Dr Saw Bawm, BVSc, MAgr, PhD/ZCE - University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar - Associate Professor

Dr Saw Bawm

BVSc, MAgr, PhD/ZCE

University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar

Associate Professor

Nay Pyi Taw | Myanmar

Additional Specialties: Protozoa, Zoonotic diseases

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3157-1370

Dr Saw Bawm, BVSc, MAgr, PhD/ZCE - University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar - Associate Professor

Dr Saw Bawm

BVSc, MAgr, PhD/ZCE

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar - Nay Pyi Taw , Myanmar

Additional Specialties:

Education

Oct 2002 - Mar 2010
Hokkaido University
MAgr, PhD/ZCE
Laboratory of Parasitology, Graduate School of Veterianry Medicine
Jan 1988 - Aug 1995
University of Veterinary Science, Yezin, Nay Pyi Taw
BVSc
Department of Pharmacology and Parasitology

Experience

Mar 2018 - Mar 2018
University of Veterinary Science
Deputy Director
Department of International Relations and IT
May 2017 - Mar 2018
Hokkaido University
JSPS Fellow
Grad. School of Vet. Med., Laboratory of Parasitology
Oct 2015 - Sep 2016
Hokkaido University
Special Appointed Lecturer
Laboratory of Parasitology
May 2012
University of Veterinary Science, yezin, Nay Pyi Taw
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacology and Parasitology

Publications

17Publications

333Reads

504Profile Views

11PubMed Central Citations

Molecular Phylogeny of Mobatviruses () in Myanmar and Vietnam.

Viruses 2019 Mar 7;11(3). Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

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https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/11/3/228
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v11030228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466252PMC
March 2019
5 Reads
3.279 Impact Factor

First molecular detection of Theileria luwenshuni from goats in Myanmar.

Parasitol Res 2018 Oct 5;117(10):3361-3364. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Graduate School of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0818, Japan.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00436-018-6073-6
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-018-6073-6DOI Listing
October 2018
272 Reads
2.330 Impact Factor

Molecular survey of Babesia infections in cattle from different areas of Myanmar.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2016 Feb 19;7(1):204-207. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2015.10.010DOI Listing
February 2016
7 Reads
2.720 Impact Factor

Epidemiological Survey on Porcine Cysticercosis in Nay Pyi Taw Area, Myanmar.

J Vet Med 2015 26;2015:340828. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Department of Pharmacology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw 15013, Myanmar.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/340828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590850PMC
October 2015
7 Reads
4 Citations

Seasonal abundance of horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) and stable fly (Diptera:Muscidae) collected by Nzi trap within Nay Pyi Taw Area, Myanmar

JEAB. 2015 Jan 2;3(1)1-6

Journal of Environmental and Applied Bioresearch

Blood sucking flies are vectors of medical and veterinary importance. Within Nay Pyi Taw area, a longitudinal study was conducted to collect blood sucking fly samples between January and December, 2011. A total of 2,717 fly samples including 1,506 samples of blood sucking flies and 1,211 samples of non blood sucking flies were collected throughout a year. Collected blood sucking flies were Stomoxys spp. (76%), Tabanus spp. (23.4%), Haematopota spp. (0.3%) and Chrysops spp. (0.3%). The number of blood sucking flies peaked in October in winter (dry) season. Among the collected flies, Stomoxys spp. was found with the highest population in rainy and winter seasons. However, in the summer season, the number of Tabanus spp. was found the highest population. Haematopota and Chrysops spp. were observed only in rainy and winter season. No significant relationship was observed between the number of blood sucking flies and meteorological data such as monthly temperature and monthly rainfall during the study period. This is the first report on seasonal abundance of Tabanidae and Stomoxys flies in Myanmar.

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January 2015
3 Reads

Molecular prevalence and genetic diversity of bovine Theileria orientalis in Myanmar.

Parasitol Int 2014 Aug 29;63(4):640-5. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2014.04.009DOI Listing
August 2014
3 Reads
1 Citation
2.111 Impact Factor

Characterization of Fasciola spp. in Myanmar on the basis of spermatogenesis status and nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers

Parasitology International 60 (2011) 474–479

Parasitology International

Fasciola spp. in Myanmar were characterized on the basis of spermatogenesis status and DNA markers of nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1). We collected 88 adult flukes from Yangon, Lashio, and Myitkyina. Spermatogenesis status was analyzed by the presence of sperm in the seminal vesicles, and 8 aspermic and 80 spermic flukes were detected. The flukes were identified on the basis of spermatogenesis status and ITS1 types which were analyzed by a PCR-RFLP method, and 80 spermic flukes were identified as F. gigantica. A very low detection rate of aspermic Fasciola sp. indicated that they are not established in Myanmar. In phylogenetic analyses, the 7 aspermic Fasciola sp. from Myitkyina displayed a haplotype in nad1 sequence, which was identical to that of aspermic Fasciola sp. from other Asian countries including China. Therefore, they were probably introduced from China through an infected domestic ruminant. On the other hand, 17 nad1 haplotypes detected in F. gigantica belonged to 2 clades unique to Myanmar, each with a distinct founder haplotype in a network analysis. This indicated a unique history of F. gigantica introduction into Myanmar involving ancient artificial movements of domestic ruminants.

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August 2011
4 Reads

Evaluation of Myanmar medicinal plant extracts for antitrypanosomal and cytotoxic activities.

J Vet Med Sci 2010 Apr 22;72(4):525-8. Epub 2009 Dec 22.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University.

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April 2010
8 Reads
0.782 Impact Factor

Evaluation of efficacy of bruceine A, a natural quassinoid compound extracted from a medicinal plant, Brucea javanica, for canine babesiosis.

J Vet Med Sci 2009 Jan;71(1):33-41

Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 8, Sapporo, Japan.

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January 2009
7 Reads
3 Citations
0.782 Impact Factor

In vitro antitrypanosomal activities of quassinoid compounds from the fruits of a medicinal plant, Brucea javanica.

Vet Parasitol 2008 Dec 26;158(4):288-94. Epub 2008 Sep 26.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.09.021DOI Listing
December 2008
4 Reads
3 Citations
2.460 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

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Hokkaido University

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Hokkaido University

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