Publications by authors named "Sara Haseli"

37 Publications

ai-corona: Radiologist-assistant deep learning framework for COVID-19 diagnosis in chest CT scans.

PLoS One 2021 7;16(5):e0250952. Epub 2021 May 7.

Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.

The development of medical assisting tools based on artificial intelligence advances is essential in the global fight against COVID-19 outbreak and the future of medical systems. In this study, we introduce ai-corona, a radiologist-assistant deep learning framework for COVID-19 infection diagnosis using chest CT scans. Our framework incorporates an EfficientNetB3-based feature extractor. We employed three datasets; the CC-CCII set, the MasihDaneshvari Hospital (MDH) cohort, and the MosMedData cohort. Overall, these datasets constitute 7184 scans from 5693 subjects and include the COVID-19, non-COVID abnormal (NCA), common pneumonia (CP), non-pneumonia, and Normal classes. We evaluate ai-corona on test sets from the CC-CCII set, MDH cohort, and the entirety of the MosMedData cohort, for which it gained AUC scores of 0.997, 0.989, and 0.954, respectively. Our results indicates ai-corona outperforms all the alternative models. Lastly, our framework's diagnosis capabilities were evaluated as assistant to several experts. Accordingly, We observed an increase in both speed and accuracy of expert diagnosis when incorporating ai-corona's assistance.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250952PLOS
May 2021

Radiological and Laboratory Findings of Patients with COVID-19 Infection at the Time of Admission.

Iran J Pathol 2021 21;16(2):137-143. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Medical Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background & Objective: Diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can be challenging, especially when the real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is not available or it is negative. In this study, we evaluated imaging and laboratory findings in a group of patients with a multidisciplinary diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia.

Methods: A total of 163 patients with a clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to a specialised respiratory centre in Tehran, Iran were enrolled in this study. The distribution and characteristics of presenting radiological and laboratory findings were evaluated and the relationship to the outcome was investigated.

Results: RT-PCR was positive in 92 patients. The diagnosis of COVID-19 in RT-PCR negative patients was made on clinical and radiological features (n=71) and 24 (14.7%) patients died of disease. The common computed tomography (CT) scan findings included ground-glass (94%) and consolidating opacification (12%), mainly in the lower lobes (90%). Peripheral and central lung changes were observed in 90% and 52% of patients, respectively. Lymphopenia, positive CRP, and raised LDH were present in 32%, 65%, and 96% of cases, respectively. A raised LDH of >500U/L was the best predictor of death in these patients (R=0.6623; OR=24.4). Other markers of outcome included male gender, age (>50 years), lymphopenia, and severe CXR changes.

Conclusion: Diagnosis of COVID-19 can be challenging, and a multidisciplinary approach is often needed. Whilst RT-PCR is still the standard diagnostic test, a negative test should be interpreted with caution. Blood tests and imaging can be useful in the diagnosis, monitoring, and risk assessment in patients with COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30699/IJP.2020.128909.2415DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8085293PMC
October 2020

Fulminant mucormycosis complicating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 2021 Mar 13. Epub 2021 Mar 13.

Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/alr.22785DOI Listing
March 2021

Pelvic Pain and Adnexal Mass: Be Aware of Accessory and Cavitated Uterine Mass.

Case Rep Med 2021 11;2021:6649663. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Accessory and cavitated uterine mass (ACUM) is a rare form of Mullerian anomaly that usually presents in young females with chronic cyclic pelvic pain and/or dysmenorrhea. This clinical entity is often underdiagnosed as it may be mistaken for other differential diagnoses, such as pedunculated myoma or adnexal lesions. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), accompanied with relevant and suspicious clinical findings are important tools in making acorrect diagnosis. To date, surgical excision of the mass remains the mainstay of treatment,which provides significant symptom relief. In this study, we present a female adolescent with chronic pelvic pain since menarche who underwent laparotomy with the presumed diagnosis of a left-sided ovarian mass. Retrospective evaluation of pelvic MR images demonstrated that the lesion was in fact an ACUM, which was further confirmed by histopathological examination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6649663DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7892247PMC
February 2021

No clinical benefit of high dose corticosteroid administration in patients with COVID-19: A preliminary report of a randomized clinical trial.

