Publications by authors named "Sara L Horton-Deutsch"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The nurse's lived experience of becoming an interprofessional leader.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2014 Nov 23;45(11):487-93; quiz 494-5. Epub 2014 Oct 23.

In the current complex health care environment, nurses in all practice settings are called on to be leaders in advocating for a healthier future. Health care reform, the rise of the evidence-based practice movement, and the proliferation of new educational options are opening opportunities as never before for nurses to expand their leadership capacity to an interprofessional level. This interpretive phenomenological study conducted with eight nurse participants describes their experience of becoming an interprofessional leader. A team of three nurse researchers interpreted the texts individually and collectively. Interview texts were analyzed hermeneutically to uncover the common shared experience of moving toward common ground with interprofessional leadership as a process, one that not only took time, but also called for self-reflection, deliberate actions, and a new mind-set. This study develops the evidence base for leadership preparation at a time when there is a strong need for interprofessional leaders and educators in health care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20141023-03DOI Listing
November 2014

Mindfulness: overcoming intractable conflict.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2003 Aug;17(4):186-93

Indiana University School of Nursing, Department of Environments for Health and Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolia, Indiana, USA.

Intractable conflict involves reoccurring patterns of ineffective communication in which issues are not resolved and build over time. These situations can lead to bad feelings, damaged relationships, depression, aggression, anxiety and substance abuse. Grounded theory methods were used to study the processes involved in intractable conflicts and to identify ways of responding that promote growth and/or resolution. Results indicate that developing mindfulness over mindlessness is the basic social process that threads through three phases of working through intractable conflict. Phases include: growing awareness, self-realization, and regaining equilibrium. Mental health professionals can use this knowledge to support mindful practices as a means to protect against destructive conflict and mental health woes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0883-9417(03)00089-xDOI Listing
August 2003

Christman's principles for effective management: reflection and challenges for action.

J Nurs Adm 2002 Nov;32(11):596-601

Indiana University School of Nursing, Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Dr. Luther Christman developed a set of principles essential to effective nursing management in 1982. The authors cut through the change and chaos of the past 20 years to focus on these meaningful principles and encourage readers to reflect and enact these principles in their practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00005110-200211000-00007DOI Listing
November 2002

The PLUS intervention: a pilot test with caregivers of depressed older adults.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2002 Apr;16(2):61-71

Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

The PLUS Nursing Intervention, which is aimed at caregivers of elderly persons with depression and designed to increase caregiver personal resources, respond to caregiver learning/skill development needs, address caregiver unanticipated needs, and assist with caregiver stress/illness management, was pilot tested for efficacy. Thirteen families were assigned to the PLUS group and 12 families to the standard home care control group. There were no significant outcome differences between the two groups. However, caregivers who received the PLUS intervention made significantly more improvements over Standard Home Care caregivers when patients made functional improvements. Findings suggest that patient functioning might be a better predictor of long-term caregiver outcomes than psychiatric symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/apnu.2002.32108DOI Listing
April 2002