Publications by authors named "Sara Orsini"

8 Publications

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The ISTH bleeding assessment tool as predictor of bleeding events in inherited platelet disorders: Communication from the ISTH SSC Subcommittee on Platelet Physiology.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 May;19(5):1364-1371

Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Background: The ISTH Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) has been validated for clinical screening of suspected von Willebrand disease (VWD) and for bleeding prediction. Recently it has been validated for subjects with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) (BAT-VAL study).

Objectives: To determine whether the ISTH-BAT bleeding score (BS) predicts subsequent bleeding events requiring treatment in IPD patients.

Methods: Patients with IPD, type 1 VWD (VWD-1) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in the BAT-VAL study were prospectively followed-up for 2 years and bleeding episodes requiring treatment were recorded.

Results: Of the 1098 subjects initially enrolled, 955 were followed-up and 124 suffered hemorrhages during follow-up, 60% of whom had inherited platelet function disorders (IPFD). Total number of events was significantly higher in IPFD (n = 235) than VWD-1 (n = 52) or inherited thrombocytopenia (IT; n = 20). Events requiring transfusions were 66% in IPFD, 5.7% in VWD-1, and 3% in IT. Baseline BS was significantly higher in IPFD patients with a bleeding event at follow-up than in those without (p < .01) and the percentage of subjects suffering a bleeding event increased proportionally to baseline BS quartile. A significant association between the BS and the chance of suffering severe bleeding was found in the overall, IPFD, and VWD-1 populations. Similar results were obtained for the pediatric population.

Conclusions: Inherited platelet function disorder patients with high BS at enrollment are more likely to suffer from bleeding events requiring treatment at follow-up. Moreover, the higher the baseline BS quartile the greater the incidence of subsequent events, suggesting that independently from diagnosis a high BS is associated with a greater risk of subsequent hemorrhage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15263DOI Listing
May 2021

Validation of the ISTH/SSC bleeding assessment tool for inherited platelet disorders: A communication from the Platelet Physiology SSC.

J Thromb Haemost 2020 03 16;18(3):732-739. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Background: Careful assessment of bleeding history is the first step in the evaluation of patients with mild/moderate bleeding disorders, and the use of a bleeding assessment tool (BAT) is strongly encouraged. Although a few studies have assessed the utility of the ISTH-BAT in patients with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFD) none of them was sufficiently large to draw conclusions and/or included appropriate control groups.

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to test the utility of the ISTH-BAT in a large cohort of patients with a well-defined diagnosis of inherited platelets disorder in comparison with two parallel cohorts, one of patients with type-1 von Willebrand disease (VWD-1) and one of healthy controls (HC).

Patients/methods: We enrolled 1098 subjects, 482 of whom had inherited platelet disorders (196 IPFD and 286 inherited platelet number disorders [IT]) from 17 countries.

Results: IPFD patients had significantly higher bleeding score (BS; median 9) than VWD-1 patients (median 5), a higher number of hemorrhagic symptoms (4 versus 3), and higher percentage of patients with clinically relevant symptoms (score > 2). The ISTH-BAT showed excellent discrimination power between IPFD and HC (0.9 < area under the curve [AUC] < 1), moderate (0.7 < AUC < 0.9) between IPFD and VWD-1 and between IPFD and inherited thrombocytopenia (IT), while it was inaccurate (AUC ≤ 0.7) in discriminating IT from HC.

Conclusions: The ISTH-BAT allows to efficiently discriminate IPFD from HC, while it has lower accuracy in distinguishing IPFD from VWD-1. Therefore, the ISTH-BAT appears useful for identifying subjects requiring laboratory evaluation for a suspected IPFD once VWD is preliminarily excluded.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.14683DOI Listing
March 2020

Antithrombotic prophylaxis for surgery-associated venous thromboembolism risk in patients with inherited platelet disorders. The SPATA-DVT Study.

Haematologica 2020 07 26;105(7):1948-1956. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Department of Transfusion and Cell Transplantation Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan.

