine. The first group (PHT group) was treated daily with topical PHT (1%) while the second group (LT group) received LT at the beginning of the experiment. The control group received neither the drug nor the therapy. Wound healing was evaluated every day, and the study was continued until the wound had completely healed. Changes in the areas and the appearances of the skin wounds and histological differences (at the end of the experiment) were used to investigate the differences in wound healing among the groups.

Results: The process of wound healing was significantly faster in the group treated with LT (p < 0.05) than in the group treated with the PHT.

Conclusion: The study results showed that LT improved incisional skin-wound healing in rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jams.2014.01.001DOI Listing
August 2014

Acute and subchronic toxicological evaluation of Echinophora platyloba DC (Apiaceae) total extract in Wistar rats.

Clinics (Sao Paulo) 2012 ;67(5):497-502

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Student Scientific Research Center, Iran.

Objective: Echinophora platyloba DC is a widely used herbal medicine and food seasoning in Iran. It is claimed to exert antimicrobial, antifungal, and antispasmodic effects. Despite the prevalent use of this plant as a food and medicine, there are no reports on its possible toxic effects. To evaluate the safety of E. platyloba, we tested its acute and sub-chronic toxicity in male and female Wistar rats.

Methods: Rats were orally treated with four different single doses of E. platyloba total extract and screened for signs of toxicity two weeks after administration. In the sub-chronic toxicity study, E. platyloba was administered for 45 days. Mortality, clinical signs, body weight changes, hematological and biochemical parameters, gross findings, organ weights, and histological markers were monitored during the study.

Results: We found no mortality and no abnormality in clinical signs, body weight, or necropsy findings in any of the animals in the acute study. The results of the subchronic study showed no significant difference in hematological parameters in either sex. There was a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase in the female groups. A significant increase in the relative lung weight of female rats was noted at 500 mg/kg. Histopathological examinations revealed intra-alveolar hemorrhage in the male rats (500 mg/kg). In the females, congestion of the alveolar capillaries (at 500 mg/kg) and liver bridging necrosis (at 200 mg/kg) were significantly increased.

Conclusion: The no observed adverse effect level of E. platyloba was determined to be 200 and 50 mg/kg for male and female rats, respectively.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3351248PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.6061/clinics/2012(05)15DOI Listing
February 2013

The effect of "Teucrium polium L." extracts on insulin release from in situ isolated perfused rat pancreas in a newly modified isolation method: the role of Ca2+ and K+ channels.

Iran Biomed J 2010 10;14(4):178-85

Dept. of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: "Teucrium polium L." (TP) has been long recommended in Iranian folk medicine for its anti-diabetic activities. We attempt here to evaluate the effect of TP extract on insulin secretion in rat pancreas.

Methods: Rat pancreas was isolated in situ and perfused with Krebs solution containing low glucose (LG, 2.8 mM) or high glucose (HG, 16.7 mM) as perfusate. The aqueous extract (Aq. E) and methanolic extract (Met. E) of TP aerial parts and two partition fractions of Met. E were added to perfusate to evaluate insulin release. Diazoxide (DZX) and verapamil (VPM) were also used for assessing the probable mechanism of the effects. In each experimental group, the peak and baseline of insulin levels in effluent samples were compared. The GC/MS analysis was carried out to detect active ingredients in the extracts.

Results: Adding Met. E to the LG caused a significant increase (P<0.05) in insulin release from the basal level of 0.17 ± 0.05 µg/l to a peak value of 3.94 ± 1.29 µg/l. when Met. E was introduced to the HG, there was a further protracted stimulation of insulin release from 2.15 ± 1.35 µg/l to 6.16 ± 0.52 µg/l. Both DZX and VPM when added separately to the LG, led to inhibition of Met. E induced insulin secretion. The Aq. E and fractions had no significant effect on insulin secretion. Only in the Met. E, the component 5-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (apigenin-4',7-dimethylether) was detected.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that the insulinotropic properties of TP extracts can be attributed to the presence of apigenin existing only in Met. E, but not in Aq. E and fractions. Moreover, certain types of K+ and Ca2+ channels take part in this effect.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3632428PMC
October 2010