Publications by authors named "Sarah C Griffin"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Investigating the Influence of Spatiotemporal Gait Characteristics on Shoe Wear Rate.

IISE Trans Occup Ergon Hum Factors 2021 Nov 29:1-6. Epub 2021 Nov 29.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

OCCUPATIONAL APPLICATIONSWe investigated the association between shoe wear rate and several metrics describing an individual's spatiotemporal gait characteristics (cadence, step length, and preferred walking speed). No associations were found, indicating that alternative metrics should be investigated to predict the individualized rate at which workers wear down shoe tread.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2021

Reciprocal effects between depressive symptoms and pain in veterans over 50.

Pain Med 2021 Oct 13. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Durham Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Durham, NC.

Objective: Depression and chronic pain are major problems in American veterans, yet there is limited long-term research examining how they relate to one another in this population. This study examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and pain in U.S. veterans aged 50+.

Methods: This study used data on veterans from the 2002-2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (n = 4,302), a large-scale observational study of Americans aged 50+. Measures included a short form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and two items assessing the presence and degree of pain. Analyses included random intercept cross-lagged panel models (RI-CLPM).

Results: In the RI-CLPM, there were roughly equivalent cross-lagged effects between depressive symptoms and pain. There was also evidence that depressive symptoms and pain have a trait-like component and that these trait-like characteristics are associated.

Conclusions: These findings indicate that depressive symptoms and pain in veterans are stable characteristics in American veterans over 50. There appear to be reciprocal effects between the two, whereby deviations in one's typical depressive symptoms predict subsequent deviations in one's pain level and vice-versa; however, the size of these effects is very small. These findings suggest that clinicians should treat both depressive symptoms and pain, rather than assume that treatment benefits in one domain will lead to major benefits in another.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnab294DOI Listing
October 2021

Characteristics of phantom limb pain in U.S. civilians and service members.

Scand J Pain 2021 Sep 17. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Objectives: The population of Americans with limb loss is on the rise, with a different profile than in previous generations (e.g., greater incidence of amputation due to diabetes). This study aimed to identify the key characteristics of phantom limb sensation (PLS) and pain (PLP) in a current sample of Americans with limb loss.

Methods: This cross-sectional study is the first large-scale (n=649) study on PLP in the current population of Americans with limb loss. A convenience sample of military and civilian persons missing one or more major limbs was surveyed regarding their health history and experience with phantom limb phenomena.

Results: Of the participants surveyed, 87% experienced PLS and 82% experienced PLP. PLS and PLP typically first occurred immediately after amputation (47% of cases), but for a small percentage (3-4%) onset did not occur until over a year after amputation. Recent PLP severity decreased over time (β=0.028, 95% CI: -0.05-0.11), but most participants reported PLP even 10 years after amputation. Higher levels of recent PLP were associated with telescoping (β=0.123, 95% CI: 0.04-0.21) and higher levels of pre-amputation pain (β=0.104, 95% CI: 0.03-0.18). Those with congenitally missing limbs experienced lower levels of recent PLP (t (37.93)=3.93, p<0.01) but there were no consistent differences in PLP between other amputation etiologies.

Conclusions: Phantom limb phenomena are common and enduring. Telescoping and pre-amputation pain are associated with higher PLP. Persons with congenitally missing limbs experience lower levels of PLP than those with amputation(s), yet PLP is common even in this subpopulation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/sjpain-2021-0139DOI Listing
September 2021

Sleep disturbance and pain in U.S. adults over 50: evidence for reciprocal, longitudinal effects.

Sleep Med 2021 10 13;86:32-39. Epub 2021 Aug 13.

Durham Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Durham, NC, USA; Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Durham Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

Objective: To examine the relationship between sleep disturbance and pain over a 14-year period.

Methods: This study used data from the 2002-2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), an observational study of U.S. adults over age 50 (n = 17,756). Sleep disturbance was measured via four items (assessing difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up too early as well as restedness) and pain via two items assessing the presence and degree of pain. Analyses consisted of path analysis; more specifically, random intercept cross-lagged panel modeling (RI-CLPM) was used to examine how pain and sleep disturbance predict one another over two-year intervals after accounting for the trait-like nature of both factors.

