Publications by authors named "Sarah E Coe"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mucocutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Yucatan Minipig.

Toxicol Pathol 2021 Jul 30:1926233211036068. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

Charles River Laboratories, Mattawan, MI, USA.

Minipigs are commonly utilized in dermal toxicology studies, necessitating documentation of background findings, including neoplastic lesions. We describe a case of a Yucatan minipig with a squamous cell carcinoma at the mucocutaneous junction of the lip. The neoplasm appeared grossly as a slightly raised area of skin with ulceration. Histologically, there were nests and trabeculae of neoplastic squamous epithelial cells undergoing keratinization. Multifocally, rafts of these cells were within lymphatic vessels. Squamous cell carcinoma has not previously been reported in Yucatan or other laboratory minipigs, however, has been reported uncommonly in nonlaboratory pot-bellied pigs. Although squamous cell carcinoma has been associated with ultraviolet exposure or papillomavirus in various species, this was unable to be confirmed in this case.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/01926233211036068DOI Listing
July 2021

Transconjunctival excision of an orbital conjunctival cyst using computer-assisted 3-D surgical planning in a dog.

Clin Case Rep 2021 Jul 6;9(7):e04345. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine Purdue University West Lafayette IN USA.

Investigation of exophthalmos and blood-colored discharge from the left ventral punctum in a dog was consistent with a conjunctival cyst in the orbit. 3-D prints of the cyst and surrounding facial bones identified a successful transconjunctival approach without an orbitotomy and patency of the left lacrimal duct was reestablished.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.4345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8259931PMC
July 2021

Immunohistochemical characterization of mesothelioma in 6 large felids.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2021 Jul 13;33(4):767-771. Epub 2021 May 13.

Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Lansing, MI, USA.

Mesothelioma has been reported frequently in large felids. These neoplasms present a diagnostic challenge given their highly variable morphology that mimics carcinomas or sarcomas at different locations. Our goal was to characterize mesotheliomas morphologically and immunohistochemically to determine if a panel of antibodies could be used to more accurately support the diagnosis of these neoplasms in large felids. Mesotheliomas from 6 large felids, including 4 clouded leopards, 1 Bengal tiger, and 1 cheetah, were immunohistochemically labeled for vimentin, E-cadherin, pancytokeratin, Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), MUC-1, and calretinin. The mesotheliomas of the 4 clouded leopards and the tiger were of the epithelial subtype; the mesothelioma from the cheetah was biphasic. All 6 mesotheliomas had strong immunohistochemical labeling for vimentin, E-cadherin, and pancytokeratin. All cases had cytoplasmic labeling for WT1, and 2 also had nuclear labeling. The 3 mesotheliomas with distinct papillary fronds were weakly positive for MUC-1. These and one other epithelial mesothelioma were also positive for calretinin. Our study demonstrates that the morphologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes of mesothelioma that have been identified in humans and domestic species can occur in large felids, and a panel of pancytokeratin, vimentin, WT1, and calretinin can be utilized to support the diagnosis of these neoplasms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10406387211015640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8229833PMC
July 2021
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