Publications by authors named "Saule Turuspekova"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The epidemiology of myasthenia gravis.

J Med Life 2021 Jan-Mar;14(1):7-16

Neurology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy.

Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) disorders include several dysfunctions that ultimately lead to muscle weakness. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most prevalent NMJ disorder with a highly polymorphic clinical presentation and many different faces. Being an autoimmune disease, MG correlates with the presence of detectable antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase, lipoprotein-related protein 4, agrin, titin, and ryanodine in the postsynaptic membrane at the NMJ. MG has become a prototype serving to understand both autoimmunity and the function of the NMJ better. The aim of this review is to synthesize some of the epidemiological data available. Epidemiological data regarding MG are important for postulating hypotheses regarding its etiology and facilitating the description of MG subtypes. Thus, adequate documentation through broad databases is essential. The incidence and prevalence of MG reported around the globe have been rising steadily and consistently over the past decades. Ethnic aspects, gender-related differences, and environmental risk factors have been described, implying that these might contribute to a specific phenotype, further suggesting that MG may be considered an umbrella term that covers several clinical entities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25122/jml-2020-0145DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7982252PMC
April 2021

Complementary and alternative medicine in epilepsy: A global survey of physicians' opinions.

Epilepsy Behav 2021 04 18;117:107835. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Kyrgyz State Medical Academy, Neurology and Clinical Genetics Department, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.

Purpose: To investigate the opinions of physicians on the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with epilepsy (PWE) worldwide.

Methods: Online survey addressed to neurologists and psychiatrists from different countries.

Results: Totally, 1112 physicians from 25 countries (different world region: Europe, North America, South America, Middle-East, Africa, Former Soviet Union Republics) participated; 804 (72.3%) believed that CAM might be helpful in PWE. The most commonly endorsed CAM included meditation (41%) and yoga (39%). Female sex, psychiatry specialization, and working in North and South America were associated with the belief that CAM is helpful in PWE. Two-hundred and forty five out of 1098 participants (22.3%) used/prescribed CAM to PWE; among them, 174 (71%) people perceived CAM to be less effective and 114 (46.5%) people found CAM to be safer than conventional antiseizure medications (ASMs). The most common reasons to prescribe CAM for PWE were: to satisfy the patient (49.9%), dissatisfaction with the efficacy (35.6%), and dissatisfaction with the adverse effects (31.2%) of conventional therapies.

Conclusion: Although the evidence supporting the use of CAM for the treatment of epilepsy is extremely sparse, most physicians worldwide believe that it could be integrated with the use of conventional ASMs, at least in some patients. High-quality controlled trials are warranted to provide robust evidence on the usefulness of CAM options in PWE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2021.107835DOI Listing
April 2021

Prevalence of Mild Cognitive Impairment Among Older People in Kazakhstan and Potential Risk Factors: A Cross-sectional Study.

Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 2019 Apr-Jun;33(2):136-141

Department of Epidemiology and Geriatric Medicine, School of Public Health and Centre for Education and Research on Ageing University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Background: There have been no epidemiological studies of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Central Asia.

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of, and risk factors for, MCI in an urban population in Kazakhstan.

Methods: Adults aged 60 years and over were randomly selected from registers of 15 polyclinics in Almaty. Of 790 eligible people, 668 agreed to participate (response rate 85%). Subjects were screened using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Those who scored 26 or lower on the MoCA were assessed by a multidisciplinary team and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI or dementia was made.

Results: The median MoCA score was 22 and the prevalence of MCI was 30%. MoCA scores were lower, and MCI prevalence was higher, among those with less education and those with older age. There was no difference in MoCA scores or MCI prevalence by sex or ethnic group (Kazakh or Russian). High blood pressure, older age, and lower education were associated with increased odds of MCI in crude analyses but only age and education remained statistically significant in an adjusted logistic regression model.

Conclusions: The prevalence of MCI in Kazakhstan is high. Higher levels of education may lead to lower prevalence of MCI in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0000000000000298DOI Listing
April 2020
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