Publications by authors named "Sarah Maki"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

January consultation #4.

J Cataract Refract Surg 2020 Jan;46(1):156-157

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.j.jcrs.0000668268.23696.1aDOI Listing
January 2020

Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness Increases with Decreasing Spectralis OCT Signal Strength in Normal Eyes.

Neuroophthalmology 2020 Apr 29;44(2):100-103. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

We sought to determine effect of signal strength on mean retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) using Spectralis optical coherence tomography (S-OCT). Thirty normal subjects (18 female, mean 37.9 years, range 24-61) were imaged with S-OCT using variably dense Bangerter foils to alter Q value (1 unit signal strength = 4 units Q). We found a statistically significant (p < 0.01) linear relationship (R = 0.8643) between Q and RNFL (1 unit decrease Q = 0.181 um mean RNFL increase). Unlike previous observations of Cirrus and Stratus OCT, we found RNFL thickness does not decrease with decreasing signal strength in S-OCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01658107.2019.1653934DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7202426PMC
April 2020

Case Report: Penetrating Corneal Injury Under an Intact Laser-assisted in Situ Keratomileusis Flap.

Optom Vis Sci 2018 11;95(11):1083-1086

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Significance: As the prevalence of post-laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) patients rises, recognition of possible traumatic complications and their management in this population becomes increasingly relevant. Penetrating injuries and intraocular foreign bodies are possible in post-LASIK corneas despite an intact anterior corneal surface. However, with prompt recognition and treatment, excellent visual recovery can be achieved.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report an interesting case of a penetrating foreign body through an intact LASIK flap.

Case Report: A 48-year-old man presented to an outside provider with right eye pain after his eye was struck by a tree branch. His ocular history was notable for uncomplicated LASIK surgery 4 years before presentation. On initial examination, the patient was diagnosed as having a small corneal abrasion and hyphema. Despite appropriate therapy, his eye continued to subjectively and objectively worsen. Follow-up examination after the injury was notable for a new dense hypopyon. Because of concern for secondary infection, the patient was referred urgently for further evaluation. Upon referral, the patient was noted to have a dense, fibrinous mass located inferiorly in the anterior chamber. Although the cornea was edematous temporally with deep folds, the anterior corneal surface appeared intact without evidence of laceration or flap displacement. Concern for endophthalmitis prompted anterior chamber washout, where a large vegetative foreign body was recovered despite an intact anterior corneal surface and LASIK. Post-operative anterior-segment optical coherence tomography after resolution of the corneal edema confirmed the presence of a well-aligned penetrating tract through the posterior stromal bed underneath the LASIK flap. Epithelial ingrowth that developed within the post-operative period further affirmed the initial tract of the penetrating foreign body.

Conclusions: This case illustrates a novel complication after trauma in a post-LASIK patient, describes possible management, and underscores the care that must be taken when assessing patients with a history of LASIK surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0000000000001297DOI Listing
November 2018

January consultation #5.

J Cataract Refract Surg 2018 01;44(1):115

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrs.2018.01.009DOI Listing
January 2018

Withanolide A and asiatic acid modulate multiple targets associated with amyloid-beta precursor protein processing and amyloid-beta protein clearance.

J Nat Prod 2010 Jul;73(7):1196-202

Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease histochemically characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid beta (Abeta) protein and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. AD is considered to be a complex, multifactorial syndrome, with numerous causal factors contributing to its pathogenesis. Thus, for any novel therapeutic molecule to have a "disease-modifying" effect on AD, it must be able to modulate multiple, synergistic targets simultaneously. In this context, we have studied two compounds of plant origin [withanolide A (1) and asiatic acid (2)] for their potential activities against multiple targets associated with Abeta pathways (BACE1, ADAM10, IDE, and NEP). BACE1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in the production of Abeta from amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP), while ADAM10 is involved in non-amyloidogenic processing of AbetaPP. IDE and NEP are two of the prominent enzymes involved in effectively degrading Abeta. It was found that both 1 and 2 significantly down-regulated BACE1 and also up-regulated ADAM10 in primary rat cortical neurons. In addition, 1 significantly up-regulated IDE levels, which may help in degrading excess Abeta from the AD brain. On the basis of the data obtained, the two multifunctional compounds may prove valuable in developing novel, effective therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of AD-associated amyloid pathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/np900633jDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2917495PMC
July 2010
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