Publications by authors named "Sara Seyedali"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis: a rare neurological complication of systemic lupus erythematosus.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Apr 25;12(4). Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Medicine/Rheumatology, Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, New Jersey, USA.

We present a 47-year-old woman with recently diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus who developed progressive numbness and tingling of her upper and lower extremities, followed by weakness and difficulty ambulating. She was diagnosed with longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis involving her entire cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Infectious workup was unrevealing. She failed to respond to pulse-dose intravenous steroids, but slowly improved with the addition of plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide. Following maintenance treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and slow tapering of oral steroids, she has maintained complete remission with significant recovery of neurological function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2018-228950DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6505983PMC
April 2019

Hypertension Treatment in Blacks: Discussion of the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines.

Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2016 Nov - Dec;59(3):282-288. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016.

Blacks are especially susceptible to hypertension (HTN) and its associated organ damage leading to adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal outcomes. Accordingly, HTN is particularly significant in contributing to the black-white racial differences in health outcomes in the US. As such, in order to address these health disparities, practical clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on how to treat HTN, specifically in blacks, are needed. This review article is a timely addition to the literature because the most recent U.S. CPG more explicitly emphasizes race into the algorithmic management of HTN. However, recent clinical research cautions that use of race as a proxy to determine therapeutic response to pharmaceutical agents may be erroneous. This review will address the implications of the use of race in the hypertension CPGs. We will review the rationale behind the introduction of race into the U.S. CPG and the level of evidence that was available to justify this introduction. Finally, we will conclude with practical considerations in the treatment of HTN in blacks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2016.09.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5467735PMC
May 2017