Publications by authors named "Savino Mauro Di Stasi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How Can the COVID-19 Pandemic Lead to Positive Changes in Urology Residency?

Front Surg 2020 24;7:563006. Epub 2020 Nov 24.

Department of Urology, IEO European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy.

The COVID-19 outbreak, in a few weeks, overloaded Italian hospitals, and the majority of medical procedures were postponed. During the pandemic, with hospital reorganization, clinical and learning activities performed by residents suffered a forced remodulation. The objective of this study is to investigate how urology training in Italy has been affected during the COVID-19 era. In this multi-academic study, we compared residents' training during the highest outbreak level with their previous activity. Overall 387 (67.1%) of the 577 Italian Urology residents participated in a 72-h anonymous online survey with 36 items sent via email. The main outcomes were clinical/surgical activities, social distancing, distance learning, and telemedicine. Clinical and learning activity was significantly reduced for the overall group, and after categorizing residents as those working only in COVID hospitals, both "junior" and "senior" residents, and those working in any of three geographical areas created (Italian regions were clustered in three major zones according to the prevalence of COVID-19). A significant decrease in outpatient activity, invasive diagnostic procedures, and endoscopic and major surgeries was reported. Through multivariate analysis, the specific year of residency has been found to be an independent predictor for all response modification. Being in zone 3 and zone 2 and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors associated with a lower reduction of the clinical and learning activity. Working in a COVID hospital and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors associated with higher reduction of the outpatient activity. Working in zone 3 and having "senior" resident status were independent predictors of lower and higher outpatient surgical activity, respectively. Working in a COVID hospital was an independent predictor associated with robotic surgical activity. The majority of residents reported that distance teaching and multidisciplinary virtual meetings are still not used, and 44.8% reported that their relationships with colleagues decreased. The COVID-19 pandemic presents an unprecedented challenge, including changes in the training and education of urology residents. The COVID era can offer an opportunity to balance and implement innovative solutions that can bridge the educational gap and can be part of future urology training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2020.563006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7732553PMC
November 2020

Localised prostate cancer and hemophilia A (AHA): Case report and management of the disease.

Arch Ital Urol Androl 2014 Sep 30;86(3):227-8. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Urologic Oncology Unit, Policlinico Casilino, Rome.

Acquired Hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding diathesis characterized by the development of autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII). About half of the cases are idiopathic and the other half are associated with autoimmune diseases, postpartum problems, infections, inflammatory bowel disease, drugs, lymphoproliferative disorders or solid tumors . AHA is associated with malignancies in 7-15% of cases. We report a case of AHA in a 65 year old patient with prostatic carcinoma, who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RP).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/aiua.2014.3.227DOI Listing
September 2014

Retropubic, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: surgical, oncological, and functional outcomes: a systematic review.

Urol Int 2014 23;93(4):373-83. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy.

Objectives: Despite the wide diffusion of minimally invasive approaches, such as laparoscopic (LRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP), few studies compare the results of these techniques with the retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) approach. The aim of this study is to compare the surgical, functional, and oncological outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RRP, LRP, and RALP.

Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed in the PubMed and Embase databases in December 2013. A 'free-text' protocol using the term 'radical prostatectomy' was applied. A total of 16,085 records were found. The authors reviewed the records to identify comparative studies to include in the review.

Results: 44 comparative studies were identified. With regard to the perioperative outcome, LRP and RALP were more time-consuming than RRP, but blood loss, transfusion rates, catheterisation time, hospitalisation duration, and complication rates were the most optimal in the laparoscopic approaches. With regard to the functional and oncological results, RALP was found to have the best outcomes.

Conclusion: Our study confirmed the well-known perioperative advantage of minimally invasive techniques; however, available data were not sufficient to prove the superiority of any surgical approach in terms of functional and oncologic outcomes. On the contrary, cost comparison clearly supports RRP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000366008DOI Listing
August 2015

Updates in intravesical electromotive drug administration of mitomycin-C for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

World J Urol 2009 Jun 21;27(3):325-30. Epub 2009 Feb 21.

Department of Surgery/Urology, Tor Vergata University, Via Montpellier 1, Rome 00133, Italy.

Electromotive drug administration (EMDA) increases the local drug efficacy by controlling and enhancing transmembranous transport into tissue. EMDA of intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC) has been used for treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) for about a decade on the basis of laboratory studies that demonstrated an enhanced administration rate of MMC into all bladder wall layers after EMDA compared to standard instillation/passive diffusion (PD). Higher MMC concentrations might have a clinical impact since EMDA was associated with lower recurrence rates than PD in randomized studies. Further data suggest that EMDA/MMC is at least equivalent to BCG in treatment of high-risk bladder tumours. In addition, BCG combined with EMDA/MMC as well as preoperative EMDA/MMC are new therapeutic strategies with promising preliminary results in terms of higher remission rates and longer remission times. In summary, these findings suggest that EMDA for MMC delivery in the bladder could be a major therapeutic breakthrough in the treatment of NMIBC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00345-009-0389-xDOI Listing
June 2009

Radical prostatectomy as unique chance for huge prostatic stones.

Arch Ital Urol Androl 2004 Dec;76(4):171-2

Department of Urology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

Prostatic calculi occur very often in men, but exceptionally they cause an almost total destruction of the prostatic parenchyma. Preferred treatment in order to obtain complete resolution is either transurethral resection or suprapubic simple prostatectomy. We report for the first time a radical prostatectomy as a unique chance for huge prostatic stones in a 56-years old man with severe urinary symptoms. We perform a retropubic radical prostatectomy using a nerve sparing technique. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Though radical prostatectomy is an invasive approach to treat a young man affected by prostatic stones and without prostate cancer, we chose to perform it because of the impossibility to obtain complete recovery with transurethral or suprapubic simple prostatectomy.
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December 2004

Cavernous hemangioma of the renal hilum presenting as an avascularized solid mass.

Urol Int 2003 ;71(3):325-8

Department of Urology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Casilino Hospital, Rome, Italy.

Hemangiomas are slowly growing benign vascular tumours which rarely involve the kidney. They usually occur in the mucosa or subepithelial tissue of the pelvis, in the pyramid of the kidney and in the cortex. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma presenting as a solid, paradoxically avascular mass of the right renal hilum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000072688DOI Listing
February 2004