Results: There was evidence of reciprocal effects between sleep disturbance and pain across some, but not all, intervals. Moreover, the latent variables representing the trait-like nature of sleep disturbance and pain both showed significant variance (p < 0.001), indicating stable differences between persons in sleep and pain. These trait-like characteristics were strongly associated (β = 0.51, p < 0.001). The findings remained after adjusting the model for baseline age, self-reported health, partner status, depression, years of education, and sex.

Conclusion: Sleep disturbance and pain are stable experiences. Moreover, there was some evidence that sleep disturbance and pain are bidirectionally linked across time among adults over 50, whereby across some intervals deviations in one's typical level of sleep disturbance predicted corresponding deviations in one's typical level of pain and vice versa. Clinically, this comorbidity and potential longitudinal bidirectionality underscore the importance of evidence-based interventions that target both sleep and pain among older individuals. Further studies should replicate these findings by collecting validated and/or objective sleep and pain measures on a more frequent basis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2021.08.006DOI Listing
October 2021

Mental health and demographic correlates of loneliness after left ventricular assist device implantation.

Int J Artif Organs 2021 Dec 24;44(12):1039-1043. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Loneliness is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, and hospital readmission, yet there are no studies to our knowledge examining loneliness in left ventricular assistance device (LVAD) patients. This study used a cross-sectional survey design on a convenience sample of LVAD patients ( = 73). Logistic regression was used to identify demographic correlates of loneliness; linear regression was used to examine the relationship between loneliness and both stress and depression. Loneliness was measured via the loneliness item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD), depression via the CESD (excluding the loneliness item), and stress via the Perceived Stress Scale. In bivariate analyses, older age (OR per year = 0.958, 95%CI = 0.919-0.998) and being partnered (OR = 0.245, 95%CI = 0.083-0.724) were associated with less loneliness. In the multivariate model, there was an interaction effect between age and partnership ( = 0.0212), where older age was protective against loneliness for non-partnered, but not partnered, patients. Higher loneliness was associated with higher stress (β = 0.484,  = 5.687, 95%CI = 3.195-8.178) and depression (β = 0.618,  = 7.544, 95%CI = 5.241-9.848). Patients who are not partnered and younger may be at increased risk of loneliness after LVAD. Loneliness in turn is associated with higher stress and depression. Longitudinal research is necessary to speak to direction of effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0391398821997840DOI Listing
December 2021

Mental health and demographic correlates of loneliness after left ventricular assist device implantation.

Int J Artif Organs 2021 Dec 24;44(12):1039-1043. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Loneliness is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, and hospital readmission, yet there are no studies to our knowledge examining loneliness in left ventricular assistance device (LVAD) patients. This study used a cross-sectional survey design on a convenience sample of LVAD patients ( = 73). Logistic regression was used to identify demographic correlates of loneliness; linear regression was used to examine the relationship between loneliness and both stress and depression. Loneliness was measured via the loneliness item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD), depression via the CESD (excluding the loneliness item), and stress via the Perceived Stress Scale. In bivariate analyses, older age (OR per year = 0.958, 95%CI = 0.919-0.998) and being partnered (OR = 0.245, 95%CI = 0.083-0.724) were associated with less loneliness. In the multivariate model, there was an interaction effect between age and partnership ( = 0.0212), where older age was protective against loneliness for non-partnered, but not partnered, patients. Higher loneliness was associated with higher stress (β = 0.484,  = 5.687, 95%CI = 3.195-8.178) and depression (β = 0.618,  = 7.544, 95%CI = 5.241-9.848). Patients who are not partnered and younger may be at increased risk of loneliness after LVAD. Loneliness in turn is associated with higher stress and depression. Longitudinal research is necessary to speak to direction of effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0391398821997840DOI Listing
December 2021

Sleep Disturbance Mediates the Association Between Loneliness and Health in Older Americans.

Int J Behav Med 2021 Feb;28(1):64-72

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 806 West Franklin St, Richmond, VA, 23223, USA.

Background: As the research documenting loneliness as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality continues to grow, it becomes increasingly critical to understand the mechanics of this relationship. This study assessed whether sleep disturbance mediates the relationship between loneliness and health.

