Publications by authors named "Satomi Koide"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparisons Between Normal Body Mass Index and Overweight Patients Who Underwent Unilateral Microsurgical Breast Reconstructions.

Ann Surg Oncol 2021 Jan 8;28(1):353-362. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

Center of Lymphedema Microsurgery, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 5, Fu-Hsing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan, ROC.

Background: This study compared the outcomes of unilateral microsurgical breast reconstructions using abdomen-based flaps between normal body mass index (BMI; 18.5 < BMI < 24.9 kg/m) and overweight (25 < BMI < 29.9 kg/m) patients.

Methods: Between March 2000 and December 2015, patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstructions using abdomen-based flaps were retrospectively evaluated. Outcomes variables evaluated included the flap-used weight, flap-used/flap-harvested percentage, flap-used/specimen percentage, complication rates, revision procedures, and quality of life using the Breast-Q questionnaires.

Results: A total of 415 patients with a mean age of 45.3 ± 8.2 years underwent 418 abdomen-based flaps. The overall success rate was 98.8%, with 99.1% and 97.9% of patients included in the normal BMI and overweight groups, respectively (p = 0.36). The mean flap-used weight and flap-used/flap-harvested values of 461 ± 132.1 g and 82.2 ± 11.6%, respectively, in the normal BMI group were statistically different from values of 610 ± 148.9 g and 71.4 ± 14.1% in the overweight group (both p < 0.01). The mean flap-used/specimen percentage was 118.5 ± 32.9 and 111.7 ± 36.6 in the normal BMI and overweight groups, respectively (p = 0.26). At a mean follow-up of 135 ± 55.4 months, there were no statistical differences between the two groups in terms of total complication rates (25.7% vs. 29.2%; p = 0.30), revision times (36.1% vs. 36.5%; p = 0.91) and all four domains (all p > 0.05) of the Breast-Q.

Conclusions: Patients with a normal BMI required a smaller flap-used weight but higher flap-used/flap-harvested percentage for unilateral microsurgical breast reconstructions that could be performed with a high success rate and comparable complication and revision rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-020-09076-3DOI Listing
January 2021

Delayed primary retention suture for inset of vascularized submental lymph node flap for lower extremity lymphedema.

J Surg Oncol 2020 Jan 5;121(1):138-143. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Plastic and Reconstrucitve Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Vascularized lymph node transfer (VLNT) has become one of the effective surgical treatments for extremity lymphedema. This study was to evaluate the re-exploration and total complication rates of VLNT for lower extremity lymphedema between two different flap inset techniques.

Methods: Sixty-nine patients who underwent 74 submental VLNT transfers between 2008 and 2018 were retrospectively studied. Fifty-six flaps were inset using a new delayed primary retention suture (DPRS) technique and other 18 flaps using conventional interrupted sutures as the non-DPRS group.

Results: The overall flap success rate was 100%. The DPRS group was released at a mean of 1.7  ± 0.7 times and took a mean of 10.3 ± 3.3 days for wound closure. There were no statistical differences in demographics, mean symptom duration, and mean Cheng's Lymphedema Grading between two groups. Mean frequency of cellulitis of 2.5 ± 1.5 times/year in non-DPRS group was significantly greater than 1.4 ± 1.6 times/year in DPRS group (P = .01). The re-exploration and total complication rates were 5.4% and 7.1% in DPRS group, and 27.8% and 33.3% in non-DPRS group, respectively (P = .02 and .02, respectively).

Conclusions: The DPRS technique is a safe, simple, and reliable method for insetting the submental VLNT, which statistically decreased the re-exploration and total complication rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.25520DOI Listing
January 2020

Long-term outcome of lower extremity lymphedema treated with vascularized lymph node flap transfer with or without venous complications.

J Surg Oncol 2020 Jan 27;121(1):129-137. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Division of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University and Medical College, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Background: Vascularized submental lymph node (VSLN) transfer is an emerging approach for extremity lymphedema. This study investigated the long-term outcome and venous complications of VSLN for unilateral lower extremity lymphedema.

