Publications by authors named "Sathidpak Nantasanti"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development.

J Clin Invest 2016 08 25;126(8):2955-69. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle-dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we evaluated the function of the atypical repressor genes E2f7 and E2f8 in adult liver physiology. Using several loss-of-function alleles in mice, we determined that combined deletion of E2f7 and E2f8 in hepatocytes leads to HCC. Temporal-specific ablation strategies revealed that E2f8's tumor suppressor role is critical during the first 2 weeks of life, which correspond to a highly proliferative stage of postnatal liver development. Disruption of E2F8's DNA binding activity phenocopied the effects of an E2f8 null allele and led to HCC. Finally, a profile of chromatin occupancy and gene expression in young and tumor-bearing mice identified a set of shared targets for E2F7 and E2F8 whose increased expression during early postnatal liver development is associated with HCC progression in mice. Increased expression of E2F8-specific target genes was also observed in human liver biopsies from HCC patients compared to healthy patients. In summary, these studies suggest that E2F8-mediated transcriptional repression is a critical tumor suppressor mechanism during postnatal liver development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI85506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4966321PMC
August 2016

Surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation initiate cancer in cytokeratin-19+- liver cells deficient for p53 and Rb.

Oncotarget 2016 Aug;7(34):54662-54675

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The long term prognosis of liver cancer patients remains unsatisfactory because of cancer recurrence after surgical interventions, particularly in patients with viral infections. Since hepatitis B and C viral proteins lead to inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and Retinoblastoma (Rb), we hypothesize that surgery in the context of p53/Rb inactivation initiate de novo tumorigenesis.We, therefore, generated transgenic mice with hepatocyte and cholangiocyte/liver progenitor cell (LPC)-specific deletion of p53 and Rb, by interbreeding conditional p53/Rb knockout mice with either Albumin-cre or Cytokeratin-19-cre transgenic mice.We show that liver cancer develops at the necrotic injury site after surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation in p53/Rb deficient livers. Cancer initiation occurs as a result of specific migration, expansion and transformation of cytokeratin-19+-liver (CK-19+) cells. At the injury site migrating CK-19+ cells formed small bile ducts and adjacent cells strongly expressed the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Isolated cytokeratin-19+ cells deficient for p53/Rb were resistant against hypoxia and TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition. CK-19+ specific deletion of p53/Rb verified that carcinomas at the injury site originates from cholangiocytes or liver progenitor cells.These findings suggest that human liver patients with hepatitis B and C viral infection or with mutations for p53 and Rb are at high risk to develop tumors at the surgical intervention site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.9952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5342371PMC
August 2016

Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

PLoS One 2016 11;11(3):e0150064. Epub 2016 Mar 11.

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3584CL, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC). DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0150064PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4788452PMC
November 2016

Concise Review: Organoids Are a Powerful Tool for the Study of Liver Disease and Personalized Treatment Design in Humans and Animals.

Stem Cells Transl Med 2016 Mar 21;5(3):325-30. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Organoids are three-dimensional culture systems in which adult stem cells and their progeny grow and represent the native physiology of the cells in vivo. Organoids have been successfully derived from several organ systems in both animal models and human patients. Organoids have been used for fundamental research, disease modeling, drug testing, and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the applications of liver-derived organoids and discuss their potential. It is likely that organoids will provide an invaluable tool to unravel disease mechanisms, design novel (personalized) treatment strategies, and generate autologous stem cells for gene editing and transplantation purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5966/sctm.2015-0152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4807664PMC
March 2016

Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids.

Stem Cell Reports 2015 Nov 8;5(5):895-907. Epub 2015 Oct 8.

Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3584 CM, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2015.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4649105PMC
November 2015

E2F8 is essential for polyploidization in mammalian cells.

Nat Cell Biol 2012 Nov 14;14(11):1181-91. Epub 2012 Oct 14.

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3584CL Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Polyploidization is observed in all mammalian species and is a characteristic feature of hepatocytes, but its molecular mechanism and biological significance are unknown. Hepatocyte polyploidization in rodents occurs through incomplete cytokinesis, starts after weaning and increases with age. Here, we show in mice that atypical E2F8 is induced after weaning and required for hepatocyte binucleation and polyploidization. A deficiency in E2f8 led to an increase in the expression level of E2F target genes promoting cytokinesis and thereby preventing polyploidization. In contrast, loss of E2f1 enhanced polyploidization and suppressed the polyploidization defect of hepatocytes deficient for atypical E2Fs. In addition, E2F8 and E2F1 were found on the same subset of target promoters. Contrary to the long-standing hypothesis that polyploidization indicates terminal differentiation and senescence, we show that prevention of polyploidization through inactivation of atypical E2Fs has, surprisingly, no impact on liver differentiation, zonation, metabolism and regeneration. Together, these results identify E2F8 as a repressor and E2F1 as an activator of a transcriptional network controlling polyploidization in mammalian cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncb2585DOI Listing
November 2012