Eur J Pharmacol 2021 Apr 16;897:173947. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of dexamethasone administration in patients with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The study included 50 patients who were randomly assigned to the dexamethasone group or control group. Dexamethasone was administered at a dose of 20 mg/day from day 1-5 and then at 10 mg/day from day 6-10. The need for invasive mechanical ventilation, death rate, duration of clinical improvement, length of hospital stay, and radiological changes in the computed tomography scan were assessed. The results revealed that 92% and 96% of patients in the dexamethasone and control groups, respectively, required noninvasive ventilation (P = 0.500). Among them, 52% and 44% of patients in the dexamethasone and control groups, respectively, required invasive mechanical ventilation (P = 0.389). At the end of the study, 64% of patients in the dexamethasone group and 60% of patients in the control group died (P = 0.500); the remaining patients were discharged from the hospital during the 28-day follow-up period. The median length of hospital stay was 11 days in the dexamethasone group and 6 days in the control group (P = 0.036) and the median length of hospital stay was 7 days in the dexamethasone group and 3 days in the control group (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the other outcomes. This study showed that corticosteroid administration had no clinical benefit in patients with COVID-19-induced mild to moderate ARDS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2021.173947DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7885705PMC
April 2021

Multimodality Imaging With PET/CT and MRI Reveals Hypometabolism in Tertiary Olfactory Cortex in Parosmia of COVID-19.

Acad Radiol 2021 05 3;28(5):749-751. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Neyavran, Darabad, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2021.01.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7857079PMC
May 2021

Musculoskeletal imaging manifestations of beta-thalassemia.

Skeletal Radiol 2021 Feb 9. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, UW Radiology-Roosevelt Clinic, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Box 354755, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA.

Beta-thalassemia is a heterogeneous group of anemic disorders caused by the absence or defective production of beta-globin chains. Their clinical manifestations vary from asymptomatic to severe symptoms leading to a transfusion-dependent anemic state. The genes that cause thalassemia are prevalent in Asian and African populations, particularly concentrated in the Middle East, Mediterranean region, parts of India, and South East Asia. Over time, the disease causes various musculoskeletal abnormalities with complex pathophysiology secondary to chronic anemia. The compensatory mechanisms result in diffuse marrow hyperplasia, yellow to red marrow reconversion, osteopenia, and pathologic fractures. Inability to remove excess iron and inevitable iron overload as a result of multiple blood transfusions in patients with thalassemia major and intermedia is another face of the disease. Musculoskeletal manifestations include osteopenia, coarse trabeculae, bone expansion, synovitis, joint effusion, and metaphyseal dysplasia. These complications have long-lasting effects on the skeletal growth pattern resulting in bone deformity, short stature, premature closure of physes, and predisposition to infection. Additionally, there are radiologic features of iron-chelator therapy, which are unique and unrelated to the disease process itself. Familiarity of radiologists with the imaging features of beta-thalassemia is crucial in both diagnosis and timely management of the disease and its complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-021-03732-9DOI Listing
February 2021

Pulmonary embolism and COVID-19 pneumonia: the role of non-enhanced chest computed tomography.

Rev Cardiovasc Med 2020 12;21(4):493-495

School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 14155-6559, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31083/j.rcm.2020.04.246DOI Listing
December 2020

Radiological Mimickers of COVID-19 Pneumonia: A Pictorial Review.

Tanaffos 2020 Nov;19(2):100-107

Medical Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Computed tomography (CT) scan plays an important role in the early diagnosis of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia. In resource-limited regions with limited availability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kits, CT findings, together with appropriate clinical parameters, are used to establish an accurate diagnosis. However, since the radiological findings are non-specific, the CT features may overlap with the findings of several other categories of pulmonary diseases. Diagnosis based on radiological features can be especially challenging in the presence of a comorbid lung disease. This study aimed to describe the radiological findings of a wide spectrum of lung pathologies, with emphasis on their similarities with the common presentations of COVID-19 pneumonia.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7680513PMC
November 2020

Evaluating the effects of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg) on the management of severe COVID-19 cases: A randomized controlled trial.

Int Immunopharmacol 2021 Jan 13;90:107205. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center (CRDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: The newly discovered coronavirus has turned into coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and it rages at an unprecedented rate. Considering the findings of previous studies on the use of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg) for treating severe HN infection and the satisfying results for reducing viral load and mortality, this study aimed to investigate the potential usefulness of IVIg for the management of severe cases.

Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 84 patients were included: 52 in the IVIg group and 32 in the control group. The intervention group received IVIg at a dose of 400 mg/kg, IV, daily for three days. Both groups received hydroxychloroquine, lopinavir/ritonavir and supportive care. The demographic data, mortality rate, the need for mechanical ventilation, length of stay in hospital and in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and imaging findings were recorded and compared in terms of the mentioned factors.

Results: The mean time from admission to IVIg initiation was 3.84 ± 3.35 days. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of mortality rate (P-value = 0.8) and the need for mechanical ventilation (P-value = 0.39). The length of hospital stay was significantly lower for the control group than that of the intervention group (P-value = 0.003). There was a significant positive relationship between the time from hospital admission to IVIg initiation and the length of stay in the hospital and ICU among the survivors (P-value < 0.001 and =0.01, respectively).

Conclusions: Our findings did not support the use of IVIg in combination with hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir in treatment of severe COVID-19 cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2020.107205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7665876PMC
January 2021

FDG-PET/CT Assessment of COVID-19-Induced Bell's Palsy.

