Publications by authors named "Sara Ross-Howe"

2 Publications

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Magneto-nanosensor smartphone platform for the detection of HIV and leukocytosis at point-of-care.

Nanomedicine 2019 02 28;16:10-19. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

The advent of personalized medicine has brought an increased interest in personal health among general consumers. As a result, there is a great need for user-centric point-of-care (POC) health devices. Such devices are equally pertinent in developing countries or resource-limited settings for performing diagnostic tests. However, current POC tests for diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or leukocytosis do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity or do not exist at all. Here, we extend our mobile magneto-nanosensor platform to point-of-care HIV and leukocytosis detection. The platform can be multiplexed, and the circuitry enables portability and sensitivity in the POC setting. A smartphone application simplifies operation and provides guidance to facilitate self-testing. Commercially available POC test kits typically provide only qualitative or semi-quantitative results of a single analyte. The magneto-nanosensor platform can provide users with pleasant user-experience while demonstrating robust sensitive and specific multiplexed quantification and detection of common diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2018.11.007DOI Listing
February 2019

Postoperative Remote Automated Monitoring: Need for and State of the Science.

Can J Cardiol 2018 07 25;34(7):850-862. Epub 2018 Apr 25.

McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Worldwide, more than 230 million adults have major noncardiac surgery each year. Although surgery can improve quality and duration of life, it can also precipitate major complications. Moreover, a substantial proportion of deaths occur after discharge. Current systems for monitoring patients postoperatively, on surgical wards and after transition to home, are inadequate. On the surgical ward, vital signs evaluation usually occurs only every 4-8 hours. Reduced in-hospital ward monitoring, followed by no vital signs monitoring at home, leads to thousands of cases of undetected/delayed detection of hemodynamic compromise. In this article we review work to date on postoperative remote automated monitoring on surgical wards and strategy for advancing this field. Key considerations for overcoming current barriers to implementing remote automated monitoring in Canada are also presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2018.04.021DOI Listing
July 2018