Major surgery is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), thus the application of mechanical or pharmacologic prophylaxis is recommended. The incidence of VTE in patients with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) undergoing surgical procedures is unknown and no information on the current use and safety of thromboprophylaxis, particularly of low-molecular-weight-heparin in these patients is available. Here we explored the approach to thromboprophylaxis and thrombotic outcomes in IPD patients undergoing surgery at VTE-risk participating in the multicenter SPATA study. We evaluated 210 surgical procedures carried out in 155 patients with well-defined forms of IPD (VTE-risk: 31% high, 28.6% intermediate, 25.2% low, 15.2% very low). The use of thromboprophylaxis was low (23.3% of procedures), with higher prevalence in orthopedic and gynecological surgeries, and was related to VTE-risk. The most frequently employed thromboprophylaxis was mechanical and appeared to be effective, as no patients developed thrombosis, including patients belonging to the highest VTE-risk classes. Low-molecular-weight-heparin use was low (10.5%) and it did not influence the incidence of post-surgical bleeding or of antihemorrhagic prohemostatic interventions use. Two thromboembolic events were registered, both occurring after high VTE-risk procedures in patients who did not receive thromboprophylaxis (4.7%). Our findings suggest that VTE incidence is low in patients with IPD undergoing surgery at VTE-risk and that it is predicted by the Caprini score. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis may be of benefit in patients with IPD undergoing invasive procedures at VTE-risk and low-molecular-weight-heparin should be considered for major surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2019.227876DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7327644PMC
July 2020

Rituximab-induced IgG hypogammaglobulinemia in children with nephrotic syndrome and normal pre-treatment IgG values.

World J Clin Cases 2019 May;7(9):1021-1027

Department of Woman, Child and of General and Specialized Surgery, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Napoli 80138, Italy.

Background: In paediatric patients with complicated nephrotic syndrome (NS), rituximab (RTX) administration can induce persistent IgG hypogammaglobulinemia among subjects showing low basal immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels.

Aim: To evaluate the effect of RTX on IgG levels and infections in patients with complicated NS and normal basal IgG levels.

Methods: We consecutively enrolled all patients with complicated NS and normal basal IgG levels undergoing the first RTX infusion from January 2008 to January 2016. Basal IgG levels were dosed after 6 wk of absent proteinuria and with a maximal interval of 3 mo before RTX infusion. The primary outcome was the onset of IgG hypogammaglobulinemia during the follow-up according to the IgG normal values for age [mean ± standard deviation (SD)].

Results: We enrolled 20 patients with mean age at NS diagnosis of 4.2 ± 3.3 years. The mean age at the first RTX infusion was 10.9 ± 3.5 years. Eleven out of twenty patients (55%) developed IgG hypogammaglobulinemia. None of these patients showed severe or recurrent infections. Only one patient suffered from recurrent acute otitis media and underwent substitutive IgG infusion. Three patients undergoing only the two "starting doses" experienced normalization of IgG levels. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, the cumulative proportion of patients free of IgG hypogammaglobulinemia was 57.8% after the first RTX dose, 51.5% after the third dose, 44.1% after the fourth dose, and 35.5% after the fifth dose.

Conclusion: RTX can induce IgG hypogammaglobulinemia in patients with pre-RTX IgG normal values. None of the treated patients showed severe infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v7.i9.1021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6511933PMC
May 2019

Effect of aspirin treatment on abacavir-associated platelet hyperreactivity in HIV-infected patients.

Int J Cardiol 2018 07 12;263:118-124. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Department of Medicine, Section of Internal and Cardiovascular Medicine, University Perugia, Italy. Electronic address:

Background: Ischemic cardiovascular events are a relevant cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. Use of abacavir (ABC), a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor, has been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and with platelet hyperreactivity. We explored whether low-dose aspirin reduces in vivo platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity induced by ABC in HIV-infected subjects.

Methods And Results: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study forty HIV-infected patients with ABC-associated platelet hyperreactivity, defined by a score based on laboratory variables reflecting in vivo platelet activation and ex vivo platelet hyperresponsiveness, were randomized to aspirin 100 mg daily for 15 days with subsequent cross-over to placebo for additional 15 days or placebo for 15 days with subsequent cross-over to aspirin for further 15 days. In vivo and ex vivo platelet activation markers were measured at day 15 and 30. One group of healthy subjects, one of untreated HIV infected-patients and one treated without ABC, were studied concomitantly. Serum TxB and urinary 11-dehydro-TxB were decreased by aspirin in ABC-treated patients, but not as much as in healthy controls. Aspirin therapy reduced significantly platelet hyperreactivity (score: from 9.3, 95% CIs 8.7 to 10.0, to 7.5, 6.9 to 8.0), however without bringing it back to the levels of healthy controls (score: 4.6, 95% CIs 3.6 to 5.6).

Conclusion: Aspirin reduces ABC-induced in vivo platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity in HIV-infected patients, however without normalizing them. Whether the observed reduction of platelet activation is sufficient to prevent cardiovascular events requires a prospective trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.04.052DOI Listing
July 2018

Bleeding risk of surgery and its prevention in patients with inherited platelet disorders.

