Publications by authors named "Sarah Kishinevsky"

11 Publications

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The epichaperome is a mediator of toxic hippocampal stress and leads to protein connectivity-based dysfunction.

Nat Commun 2020 01 16;11(1):319. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Optimal functioning of neuronal networks is critical to the complex cognitive processes of memory and executive function that deteriorate in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we use cellular and animal models as well as human biospecimens to show that AD-related stressors mediate global disturbances in dynamic intra- and inter-neuronal networks through pathologic rewiring of the chaperome system into epichaperomes. These structures provide the backbone upon which proteome-wide connectivity, and in turn, protein networks become disturbed and ultimately dysfunctional. We introduce the term protein connectivity-based dysfunction (PCBD) to define this mechanism. Among most sensitive to PCBD are pathways with key roles in synaptic plasticity. We show at cellular and target organ levels that network connectivity and functional imbalances revert to normal levels upon epichaperome inhibition. In conclusion, we provide proof-of-principle to propose AD is a PCBDopathy, a disease of proteome-wide connectivity defects mediated by maladaptive epichaperomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-14082-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6965647PMC
January 2020

HSP90-incorporating chaperome networks as biosensor for disease-related pathways in patient-specific midbrain dopamine neurons.

Nat Commun 2018 10 19;9(1):4345. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

The Center for Stem Cell Biology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, Box 256, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Environmental and genetic risk factors contribute to Parkinson's Disease (PD) pathogenesis and the associated midbrain dopamine (mDA) neuron loss. Here, we identify early PD pathogenic events by developing methodology that utilizes recent innovations in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) and chemical sensors of HSP90-incorporating chaperome networks. We show that events triggered by PD-related genetic or toxic stimuli alter the neuronal proteome, thereby altering the stress-specific chaperome networks, which produce changes detected by chemical sensors. Through this method we identify STAT3 and NF-κB signaling activation as examples of genetic stress, and phospho-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activation as an example of toxic stress-induced pathways in PD neurons. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of the stress chaperome network reversed abnormal phospho-STAT3 signaling and phospho-TH-related dopamine levels and rescued PD neuron viability. The use of chemical sensors of chaperome networks on hPSC-derived lineages may present a general strategy to identify molecular events associated with neurodegenerative diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06486-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195591PMC
October 2018

The epichaperome is an integrated chaperome network that facilitates tumour survival.

Nature 2016 Oct 5;538(7625):397-401. Epub 2016 Oct 5.

Department of Epidemiology-Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA.

Transient, multi-protein complexes are important facilitators of cellular functions. This includes the chaperome, an abundant protein family comprising chaperones, co-chaperones, adaptors, and folding enzymes-dynamic complexes of which regulate cellular homeostasis together with the protein degradation machinery. Numerous studies have addressed the role of chaperome members in isolation, yet little is known about their relationships regarding how they interact and function together in malignancy. As function is probably highly dependent on endogenous conditions found in native tumours, chaperomes have resisted investigation, mainly due to the limitations of methods needed to disrupt or engineer the cellular environment to facilitate analysis. Such limitations have led to a bottleneck in our understanding of chaperome-related disease biology and in the development of chaperome-targeted cancer treatment. Here we examined the chaperome complexes in a large set of tumour specimens. The methods used maintained the endogenous native state of tumours and we exploited this to investigate the molecular characteristics and composition of the chaperome in cancer, the molecular factors that drive chaperome networks to crosstalk in tumours, the distinguishing factors of the chaperome in tumours sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition, and the characteristics of tumours that may benefit from chaperome therapy. We find that under conditions of stress, such as malignant transformation fuelled by MYC, the chaperome becomes biochemically 'rewired' to form a network of stable, survival-facilitating, high-molecular-weight complexes. The chaperones heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70) are nucleating sites for these physically and functionally integrated complexes. The results indicate that these tightly integrated chaperome units, here termed the epichaperome, can function as a network to enhance cellular survival, irrespective of tissue of origin or genetic background. The epichaperome, present in over half of all cancers tested, has implications for diagnostics and also provides potential vulnerability as a target for drug intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature19807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5283383PMC
October 2016

Parkin and PINK1 Patient iPSC-Derived Midbrain Dopamine Neurons Exhibit Mitochondrial Dysfunction and α-Synuclein Accumulation.

