Publications by authors named "Sasanka M Handunnetti"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immune recovery in patients with mantle cell lymphoma receiving long-term ibrutinib and venetoclax combination therapy.

Blood Adv 2020 10;4(19):4849-4859

ACRF Translational Research Laboratory, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Combination venetoclax plus ibrutinib for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has demonstrated efficacy in the relapsed or refractory setting; however, the long-term impact on patient immunology is unknown. In this study, changes in immune subsets of MCL patients treated with combination venetoclax and ibrutinib were assessed over a 4-year period. Multiparameter flow cytometry of peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that ≥12 months of treatment resulted in alterations in the proportions of multiple immune subsets, most notably CD4+ and CD8+ effector and central memory T cells and natural killer cells, and normalization of T-cell cytokine production in response to T-cell receptor stimulation. Gene expression analysis identified upregulation of multiple myeloid genes (including S100 and cathepsin family members) and inflammatory pathways over 12 months. Four patients with deep responses stopped study drugs, resulting in restoration of normal immune subsets for all study parameters except myeloid gene/pathway expression, suggesting long-term combination venetoclax and ibrutinib irreversibly affects this population. Our findings demonstrate that long-term combination therapy is associated with immune recovery in MCL, which may allow responses to subsequent immunotherapies and suggests that this targeted therapy results in beneficial impacts on immunological recovery. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02471391.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020002810DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7556128PMC
October 2020

Immune impacts of Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients: are we closer to a holy grail?

Leuk Lymphoma 2020 10 8;61(10):2283-2285. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

Clinical Haematology Department, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2020.1811865DOI Listing
October 2020

BTK inhibitor therapy is effective in patients with CLL resistant to venetoclax.

Blood 2020 06;135(25):2266-2270

Department of Clinical Haematology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Highly active BTK inhibitors (BTKis) and the BCL2 inhibitor venetoclax have transformed the therapeutic landscape for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Results of prospective clinical trials demonstrate the efficacy of venetoclax to salvage patients with disease progression on BTKis, but data on BTKi therapy after disease progression on venetoclax are limited, especially regarding durability of benefit. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 23 consecutive patients with relapsed/refractory CLL who received a BTKi (ibrutinib, n = 21; zanubrutinib, n = 2) after stopping venetoclax because of progressive disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and median overall survival after BTKi initiation were 34 months (range, <1 to 49) and 42 months (range, 2-49), respectively. Prior remission duration ≥24 months and attainment of complete remission or undetectable measurable residual disease on venetoclax were associated with longer PFS after BTKi salvage (P = .044 and P = .029, respectively). BTKi therapy achieved durable benefit for patients with the BCL2 Gly101Val venetoclax resistance mutation (estimated 24-month PFS, 69%). At a median survivor follow-up of 33 months (range, 2-53), 11 patients remained on BTKi and 12 had stopped therapy because of disease progression (n = 8) or toxicity (n = 4). Our findings indicate that BTKi therapy can provide durable CLL control after disease progression on venetoclax.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020004782DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7316215PMC
June 2020

Undetectable peripheral blood MRD should be the goal of venetoclax in CLL, but attainment plateaus after 24 months.

Blood Adv 2020 01;4(1):165-173

Department of Clinical Haematology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Parkville, Australia.

The highly selective BCL2 inhibitor venetoclax achieves deep responses in patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including undetectable minimal residual disease (uMRD). We retrospectively reviewed 62 patients with CLL treated with venetoclax to investigate the performance of peripheral blood (PB) compared with bone marrow (BM) assessment of MRD; the kinetics, clinicopathological associations, and longer-term outcomes of uMRD attainment and recrudescence; and the ability of venetoclax dose escalation to deepen responses. Among 16 patients who achieved PB uMRD and had contemporaneous BM assessments, 13 (81%) had confirmed BM uMRD, and patients with PB uMRD had outcomes at least as favorable as those with BM uMRD for time to progression, overall survival, and MRD recrudescence. Excluding 2 patients lacking earlier assessment, the median time to PB uMRD was 18 (range, 5-26) months, with 90% of instances achieved by 24 months. There was no new PB uMRD attainment after 24 months without treatment intensification. The dominant association with earlier attainment of uMRD was concurrent rituximab (P = .012). Complex karyotype was associated with inferior uMRD attainment after 12 months of therapy (P = .015), and patients attaining uMRD whose disease harbored TP53 abnormalities demonstrated a trend toward earlier recrudescence (P = .089). Of patients who received venetoclax dose escalations, 4 (27%) of 15 achieved improvements in response. For patients with R/R CLL receiving venetoclax, PB uMRD commonly correlates with BM uMRD and is associated with a comparable longer-term prognosis. Concurrent rituximab augments uMRD attainment, but dose escalation and further treatment beyond 24 months infrequently deepen responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000864DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960473PMC
January 2020

Ibrutinib, but not zanubrutinib, induces platelet receptor shedding of GPIb-IX-V complex and integrin αIIbβ3 in mice and humans.

Blood Adv 2019 12;3(24):4298-4311

Thrombosis and Vascular Diseases Laboratory, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.

The Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib has proven to be efficacious in the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and related diseases. However, a major adverse side effect of ibrutinib is bleeding, including major hemorrhages. The bleeding associated with ibrutinib use is thought to be due to a combination of on-target irreversible Btk inhibition, as well as off-target inhibition of other kinases, including EGFR, ITK, JAK3, and Tec kinase. In this study, we investigated the effects of ibrutinib vs zanubrutinib (a more selective Btk inhibitor) on platelet activation, glycoprotein expression, and thrombus formation. Ibrutinib, but not zanubrutinib, induced a time- and dose-dependent shedding of GPIb-IX complex and integrin αIIbβ3, but not of GPVI and GPV, from the platelet surface. The shedding of GPIbα and GPIX was blocked by GM6001 and TAPI-2, an ADAM17 inhibitor but not ADAM10 inhibitor. Ibrutinib but not zanubrutinib treatment of human platelets increased ADAM17 activation. Pretreatment of C57BL/6 mice with ibrutinib (10 mg/kg), but not zanubrutinib (10 mg/kg), inhibited ex vivo and in vivo thrombus growth over time. Platelets from ibrutinib-treated patients with CLL showed reduced GPIb-IX complex and integrin αIIbβ3 surface expression and reduced ex vivo thrombus formation under arterial flow, which was not observed in zanubrutinib-treated patients. In mice, ibrutinib, but not zanubrutinib, led to increased soluble GPIbα and soluble αIIb levels in plasma. These data demonstrate that ibrutinib induces shedding of GPIbα and GPIX by an ADAM17-dependent mechanism and integrin αIIbβ3 by an unknown sheddase, and this process occurs in vivo to regulate thrombus formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6929381PMC
December 2019

Microvesicles in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: ready for prime time in the clinic?

Leuk Lymphoma 2017 06;58(6):1281-1282

a Haematology Department , Peter MacCallum Cancer Center , Melbourne , Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2017.1298756DOI Listing
June 2017
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