Publications by authors named "Satyashree Gagan"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Retrobulbar Hyaluronidase Injection: Does It Reach the Eye?

Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jul 21. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, Brien Holden Eye Research Centre Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Service, L.V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India.

Purpose: To determine if retrobulbar injection of hyaluronidase reaches the vitreous cavity, and to determine its concentration in the vitreous.

Methods: Prospective case-control study. Patients undergoing evisceration with implant for noninfective blind eyes were enrolled in the study. Before the evisceration, a retrobulbar injection of 3,000 IU of hyaluronidase (2 ml) was injected. Time from injection to in vivo sampling of posterior vitreous was noted. Vitreous samples from controls were obtained from patients undergoing vitrectomy for retinal detachment or diabetic retinopathy. Concentration of hyaluronidase was assessed in all 30 samples. An ELISA-based microtiter-technique was used to evaluate the activity of hyaluronidase by an avidin-peroxidase-based procedure using an ELISA reader. Incubations were carried out at room temperature and at 37°C. All the samples were analyzed in duplicates, and the mean of each sample was plotted on a scatter plot.

Results: Total of 30 vitreous samples were analyzed, of which 15 were controls and 15 were test samples. Of the 15 test samples, injection-to-sampling time was 0 to 20 minutes in 4 samples, 20 to 40 minutes in 6 samples, and 40 to 60 minutes in 5 samples. The highest concentration of hyaluronidase detected in control and test samples were 2.9 and 3.0 µg/ml, and the lowest concentration was 1.7 and 1.5 µg/ml (SD 0.3), respectively. There was no significant difference between control and test groups.

Conclusion: Retrobulbar injection did not result in higher concentration of hyaluronidase in the posterior vitreous compared with controls when measured up to 60 minutes following injection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IOP.0000000000002022DOI Listing
July 2021

Evaluation of vitreous Procalcitonin as a diagnostic biomarker in infectious endophthalmitis.

Int Ophthalmol 2021 May 24. Epub 2021 May 24.

Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, Brien Holden Eye Research Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500034, India.

Background: Endophthalmitis is a potentially blinding intraocular infection following intraocular surgery or trauma. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important in preventing devastating visual complications. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a promising biomarker for diagnosing bacterial infections. The aim of the study was to measure vitreous PCT in infectious endophthalmitis and assess its utility as a biomarker.

Methods: In this prospective study, vitreous was collected from patients with non-infectious retinal disorders and infectious endophthalmitis. PCT was measured using the Human Procalcitonin ELISA Kit. The diagnostic performance of PCT was calculated via receiver operating characteristic curves.

Results: The study included three groups: patients with non-infectious retinal conditions, culture-positive endophthalmitis, and culture-negative endophthalmitis. The average PCT was 75.74 ± 26.8 pg mL, 100.24 ± 12.9 pg mL, and 126.41 ± 26.47 pg mL in control, culture-negative, and culture-positive endophthalmitis, respectively. There was a significant difference in the vitreous PCT in the study and control groups (p = 0.04), but not between culture-positive and culture-negative endophthalmitis (p = 0.65). The sensitivity (66.7%) and specificity (65%) for PCT with a cut-off of ≤ 54.88 pg mL(p = 0.31) implied that its diagnostic accuracy was not significant. But there was a significant difference in gram-negative (68.2 ± 16.5 pg mL) and gram-positive (175.09 ± 45 pg mL) (p = 0.02) bacterial infections; the sensitivity and specificity were 70%, with a cut-off of ≤ 82.3 pg mL.

Conclusions: This study showed that vitreous procalcitonin concentration might not be a suitable biomarker for diagnosing culture-negative endophthalmitis though it could help distinguish between gram-positive and gram-negative infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10792-021-01903-0DOI Listing
May 2021
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