Acad Radiol 2021 01 6;28(1):144-145. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7834804PMC
January 2021

Transient FDG-avid hilar lymph node on PET/CT imaging in asymptomatic COVID-19.

IDCases 2020 6;22:e00981. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The most common features of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia on chest computed tomography imaging are ground glass opacity and consolidation. Mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement are less frequently observed. Herein, we present an unexpected finding of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid hilar lymph node in an asymptomatic patient with COVID-19, and show that this is a transient phenomenon, subsiding on a follow-up FDG-PET/CT within 10 days.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.idcr.2020.e00981DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7644432PMC
November 2020

Portal vein thrombosis associated with COVID-19: points to consider.

BJR Case Rep 2020 Sep 24;6(3):20200089. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Medical Imaging Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

The rapid global spread as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COVID-19 has raised increasing concern around the globe. Studies have reported that patients infected with the novel coronavirus are prone to coagulopathy. However, information on portal vein thrombosis in patients with COVID-19 is scarce. In this case report, we depict the abdominal CT findings of a 26-year-old male patient with COVID-19 who developed severe abdominal pain during hospitalization and was later diagnosed with portal vein thrombosis. We also demonstrate the chest CT findings of the same patient, which revealed bilateral pleural effusion, a less common imaging finding, and multifocal patchy consolidations. This paper emphasizes that physicians, particularly radiologists, should be aware of thromboembolic events when examining any suspected patient during the current outbreak.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjrcr.20200089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7465749PMC
September 2020

Promising effects of tocilizumab in COVID-19: A non-controlled, prospective clinical trial.

Int Immunopharmacol 2020 Nov 4;88:106869. Epub 2020 Aug 4.

Clinical Tuberculosis and Epidemiology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: The clinical presentation of SARS-CoV-2 infection ranges from mild symptoms to severe complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this syndrome, inflammatory cytokines are released after activation of the inflammatory cascade, with the predominant role of interleukin (IL)-6. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tocilizumab, as an IL-6 antagonist, in patients with severe or critical SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 76 patients with severe or critical SARS-CoV-2 infection were evaluated for eligibility, and ultimately, 42 patients were included. Tocilizumab was administered at a dose of 400 mg as a single dose via intravenous infusion. Primary outcomes included changes in oxygenation support, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, and death. Secondary outcomes included radiological changes in the lungs, IL-6 plasma levels, C-reactive protein levels, and adverse drug reactions. The data were analyzed using SPSS software.

Results: Of the 42 included patients, 20 (48%) patients presented the severe infection stage and 22 (52%) were in the critical stage. The median age of patients was 56 years, and the median IL-6 level was 28.55 pg/mL. After tocilizumab administration, only 6 patients (14%) required invasive ventilation. Additionally, 35 patients (83.33%) showed clinical improvement. By day 28, a total of 7 patients died (6 patients in the critical stage and 1 patient in the severe stage). Neurological adverse effects were observed in 3 patients.

Conclusions: Based on the current results, tocilizumab may be a promising agent for patients with severe or critical SARS-CoV-2 infection, if promptly initiated during the severe stage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2020.106869DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7402206PMC
November 2020

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis might be under-diagnosed in the COVID-19 era.

eNeurologicalSci 2020 Sep 15;20:100256. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

Division of Stroke and Endovascular Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ensci.2020.100256DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7361048PMC
September 2020

Extramedullary haematopoiesis presenting as a periportal mass.

BMJ Case Rep 2020 Jul 22;13(7). Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Medical Imaging Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran

Extramedullary haematopoiesis (EMH) is defined as haematopoiesis occurring in organs outside the bone marrow. The liver is one of the rare sites of EMH, and to the best of our knowledge, a few cases of adult EMH of the liver have been reported in the last 20 years. Here, we reported the case of a 68-year-old man with a known history of myelofibrosis presented with vague abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a hypoattenuating periportal mass encasing the portal vein. The final diagnosis of EMH was made through the histopathological examination. This is a rare presentation of EMH, which may be easily mistaken for other pathologies such as metastases. Familiarity with this type of presentation aids in correctly diagnosing it in an appropriate clinical setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-235064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7380837PMC
July 2020

Paranasal sinuses computed tomography findings in anosmia of COVID-19.

Am J Otolaryngol 2020 Nov - Dec;41(6):102636. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: Olfactory dysfunction in coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is poorly understood. Thus, mechanistic data are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological drivers of anosmia of COVID-19.

Methods: We performed the current study in patients who presented with anosmia and COVID-19 as documented by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay between April 1st and May 15st, 2020. We assessed for the conductive causes of anosmia with computed tomography (CT) of paranasal sinuses.