Method: Data came from the 2006, 2010, and 2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, a longitudinal study of older Americans; participants ≥ 65 who completed the Psychosocial and Lifestyle Questionnaire in 2006 were included (n = 5067). Measures include the Hughes loneliness scales, a modified version of the Jenkins sleep scale, and self-reported health. Cross-lagged mediation models (i.e., path analysis) were used to model the relationships between loneliness, sleep disturbance, and self-reported health over the 8-year span.

Results: Loneliness predicted subsequent sleep disturbance, which in turn predicted subsequent self-reported health. Moreover, there was evidence of both direct and indirect effects (via sleep disturbance) of loneliness on self-reported health. These effects remained after controlling for demographics, isolation, and depression.

Conclusion: Sleep disturbance partially mediates the relationship between loneliness and self-reported health over 8 years. These findings are not attributable to isolation or depression. Further research is necessary to develop and assess a more comprehensive model of how loneliness shapes health. This study indicates that targeting sleep disturbance may mitigate the health risks of loneliness in older Americans.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-020-09897-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680384PMC
February 2021

Loneliness and sleep: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Health Psychol Open 2020 Jan-Jun;7(1):2055102920913235. Epub 2020 Apr 4.

Virginia Commonwealth University, USA.

Despite the mounting evidence linking loneliness with health, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain obscure. This systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between loneliness and one potential mechanism-sleep-identified 27 relevant articles. Loneliness correlated with self-reported sleep disturbance ( = .28, 95% confidence interval (.24, .33)) but not duration, across a diverse set of samples and measures. There was no evidence supporting age or gender as moderators or suggesting publication bias. The longitudinal relationship between loneliness and sleep remains unclear. Loneliness is related to sleep disturbance, but research is necessary to determine directionality, examine the influence of other factors, and speak to causality.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2055102920913235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7139193PMC
April 2020

Reciprocal Effects Between Loneliness and Sleep Disturbance in Older Americans.

J Aging Health 2020 10 21;32(9):1156-1164. Epub 2019 Dec 21.

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA.

To model the relationship between loneliness and sleep disturbance over time. : Data came from the Health and Retirement Study (2006, 2010, 2014 waves; age ≥ 65 years; = 5,067). Loneliness was measured via the Hughes Loneliness Scale and sleep disturbance via a four-item scale assessing sleep and restedness. Cross-lagged panel modeling (path analysis) was used to jointly examine reciprocal effects between loneliness and sleep disturbance. : Higher loneliness correlated with higher sleep disturbance at baseline. There was evidence of reciprocal effects between loneliness and sleep across timepoints. These associations overall remained when accounting for demographics, objective isolation, and depression. : Although causality cannot be established, the findings indicate that the relationship between loneliness and sleep disturbance is bidirectional. This requires revision to the current theory on sleep disturbance as a mechanism for the relationship between loneliness and health and indicates that effective treatment of sleep disturbance may reduce loneliness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0898264319894486DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7309370PMC
October 2020

Psychological Interventions for Late-life Insomnia: Current and Emerging Science.

Curr Sleep Med Rep 2018 Dec 12;4(4):268-277. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 842018, Richmond, VA 23284-2018,

Purpose Of Review: Late-life insomnia is a serious medical condition associated with many untoward consequences. The high prevalence of late-life insomnia, along with the concomitant risks inherent in the use of hypnotic medications in older adults necessitates non-pharmacological (i.e., psychological) treatment options. We aim to summarize and evaluate the state-of-the-science of psychological treatment options for late-life insomnia.

Recent Findings: Cumulative scientific evidence suggests the efficacy of psychological treatment of late-life insomnia. During the previous decade, trials of psychological treatments for insomnia have begun to test various modifications to treatments that have the potential to improve access for older adults, along with expanding their focus to include individuals with comorbid conditions that are common to older adults. While these modifications represent positive advances in the science of treatment for late-life insomnia, the evidence is still largely explanatory/efficacious in nature.

Summary: Psychological strategies represent the best approaches for the treatment of late-life insomnia. Future investigations would be wise to progressively move towards increasingly pragmatic/effectiveness investigations, adding to the literature base regarding the treatment of late-life insomnia under usual/real-world conditions as opposed to ideal/artificial conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40675-018-0129-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6519733PMC
December 2018

Insomnia Disorder and Behaviorally Induced Insufficient Sleep Syndrome: Prevalence and Relationship to Depression in College Students.

