Publications by authors named "Sara Ataei"

11 Publications

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Clinical and phytochemical studies of Plantago major in pressure ulcer treatment: A randomized controlled trial.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2021 Jan 27;43:101325. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Medicinal Plants and Natural Products Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Plantago major L. is used by local people to improve various wounds and lesions such as pressure ulcer. In this study, the therapeutic effects of P. major topical formulation on the stage 1 pressure ulcer in patients have been investigated.

Materials And Methods: This randomized triple blind clinical trial study was performed on 130 patients. During the 14 days of study, each of the test and control groups was checked according to check list. Also the topical formulation was standardized by HPLC based on the amount of quercetin.

Results: The findings of this study indicated a significant difference in resolution of the damage between the test and control groups. Topical formulation was standardized by HPLC based on the quercetin (1.88 mg/100g) and no side effects associated with this topical formulation was found.

Conclusion: The results confirmed the traditional use of P. major in resolution of the damage. CLINICAL TRIAL ID: (IRCT201609209014N117).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2021.101325DOI Listing
January 2021

Pentoxifylline Attenuates Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Cardiac Oxidative Damage in Mice.

Oxid Med Cell Longev 2021 7;2021:6406318. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Medicinal Plants and Natural Products Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic potential effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) against arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced cardiac oxidative damage in mice. Thirty-six male albino mice were divided into six groups and treated intraperitoneally with normal saline (group 1), ATO (5 mg/kg; group 2), PTX (100 mg/kg; group 3), and different doses of PTX (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg; groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively) with ATO. After four weeks, the blood sample was collected for biochemical experiments. In addition, cardiac tissue was removed for assessment of oxidative stress markers and histopathological changes (such as hemorrhage, necrosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and myocardial degeneration). The findings showed that ATO caused a significant raise in serum biochemical markers such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and troponin-I (cTnI), glucose, total cholesterol (TC), and triglyceride (TG) levels. In addition to histopathological changes in cardiac tissue, ATO led to the significant increase in cardiac lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO); remarkable decrease in the activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx); and the depletion of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total thiol groups (TTGs). PTX was able to reduce the increased levels of serum cardiac markers (LDH, CPK, cTnI, TC, and TG), cardiac LPO, and improve antioxidant markers (TAC, TTGs, CAT, SOD, and GPx) alongside histopathologic changes. However, no significant changes were observed in elevated serum glucose and cardiac NO levels. In conclusion, the current study showed the potential therapeutic effect of PTX in the prevention of ATO-induced cardiotoxicity via reversing the oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6406318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7810555PMC
January 2021

Therapeutic Potential of Dihydropyridine Calcium Channel Blockers on Oxidative Injury Caused by Organophosphates in Cortex and Cerebellum: An In Vivo Study.

Indian J Clin Biochem 2020 Jul 14;35(3):339-346. Epub 2019 May 14.

Medicinal Plants and Natural Products Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

This study was designed to investigate the effects of amlodipine (AM), a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, on the oxidative damage induced by diazinon (DZN) in the rat cortex and cerebellum. Forty-two rats were randomly divided into six groups. The rats were treated intraperitoneally with normal saline (group 1), AM (9 mg/kg; group 2), DZN (32 mg/kg; group 3) and different doses of AM (3, 6, and 9 mg/kg; groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively) with DZN. After 14 days, the cerebellum and cortex tissues were removed for biochemical and histological experiments. DZN significantly decreased acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE; 57%,  < 0.001 and 39.1%,  < 0.05), depleted total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 46.2%,  < 0.01 and 44.7%,  < 0.05), and increased lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH; 96%,  < 0.001 and 202%,  < 0.001), nitric oxide (NO; 130%,  < 0.001 and 74.4%,  < 0.001), and lipid peroxidation levels (LPO; 35.6%,  < 0.001 and 128.7%,  < 0.001), in the cerebellum and cortex tissues, respectively. In addition, DZN induced structural alterations in the cerebellum and cortex. Following AM administration, a remarkable improvement was observed in LDH activity and some of the oxidative markers, such as NO and LPO; however, no significant changes were found in AChE activity when the DZN group was compared with the AM-treated groups. This study suggests that AM may prevent DZN-induced neurotoxicity via improvement of the oxidative/antioxidant balance in the cerebellum and cortex tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12291-019-00830-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7326842PMC
July 2020

Evaluation of drug interventions for the treatment of sleep disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

Korean J Pediatr 2019 Nov 2;62(11):405-409. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