Results: 49 patients who presented with anosmia and positive PCR assay for COVID-19 were included. The average age was 45 ± 12.2 years. Complete anosmia was present in 85.7% of patients and 91.8% of patients reported sudden onset of olfactory dysfunction. Taste disturbance was common (75.5%). There were no significant pathological changes in the paranasal sinuses on CT scans. Olfactory cleft and ethmoid sinuses appeared normal while in other sinuses, partial opacification was detected only in some cases.

Conclusion: We did not find significant mucosal changes or olfactory cleft abnormality on CT imaging in patients with anosmia of COVID-19. Conductive causes of anosmia (i.e., mucosal disease) do not seem play a significant role in anosmia of COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2020.102636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7831990PMC
November 2020

Reply to "MRI Evaluation of the Olfactory Clefts in Patients with SARS-CoV-2 Infection Revealed an Unexpected Mechanism for Olfactory Function Loss".

Acad Radiol 2020 08 10;27(8):1192. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Neyavran, Daar Abad, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.05.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7284249PMC
August 2020

Missing Pituitary Stalk: A Key to the Diagnosis.

Iran J Med Sci 2020 May;45(3):224-225

Medical Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.30476/ijms.2020.82182.1005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7253495PMC
May 2020

Lung Ultrasound in COVID-19 Pneumonia: Prospects and Limitations.

Acad Radiol 2020 07 3;27(7):1044-1045. Epub 2020 May 3.

Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196391PMC
July 2020

Lobar Distribution of COVID-19 Pneumonia Based on Chest Computed Tomography Findings; A Retrospective Study.

Arch Acad Emerg Med 2020 18;8(1):e55. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Department of Radiology, Shohada-E-Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) imaging has quickly found its place as a beneficial tool in the detection of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To date, only a few studies have reported the distribution of lung lesions by segment. This study aimed to evaluate the lobar and segmental distribution of COVID-19 pneumonia based on patients' chest CT scan.

Methods: This was a retrospective study performed on 63 Iranian adult patients with a final diagnosis of COVID-19. All patients had undergone chest CT scan on admission. Demographic data and imaging profile, including segmental distribution, were evaluated. Moreover, a scoring scale was designed to assess the severity of ground-glass opacification (GGO). The relationship of GGO score with age, sex, and symptoms at presentation was investigated.

Results: Among included patients, mean age of patients was 54.2 ±14.9 (range: 26 - 81) years old and 60.3% were male. Overall, the right lower lobe (87.3%) and the left lower lobe (85.7%) were more frequently involved. Specifically, predominant involvement was seen in the posterior segment of the left lower lobe (82.5%). The most common findings were peripheral GGO and consolidation, which were observed in 92.1% and 42.9% of patients, respectively. According to the self-designed GGO scoring scale, about half of the patients presented with mild GGO on admission. GGO score was found to be equally distributed among different sex and age categories; however, the presence of dyspnea on admission was significantly associated with a higher GGO score (p= 0.022). Cavitation, reticulation, calcification, bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud appearance and nodules were not identified in any of the cases.

Conclusion: COVID-19 mainly affects the lower lobes of the lungs. GGO and consolidation in the lung periphery is the imaging hallmark in patients with COVID-19 infection. Absence of bronchiectasis, solitary nodules, cavitation, calcifications, tree-in-bud appearance, and reversed halo-sign indicates that these features are not common findings, at least in the earlier stages.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7212068PMC
April 2020

Oral Radiology Center as a Potential Source of COVID-19 Transmission; Points to Consider.

Acad Radiol 2020 07 8;27(7):1047-1048. Epub 2020 May 8.

Medical Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7205637PMC
July 2020

Neurologic Involvement in COVID-19: Radiologists' Perspective.

Acad Radiol 2020 07 5;27(7):1051-1053. Epub 2020 May 5.

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical sciences, Shohada Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200135PMC
July 2020

FDG PET/CT Scan Reveals Hypoactive Orbitofrontal Cortex in Anosmia of COVID-19.

Acad Radiol 2020 07 3;27(7):1042-1043. Epub 2020 May 3.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196385PMC
July 2020

Diagnosing Pulmonary Thromboembolism in COVID-19: A Stepwise Clinical and Imaging Approach.

Acad Radiol 2020 06 17;27(6):896-897. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164893PMC
June 2020

COVID-19 or Pulmonary Contusion? A Diagnostic Dilemma.

Acad Radiol 2020 06 15;27(6):894-895. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7158835PMC
June 2020

Olfactory Bulb Magnetic Resonance Imaging in SARS-CoV-2-Induced Anosmia: The First Report.

Acad Radiol 2020 06 11;27(6):892-893. Epub 2020 Apr 11.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7151240PMC
June 2020

Methanol Poisoning Emerging as the Result of COVID-19 Outbreak; Radiologic Perspective.

Acad Radiol 2020 05 6;27(5):755-756. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD), Tehran, Iran; Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2020.03.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7136884PMC
May 2020