Behav Sleep Med 2020 Mar-Apr;18(2):275-286. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

: College students are at increased risk for sleep disorders, including insomnia disorder and obtaining less than 6.5 hr of sleep per night by choice, or behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome (BIISS). These disorders can have deleterious daytime consequences, including depression. This study aims to establish the prevalence of insomnia and BIISS disorders and examine associations of insomnia and BIISS with other sleep characteristics and depression. : A subset of data from Spit for Science, a college risk behaviors and health study ( = 989) was used. Insomnia and BIISS were defined as mutually exclusive disorders, based on diagnostic criteria. : A majority (68%) of students were categorized as normal sleepers, followed by insomnia (22%), and BIISS (10%). Sleep duration was comparable between BIISS and insomnia, while daytime sleepiness was significantly higher in BIISS, and sleep latency was longer in insomnia ( = 44 vs. = 13 min). Insomnia was associated with the highest depression symptoms, followed by BIISS, and normal sleep, controlling for demographics. Insomnia was associated with twice the risk of moderate or higher depression compared to normal sleep (CI: 1.60, 2.70, < .001). : These findings highlight the sleep difficulties endemic to college populations. Further, this study provides the first prevalence estimation of BIISS in college students and the first comparison of insomnia and BIISS on sleep characteristics and depressive symptoms. This study underscores the importance of targeted screening and intervention to improve both sleep and depression in this vulnerable population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15402002.2019.1578772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814500PMC
June 2020

Isolation, Not Loneliness or Cynical Hostility, Predicts Cognitive Decline in Older Americans.

J Aging Health 2020 Jan-Feb;32(1):52-60. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA.

To jointly examine isolation, loneliness, and cynical hostility as risk factors for cognitive decline in older adults. Data came from the 2006 to 2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal study of U.S. older adults (age ⩾ 65 years, = 6,654). Measures included frequency of contact with social network (objective isolation), the Hughes Loneliness Scale (loneliness), a modified version of the Cook-Medley Hostility Inventory (cynical hostility), and a modified version of the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (cognitive function). Multilevel modeling (random slope + intercept) was used to examine the association between these factors and trajectories of cognitive function. After controlling for demographic characteristics, self-reported health, and functional limitations, loneliness (β = -.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [-0.56, -0.11), and cynical hostility (β = -.14, 95% CI = [-0.24, -0.04) correlated with lower cognitive function, but none predicted change in cognitive function. Objective social isolation was associated with lower cognitive function (β = -.27, 95% CI = [-0.41, -0.12]) and steeper decline in cognitive function (β = -.09, 95% CI = [-0.16, -0.01]).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0898264318800587DOI Listing
November 2020

Trajectory of phantom limb pain relief using mirror therapy: Retrospective analysis of two studies.

Scand J Pain 2017 04 7;15:98-103. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

University of Tennessee Health Science CenterMemphisTN 38163United States.

Background And Purpose: Research indicates that mirror therapy reduces phantom limb pain (PLP). Objectives were to determine when mirror therapy works in those who respond to treatment, the relevance of baseline PLP to when pain relief occurs, and what pain symptoms respond to mirror therapy.

Methods: Data from two independent cohorts with unilateral lower limb amputation were analyzed for this study (n=33). Mirror therapy consisted of 15-min sessions in which amputees performed synchronous movements of the phantom and intact legs/feet. PLP was measured using a visual analogue scale and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire.

Results: The severity of PLP at the beginning of treatment predicted when pain relief occurred. Those with low baseline PLP experienced a reduction (p<0.05) in PLP by session 7 of treatment, those with medium baseline PLP experienced pain relief by session 14 of treatment, and those with high baseline PLP experienced pain relief by session 21 of treatment. Mirror therapy reduced throbbing, shooting, stabbing, sharp, cramping, aching, tender, splitting, tiring/exhausting, and punishing-cruel pain symptoms.

Conclusion: The degree of PLP at baseline predicts when mirror therapy relieves pain.

Implications: This article indicates that the degree of baseline PLP affects when mirror therapy relieves pain: relief occurs by session 7 in patients with low PLP but by session 21 in patients with high PLP. Clinicians should anticipate slower pain relief in patients who begin treatment with high levels of pain. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers:NCT00623818 and NCT00662415.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.01.007DOI Listing
April 2017

Observation of limb movements reduces phantom limb pain in bilateral amputees.