Stem Cell Reports 2016 10 15;7(4):664-677. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-bio Science (SIMS), Soonchunhyang University, 25, Bongjeong-ro, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan-si 31151, Korea. Electronic address:

Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra; however, the mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD remains unclear. A subset of familial PD is linked to mutations in PARK2 and PINK1, which lead to dysfunctional mitochondria-related proteins Parkin and PINK1, suggesting that pathways implicated in these monogenic forms could play a more general role in PD. We demonstrate that the identification of disease-related phenotypes in PD-patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons depends on the type of differentiation protocol utilized. In a floor-plate-based but not a neural-rosette-based directed differentiation strategy, iPSC-derived mDA neurons recapitulate PD phenotypes, including pathogenic protein accumulation, cell-type-specific vulnerability, mitochondrial dysfunction, and abnormal neurotransmitter homeostasis. We propose that these form a pathogenic loop that contributes to disease. Our study illustrates the promise of iPSC technology for examining PD pathogenesis and identifying therapeutic targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2016.08.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5063469PMC
October 2016

Deriving human ENS lineages for cell therapy and drug discovery in Hirschsprung disease.

Nature 2016 Mar 10;531(7592):105-9. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

The Center for Stem Cell Biology, New York, New York 10065, USA.

The enteric nervous system (ENS) is the largest component of the autonomic nervous system, with neuron numbers surpassing those present in the spinal cord. The ENS has been called the 'second brain' given its autonomy, remarkable neurotransmitter diversity and complex cytoarchitecture. Defects in ENS development are responsible for many human disorders including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). HSCR is caused by the developmental failure of ENS progenitors to migrate into the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the distal colon. Human ENS development remains poorly understood owing to the lack of an easily accessible model system. Here we demonstrate the efficient derivation and isolation of ENS progenitors from human pluripotent stem (PS) cells, and their further differentiation into functional enteric neurons. ENS precursors derived in vitro are capable of targeted migration in the developing chick embryo and extensive colonization of the adult mouse colon. The in vivo engraftment and migration of human PS-cell-derived ENS precursors rescue disease-related mortality in HSCR mice (Ednrb(s-l/s-l)), although the mechanism of action remains unclear. Finally, EDNRB-null mutant ENS precursors enable modelling of HSCR-related migration defects, and the identification of pepstatin A as a candidate therapeutic target. Our study establishes the first, to our knowledge, human PS-cell-based platform for the study of human ENS development, and presents cell- and drug-based strategies for the treatment of HSCR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16951DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4846424PMC
March 2016

Functional Connectivity under Optogenetic Control Allows Modeling of Human Neuromuscular Disease.

Cell Stem Cell 2016 Jan 5;18(1):134-43. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

The Center for Stem Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY 10065, USA; Developmental Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Capturing the full potential of human pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neurons in disease modeling and regenerative medicine requires analysis in complex functional systems. Here we establish optogenetic control in human PSC-derived spinal motorneurons and show that co-culture of these cells with human myoblast-derived skeletal muscle builds a functional all-human neuromuscular junction that can be triggered to twitch upon light stimulation. To model neuromuscular disease we incubated these co-cultures with IgG from myasthenia gravis patients and active complement. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that selectively targets neuromuscular junctions. We saw a reversible reduction in the amplitude of muscle contractions, representing a surrogate marker for the characteristic loss of muscle strength seen in this disease. The ability to recapitulate key aspects of disease pathology and its symptomatic treatment suggests that this neuromuscular junction assay has significant potential for modeling of neuromuscular disease and regeneration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2015.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707991PMC
January 2016

Human iPSC-based modeling of late-onset disease via progerin-induced aging.

Cell Stem Cell 2013 Dec;13(6):691-705

The Center for Stem Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA; Developmental Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA; Gerstner Sloan-Kettering Graduate School, Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resets their identity back to an embryonic age and, thus, presents a significant hurdle for modeling late-onset disorders. In this study, we describe a strategy for inducing aging-related features in human iPSC-derived lineages and apply it to the modeling of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our approach involves expression of progerin, a truncated form of lamin A associated with premature aging. We found that expression of progerin in iPSC-derived fibroblasts and neurons induces multiple aging-related markers and characteristics, including dopamine-specific phenotypes such as neuromelanin accumulation. Induced aging in PD iPSC-derived dopamine neurons revealed disease phenotypes that require both aging and genetic susceptibility, such as pronounced dendrite degeneration, progressive loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, and enlarged mitochondria or Lewy-body-precursor inclusions. Thus, our study suggests that progerin-induced aging can be used to reveal late-onset age-related disease features in hiPSC-based disease models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.11.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153390PMC
December 2013

Regulatory chaperone complexes in neurodegenerative diseases: a perspective on therapeutic intervention.

Curr Alzheimer Res 2014 Jan;11(1):59-68

Molecular Pharmacology & Chemistry, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Associate Attending, Breast Cancer Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Hospital, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, ZRB2103, Associate Professor, Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences, New York, USA.

