Publications by authors named "Sarah J Schep"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treatment of acquired hemophilia A, a balancing act: results from a 27-year Dutch cohort study.

Am J Hematol 2021 01 10;96(1):51-59. Epub 2020 Oct 10.

Van Creveldkliniek, University Medical Center Utrecht, University Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a severe auto-immune bleeding disorder. Treatment of AHA is burdensome and optimal management is still unresolved. Therefore a retrospective nationwide multi-center cohort study (1992-2018) was performed to evaluate clinical presentation and treatment efficacy and safety of AHA in the Netherlands. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression analysis was used to study independent associations between patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. A total of 143 patients (median age 73 years; 52.4% male) were included with a median follow-up of 16.8 months (IQR 3.6-41.5 months). First-line immunosuppressive treatment was mostly steroid monotherapy (67.6%), steroids/cyclophosphamide (11.9%) and steroids/rituximab (11.9%), with success rates of 35.2%, 80.0% and 66.7% respectively, P < .05. Eventually 75% of patients achieved complete remission (CR). A high anti-FVIII antibody titer, severe bleeding and steroid monotherapy were associated with lower CR rates. Infections, the most important adverse event, occurred significantly more often with steroid combination therapy compared to steroids alone (38.7% vs 10.6%; P = .001). Overall mortality was 38.2%, mostly due to infections (19.2%) compared to 7.7% fatal bleeds. Advanced age, underlying malignancy and ICU admission were predictors for mortality. This study showed that AHA is characterized by significant disease-related and treatment-related morbidity and mortality. A high anti-FVIII titer, severe bleeding and steroid monotherapy were associated with a lower CR rate. The efficacy of steroid combination therapies however, was overshadowed by higher infection rates and infections represented the most important cause of death. The challenging and delicate balance between treatment effectivity and safety requires ongoing monitoring of AHA and further identification of prognostic markers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.26009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7756759PMC
January 2021

An update on the 'danger theory' in inhibitor development in hemophilia A.

Expert Rev Hematol 2019 05 25;12(5):335-344. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

a Van Creveldkliniek , University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University , Utrecht , The Netherlands.

Introduction: Nowadays, one of the most serious treatment complications in hemophilia A is the formation of neutralizing antibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). These so-called inhibitors develop in about 30% of all patients with severe hemophilia A. Once formed, inhibitors reduce FVIII efficacy in blood coagulation, which has a negative impact on patients' health and quality of life and significantly increases hemophilia A treatment costs. The pathophysiology of inhibitor development is a complex and multi-causal process, in which both genetic factors as well as environmental factors participate. So-called 'danger signals' are considered contributors to inhibitor formation, and can be triggered by surgery, joint bleeds or infections. A pro-inflammatory tissue micro-environment is thereby established, which is characterized by the upregulation of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), that can facilitate the alloimmunization to FVIII and thereby inhibitor formation. Here, the authors will discuss evidence from (pre)clinical studies about this theory in hemophilia A. Areas covered: In this review, the current knowledge regarding the 'danger theory' with regard to inhibitor development in hemophilia A is summarized. Expert opinion: Danger signals might contribute to inhibitor development; however, the evidence is scarce and not conclusive. Future studies, like multinational registries, are warranted but challenging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17474086.2019.1604213DOI Listing
May 2019

Health-related quality of life in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia.

Haematologica 2014 Sep 20;99(9):1525-31. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center/Wilhelmina's Children Hospital, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Despite its generally transient and benign course, childhood immune thrombocytopenia has a large impact on health-related quality of life. Recently published guidelines state that quality of life should be taken into account while making decisions on management in childhood immune thrombocytopenia. We, therefore, assessed health-related quality of life in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia in a prospective multicenter study. One hundred and seven children aged 6 months-16 years (mean age 5.57 years) were included. We used Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ and Kids' ITP Tools questionnaires at diagnosis and during standardized follow-up. Scores on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Core Scales were compared with those of healthy children. Relationships between health-related quality of life scores and treatment modality, bleeding tendency and course of the disease were examined. Kids' ITP Tools proxy reports and parent self-reports showed significant higher health-related quality of life scores in children who recovered than in children with persistent immune thrombocytopenia (at 3 months: Kids' ITP Tools parent self-report score 80.85 for recovered patients (n=69) versus 58.98 for patients with persistent disease (n=21), P<0.001). No significant differences in health-related quality of life were found between children with mild or moderate bleeding or between children who received intravenous immunoglobulin or children who were carefully observed. In conclusion, health-related quality of life of children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia is not influenced by treatment modality or bleeding severity, but only by clinical course of the disease. (Dutch Trial Register identifier: NTR TC1563).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2014.106963DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4562543PMC
September 2014