Ann Clin Transl Neurol 2014 Sep 30;1(9):633-8. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

US Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 7700 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church, Virginia, 22042 ; Department of Neurology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Rm A1036, Bethesda, Maryland, 20814.

Background: Mirror therapy has been demonstrated to reduce phantom limb pain (PLP) experienced by unilateral limb amputees. Research suggests that the visual feedback of observing a limb moving in the mirror is critical for therapeutic efficacy.

Objective: Since mirror therapy is not an option for bilateral lower limb amputees, the purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of another person's limbs could be used to relieve PLP.

Methods: We randomly assigned 20 bilateral lower limb amputees with PLP to visual observation (n = 11) or mental visualization (n = 9) treatment. Treatment consisted of seven discrete movements which were mimicked by the amputee's phantom limbs moving while visually observing the experimenter's limbs moving, or closing the eyes while visualizing and attempting the movements with their phantom limbs, respectively. Participants performed movements for 20 min daily for 1 month. Response to therapy was measured using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Short-Form Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ).

Results: Direct visual observation significantly reduced PLP in both legs (P < 0.05). Amputees assigned to the mental visualization condition did not show a significant reduction in PLP.

Interpretation: Direct visual observation therapy is an inexpensive and effective treatment for PLP that is accessible to bilateral lower limb amputees.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acn3.89DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4241790PMC
September 2014

A mechanism-based classification of phantom limb pain.

Pain 2014 Nov 21;155(11):2236-2242. Epub 2014 May 21.

Department of Rehabilitation, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA Department of Neurology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2014.05.016DOI Listing
November 2014

Neurology and the military: Five new things.

Neurol Clin Pract 2013 Feb;3(1):30-38

US Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (JWT), Falls Church, VA; Department of Neurology (JWT, GSFL), F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda; Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (ALA, SCG), Bethesda, MD; and Harvard Medical School (IRY), Boston, MA.

The current Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts have seen the highest survival rates in US service members ever, despite staggering numbers of traumatic brain injury and limb loss cases. The improvement in survival can be attributed at least in part to advances in far-forward, rapid medical treatment, including the administration of hypertonic saline solutions and decompressive craniectomies to manage elevated intracranial pressure. After evacuation to military hospitals in the continental United States, service members who have had limb loss face extensive rehabilitation. The growing amputee population has led to a burgeoning interest in the treatment of phantom limb pain and in the development of advanced prostheses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/CPJ.0b013e318283ffa2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765939PMC
February 2013

Analysis of injuries from the Army Ten Miler: A 6-year retrospective review.

Mil Med 2013 Jan;178(1):55-60

Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5600, USA.

A number of long-distance running events are held each year in the United States; the Army Ten Miler (ATM) is one such race held annually in Washington, DC. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively analyze medical encounters for runners participating in the ATM from 1998 to 2004. Of the estimated 91,750 runners over the 6-year period, 73,100 participants finished the race and were included in the data analysis. Demographic and injury data were collected from medical records of participants who received medical care while participating in the ATM, and injury-related factors were assessed. The most common category of injury was musculoskeletal (44%), followed by medical-related problems (27%) and dermatological injuries (27%). Similar to marathon and ironman races, ATM injury rates correlate with race-day temperature and dew point. Overall, however, the injury rates observed at the ATM were relatively low compared to those reported for longer distance events. Finally, we detail the medical coverage provided at the ATM, as this coverage could be used as a guide for similarly distanced races.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7205/milmed-d-11-00447DOI Listing
January 2013

Advanced rehabilitation techniques for the multi-limb amputee.

J Surg Orthop Adv 2012 ;21(1):50-7

Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Advances in combat casualty care have contributed to unprecedented survival rates of battlefield injuries, challenging the field of rehabilitation to help injured service members achieve maximal functional recovery and independence. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the care of the multiple-limb amputee. Specialized medical, surgical, and rehabilitative interventions are needed to optimize the care of this unique patient population. This article describes lessons learned at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda in providing advanced therapy and prosthetics for combat casualties, but provides guidelines for all providers involved in the care of individuals with amputation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2012
-->