Protein folding, protein degradation, and protein stability are regulated by the molecular chaperones. Under pathogenic conditions, aberrant proteins can be dysfunctional, unregulated, or pathogenically mutated. These aberrant proteins are triaged by the chaperone network for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. These species, called chaperone client proteins, include the pathogenic factors of numerous neurodegenerative disorders, including tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein and LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease, SOD-1, TDP-43 and FUS in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and polyQ-expanded proteins such as huntingtin in Huntington's disease. In depth study of two molecular chaperones, Hsp90 and Hsc70, has led to a greater understanding of aberrant client fate and how retarding the chaperone system can promote clearance of these pathogenic clients. Here we discuss how chaperone interactions and small molecule inhibitors can regulate the burden of aberrant client signaling in these neurological disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1567205010666131119233044DOI Listing
January 2014

Synthesis and evaluation of cell-permeable biotinylated PU-H71 derivatives as tumor Hsp90 probes.

Beilstein J Org Chem 2013 15;9:544-556. Epub 2013 Mar 15.

Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.

The attachment of biotin to a small molecule provides a powerful tool in biology. Here, we present a systematic approach to identify biotinylated analogues of the Hsp90 inhibitor PU-H71 that are capable of permeating cell membranes so as to enable the investigation of Hsp90 complexes in live cells. The identified derivative 2g can isolate Hsp90 through affinity purification and, as we show, represents a unique and useful tool to probe tumor Hsp90 biology in live cells by affinity capture, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. To our knowledge, 2g is the only reported biotinylated Hsp90 probe to have such combined characteristics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3762/bjoc.9.60DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628991PMC
April 2013

Chaperone-dependent Neurodegeneration: A Molecular Perspective on Therapeutic Intervention.

J Alzheimers Dis Parkinsonism 2013 Apr;2013(Suppl 10)

Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, NY, USA.

Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is regulated by the molecular chaperones. Under pathogenic conditions, aberrant proteins are triaged by the chaperone network. These aberrant proteins, known as "clients," have major roles in the pathogenesis of numerous neurological disorders, including tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein and LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease, SOD-1, TDP-43 and FUS in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and polyQ-expanded proteins such as huntingtin in Huntington's disease. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of chemical compounds which inhibit the activity of molecular chaperones subsequently alter the fate of aberrant clients. Inhibition of Hsp90 and Hsc70, two major molecular chaperones, has led to a greater understanding of how chaperone triage decisions are made and how perturbing the chaperone system can promote clearance of these pathogenic clients. Described here are major pathways and components of several prominent neurological disorders. Also discussed is how treatment with chaperone inhibitors, predominately Hsp90 inhibitors which are selective for a diseased state, can relieve the burden of aberrant client signaling in these neurological disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2161-0460.S10-007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4172285PMC
April 2013

Behavioral characterization of cereblon forebrain-specific conditional null mice: a model for human non-syndromic intellectual disability.

Behav Brain Res 2012 Jan 4;226(2):428-34. Epub 2011 Oct 4.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Laboratory of Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.

A nonsense mutation in the human cereblon gene (CRBN) causes a mild type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability (ID). Animal studies show that crbn is a cytosolic protein with abundant expression in the hippocampus (HPC) and neocortex (CTX). Its diverse functions include the developmental regulation of ion channels at the neuronal synapse, the mediation of developmental programs by ubiquitination, and a target for herpes simplex type I virus in HPC neurons. To test the hypothesis that anomalous CRBN expression leads to HPC-mediated memory and learning deficits, we generated germ-line crbn knock-out mice (crbn(-/-)). We also inactivated crbn in forebrain neurons in conditional knock-out mice in which crbn exons 3 and 4 are deleted by cre recombinase under the direction of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha promoter (CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-)). crbn mRNA levels were negligible in the HPC, CTX, and cerebellum (CRBM) of the crbn(-/-) mice. In contrast, crbn mRNA levels were reduced 3- to 4-fold in the HPC, CTX but not in the CRBM in CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) mice as compared to wild type (CamKII(cre/+), crbn(+/+)). Contextual fear conditioning showed a significant decrease in the percentage of freezing time in CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) and crbn(-/-) mice while motor function, exploratory motivation, and anxiety-related behaviors were normal. These findings suggest that CamKII(cre/+), crbn(-/-) mice exhibit selective HPC-dependent deficits in associative learning and supports the use of these mice as in vivo models to study the functional consequences of CRBN aberrations on memory and learning in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.09.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5864115PMC
January 2012