Methods: Between 2010 and 2018, patients who underwent VSLN for unilateral lower extremity lymphedema were retrospectively evaluated. Patient demographics, operative records, complications, circumferential improvement, and episodes of cellulitis were analyzed. Further comparisons were performed between different types, numbers, and techniques of venous anastomoses.

Results: A total of 75 VSLNs in 70 patients survived, giving a 100% success rate. Six flaps (8%) had venous complications (VC group) and 69 flaps (92%) did not (No-VC group). There were no statistical differences in types, numbers, and techniques of anastomoses between two groups (P = .65, 1, and .56, respectively). At a mean follow-up of 32.0 ± 23.0 months, mean circumferential improvement and episodes of cellulitis between two groups did not statistically differ significantly (P = .31 and .09, respectively).

Conclusions: VSLN is an effective treatment for lower extremity lymphedema. The types, numbers of veins, and techniques of venous anastomoses did not statistically affect the venous complication rates. Functional outcomes of the VSLNs were not compromised if venous complications were salvaged promptly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.25602DOI Listing
January 2020

Endoscopic release for severe carpal tunnel syndrome in octogenarians.

J Hand Surg Am 2014 Dec 29;39(12):2448-53. Epub 2014 Oct 29.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ogori Daiichi General Hospital, Ogori, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcomes of endoscopic carpal tunnel release for severe carpal tunnel syndrome in octogenarians compared with a younger cohort.

Methods: Fifty-five hands in 48 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 27 hands in 24 octogenarians and 28 hands in 24 patients in a younger group with average ages of 83 and 60 years, respectively. Postoperative follow-ups were 8.5 and 7.2 months, respectively. Clinical evaluation included documentation of subjective symptoms and Semmes-Weinstein testing before surgery, 3 months after surgery, and at final follow-up. Symptom severity and function outcomes scores and compound muscle action potential of abductor pollicis brevis as an electrophysiological assessment were evaluated before surgery and at the final follow-up.

Results: Nocturnal pain and paresthesias were improved in all patients. The octogenarians had poorer recovery of Semmes-Weinstein testing score and better improvement of outcomes scores than the younger group. There was no difference of the results in postoperative electrophysiological improvement between the groups.

Conclusions: Endoscopic release for severe carpal tunnel syndrome relieved symptoms and improved activities of daily living in octogenarians.

Type Of Study/level Of Evidence: Therapeutic III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.09.018DOI Listing
December 2014

Camitz tendon transfer using flexor retinaculum as a pulley in advanced carpal tunnel syndrome.

J Hand Surg Am 2014 Dec 7;39(12):2454-9. Epub 2014 Oct 7.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ogori Daiichi General Hospital, Ogori, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Purpose: To report the outcomes of modified Camitz abductor plasty using the released flexor retinaculum as a pulley in patients with advanced carpal tunnel syndrome.

Methods: A retrospective review of 46 hands in 43 patients who underwent modified Camitz abductor plasty was performed. Active palmar abduction of thumb and pulp pinch strength were assessed. Patient-reported outcome measures were assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome instrument. As an electrophysiological assessment, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from abductor pollicis brevis (APB) was investigated.

Results: At 3 months, active palmar abduction of thumb and pulp pinch strength significantly improved. Although pulp pinch strength further improved, active abduction of thumb did not improve at the final follow-up. Both the patient-reported outcome measures improved at 3 months and further improved at final follow-up. Approximately 75% of improved scores were obtained at the first 3 months after surgery and the balance of improved scores (25%) was obtained by the time of final follow-up. Useful recovery of postoperative APB-CMAP (amplitude > 1.8 mV) was obtained in 3 hands (7%) at 3 months after surgery and in 23 hands (50%) at final follow-up. There was no statistical significance of the postoperative results including active palmar abduction of thumb and improvement of patient-reported outcome measures at final follow-up between the hands with useful recovery of postoperative APB-CMAP and the hands without it.

Conclusions: Modified Camitz abductor plasty benefitted the early improvement of activity of daily living in patients with advanced carpal tunnel syndrome. It acted not only as an internal orthosis in patients who eventually recovered thenar muscle function but also as the sole palmar abductor of the thumb in patients who failed to recover useful thenar muscle function.

Type Of Study/level Of Evidence: Therapeutic IV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.09.008DOI Listing
December 2014