Publications by authors named "Sara Ng"

3 Publications

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HOW Collaborative position paper on the management of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2021 Apr 12;61(2):195-204. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy is a common occurrence, affecting up to 10% of women by the time of birth. These recommendations aim to provide pragmatic guidance on the investigation, diagnosis and management of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy; including safety of neuraxial anaesthesia and precautions required for birth. Management of neonatal thrombocytopenia is also addressed. The authors are clinicians representing haematology, obstetric medicine, maternal-fetal medicine, and anaesthesia. Each author conducted a detailed literature review then worked collaboratively to produce a series of unanimous recommendations. The recommendation strength is limited by the lack of high-quality clinical trial data, and represents level C evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajo.13303DOI Listing
April 2021

Protocol for a scoping review of outcomes in clinical studies of interventions for venous thromboembolism in adults.

BMJ Open 2020 12 7;10(12):e040122. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

Department of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Introduction: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, potentially fatal yet treatable disease. Several advances in treatment of VTE have been made over the past decades, but definition and reporting of outcomes across those studies are inconsistent. Development of an international core outcome set for clinical studies of interventions for VTE addresses this lack of standardisation. The first step in the development of a core outcome set is to conduct a scoping review which aims to generate an inclusive list of unique outcomes that have been reported in previous studies.

Methods And Analysis: MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials will be searched with no language restriction for prospective studies reporting on interventions for treatment of VTE in patients who are adult and non-pregnant. Records will be sorted in reverse chronological order. Study screening and data extraction will be independently performed by two authors in blocks based on date of publication, starting with 2015 to 2020 and subsequent 1-year periods, until no new outcome measures are identified from the set of included studies. After homogenising spelling and combining outcomes with the same meaning, a list of unique outcomes will be determined. Those outcomes will be grouped into outcome domains. Qualitative analysis and descriptive statistics will be used to report results.

Ethics And Dissemination: Ethical approval is not required for this study. The results of this scoping review will be presented at scientific conferences, published in a peer-reviewed journal, and they will provide candidate outcome domains to be considered in subsequent steps in the development of a core outcome set for clinical studies of interventions for VTE. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION DETAILS: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/40459.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7722803PMC
December 2020

A multicentre assessment of contemporary laboratory assays for heparin induced thrombocytopenia.

Pathology 2021 Feb 5;53(2):247-256. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

NSW Health Pathology, NSW, Australia; Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia.

Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of heparin therapy. In some patients, HIT causes platelet activation and thrombosis (sometimes abbreviated HITT), which leads to adverse clinical sequalae ('pathological HIT'). The likelihood of HIT is initially assessed clinically, typically using a scoring system, of which the 4T score is that most utilised. Subsequent laboratory testing to confirm or exclude HIT facilitates exclusion or diagnosis and management. The current investigation comprises a multicentre (n=9) assessment of contemporary laboratory testing for HIT, as performed over the past 1-3 years in each site and comprising testing of over 1200 samples. The primary laboratory test used by study participants (n=8) comprised a chemiluminescence procedure (HIT-IgG) performed on an AcuStar instrument. Additional immunological testing performed by study sites included lateral flow (STiC, Stago), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Asserachrom (HPIA IgG), PaGIA (BioRad), plus functional assays, primarily serotonin release assay (SRA) or platelet aggregation methods. The chemiluminescence procedure yielded a highly sensitive screening method for identifying functional HIT, given high area under the curve (AUC, generally ≥0.9) in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis against SRA as gold standard. ELISA testing resulted in lower ROC AUC scores (<0.8) and higher levels of false positives. Although there is clear association with the likelihood of HIT, the 4T score had less utility than literature suggests, and was comparable to a previous study reported by some of the authors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2020.07.012DOI Listing
February 2021