Haematologica 2017 07 6;102(7):1192-1203. Epub 2017 Apr 6.

Hematology Department, S. Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy.

Excessive bleeding at surgery is a feared complication in patients with inherited platelet disorders. However, very few studies have evaluated the frequency of surgical bleeding in these hemorrhagic disorders. We performed a worldwide, multicentric, retrospective study to assess the bleeding complications of surgery, the preventive and therapeutic approaches adopted, and their efficacy in patients with inherited platelet disorders: the Surgery in Platelet disorders And Therapeutic Approach (SPATA) study. We rated the outcome of 829 surgical procedures carried out in 423 patients with well-defined forms of inherited platelet disorders: 238 inherited platelet function disorders and 185 inherited platelet number disorders. Frequency of surgical bleeding was high in patients with inherited platelet disorders (19.7%), with a significantly higher bleeding incidence in inherited platelet function disorders (24.8%) than in inherited platelet number disorders (13.4%). The frequency of bleeding varied according to the type of inherited platelet disorder, with biallelic Bernard Soulier syndrome having the highest occurrence (44.4%). Frequency of bleeding was predicted by a pre-operative World Health Organization bleeding score of 2 or higher. Some types of surgery were associated with a higher bleeding incidence, like cardiovascular and urological surgery. The use of pre-operative pro-hemostatic treatments was associated with a lower bleeding frequency in patients with inherited platelet function disorders but not in inherited platelet number disorders. Desmopressin, alone or with antifibrinolytic agents, was the preventive treatment associated with the lowest bleedings. Platelet transfusions were used more frequently in patients at higher bleeding risk. Surgical bleeding risk in inherited platelet disorders is substantial, especially in inherited platelet function disorders, and bleeding history, type of disorder, type of surgery and female sex are associated with higher bleeding frequency. Prophylactic pre-operative pro-hemostatic treatments appear to be required and are associated with a lower bleeding incidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2016.160754DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5566025PMC
July 2017

Effect of substituted stilbenes on platelet function.

Fitoterapia 2015 Sep 18;105:228-33. Epub 2015 Jul 18.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Section of Public Health, University of Perugia, via del, Liceo, 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy.

Stilbenes, including resveratrol, are polyphenols provided with protective actions on the cardiovascular system. Some natural derivatives of resveratrol, like pterostilbene, have a better bioavailability than the parent compound. The aim of the present study was to prepare different substituted stilbenes (dimethylallyloxy-stilbene, dimethylallyloxy-pterostilbene) and compare them with resveratrol, p-hydroxy-stilbene and pterostilbene for their biologic activities on platelet aggregation, platelet radical oxygen species (ROS) production, and platelet nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. The results show that the increase of stilbene derivative lipophilicity enhances their biologic activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2015.07.009DOI Listing
September 2015

Prevalence of hemostatic alterations in patients with recurrent spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2016 Jan;54(1):97-103

Background: Subconjunctival hemorrage (SCH) is a frequent, mild bleeding manifestation and a common cause of consultation. Hemostatic alterations are possible causes of SCH but their role and prevalence is unknown. We assessed the prevalence of hemostatic abnormalities in patients with spontaneous, recurrent SCH to clarify the role of the hemostasis laboratory in this clinical setting.

Methods: A total of 105 SCH patients (21-78 years, 65 females) with no identifiable cause (hypertension-trauma-conjunctivitis) or concomitant treatments (NSAIDs- aspirin-oral anticoagulants-antiplatelet agents) and 53 age and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) (22-72 years, 29 females) were evaluated for skin bleeding time, PFA-100®, blood clotting screening, platelet count, light transmission aggregomery, VWF:Ag, VWF:RCo, RIPA, FVIII activity, FXIII antigen and activity and ISTH Bleeding Severity Score (BSS).

Results: Prevalence of hemostatic abnormalities was not higher in the SCH population than in HCs BSS was 0.83 (95% CI 0.62-1.06) in SCH and 0.66 (0.37-0.95) in HC (p=NS). Type I Von Willebrand disease was diagnosed in one SCH and none HC patients, a prevalence not significantly different (p=NS by χ2).

Conclusions: The prevalence of hemostatic alterations in patients with recurrent, spontaneous SCH is not different from the general population; hemostatic screening or second level tests are of no use in patients with recurrent SCH and no other bleedings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2015-0274DOI Listing
January 2016