A structured review study of drug interventions on sleep disorders in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has not been published to date. This systematic review aimed to investigate drug interventions for the treatment of sleep disorders in children with ASD. The Web of Science, PubMed, and Scopus databases were searched until March 2019. Study quality was assessed using the Delphi checklist. Due to the heterogeneity of the findings, a meta-analysis was not possible. Drug interventions for the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with ASD included melatonin, atomoxetine, and risperidone. Atomoxetine had no effect on sleep disorders in patients with ASD. A total of 10 studies were reviewed. Melatonin appears to be useful for the treatment of sleep problems in patients with ASD, but further studies are needed to determine the effects of other drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2019.00668DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6881205PMC
November 2019

Comparison of Sertraline with Rifampin in the treatment of Cholestatic Pruritus: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Rev Recent Clin Trials 2019 ;14(3):217-223

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Background: Pruritus is one of the most common and disabling symptoms of liver disease such as Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Primary Biliary Cholangitis. Cholestyramine, rifampin, opioid antagonists, antihistaminic agents and SSRIs are used for the management of pruritus. Due to rifampin drug interactions as well as its serious side effects such as hepatotoxicity, clinicians are endeavoruing to find a safer and a more effective substitution.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of sertraline with rifampin in the management of cholestatic pruritus.

Methods: In a single-blinded randomized clinical trial a total of 36 patients of PSC and PBC were divided into two equal groups, one group received 100 mg/day sertraline and the other group received rifampin 300 mg/day for 4 weeks. Visual analog scale was used to record pruritus severity at baseline and 4 weeks after drug intervention, also, ALT, AST, ALP and total bilirubin of all patients were measured at three different time points.

Results: Over the follow-up period, pruritus had relieved in both groups, but there was no significant differences between sertraline and rifampin in pruritus management (pvalue=0.740), also there was no significant difference between the two intervention strategies (A versus B) in total bilirubin level (pvalue=0.106). Moreover, the ALT, AST and ALP levels were found to be significantly different between the two groups (Pvalue˂0.01).

Conclusion: There is no difference between sertraline and rifampin in pruritus improvement, but sertraline has less adverse effects on hepatobiliary enzyme levels, so it seems to be safer than rifampin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1574887114666190328130720DOI Listing
May 2020

A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Effects of Oral N-Acetyl Cysteine on Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Curr Rheumatol Rev 2019 ;15(3):246-253

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Background: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a common inflammatory disease of the joints. Due to the importance of inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of RA, drugs that have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, such as N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC), can be used as adjunctive therapy in patients with RA.

Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral NAC on inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in patients with RA.

Methods: Adjunct to standard treatment, the NAC group (23 patients) received 600 mg of NAC twice daily and the placebo group (19 patients) received identical placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Serum levels of Total Oxidant Status (TOS), Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC), nitric oxide (NO), Total Thiol Groups (TTG), Malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin- 6 (IL-6), C-reactive Protein (CRP), and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study.

Results: Results showed that in the NAC group, the serum levels of MDA, NO, IL-6, TNF-α, ESR and CRP were significantly lower than the baseline. Also, the serum level of TAC and TTG, as antioxidant parameters, increased significantly. However, only NO, MDA and TTG showed a significant difference in the NAC group as compared to the placebo group at the end of study.

Conclusion: According to the results of this study, oral NAC can significantly reduce the several oxidative stress factors and inflammatory cytokines. These results need to be confirmed in larger studies while considering clinical outcomes of RA patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573403X14666180926100811DOI Listing
January 2020

A comparative study on the effect of "black cohosh" and "evening primrose oil" on menopausal hot flashes.

J Educ Health Promot 2018 1;7:36. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

MSc. of Midwifery consulting, Department of Midwifery, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Introduction: Hot flashes are considered to be a common experience for menopausal women and they can compromise the quality of life. The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of in comparison with evening primrose oil (EPO) in postmenopausal women with menopause-related symptoms.

Materials And Methods: This study was performed on 80 postmenopausal women with hot flashes. The participants were randomly divided into two groups by blocked randomization. The participants of one group received black cohosh and the other group received EPO for 8 weeks. The severity and number of hot flashes and quality of life were measured by four-point scale, and the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) questionnaire at pre-intervention, 1, 4, and 8 weeks after treatment. Data were analyzed in SPSS Version 16 using independent -test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact test.

Results: Average severity of hot flashes in both groups and number of hot flashes in black cohosh group in 8 week were significantly lower than 1 week ( < 0.001), but number of hot flashes in primrose oil group in 8 week showed no significant differences ( = 0.32). The number of hot flashes and quality of life score in black cohosh arm compared to EPO showed a significant decrease in the 8 week ( < 0.05). All MENQOL scores were significantly improved in two groups ( < 0.05), but the percentage of improvement in black cohosh arm was significantly superior to EPO group.

Conclusion: Both herbs were effective in reduction of severity of hot flashes and improvement of the quality of life, but it seems that black cohosh is more effective than primrose oil because it was able to reduce the number of hot flashes too.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jehp.jehp_81_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868221PMC
March 2018

Evaluating the Effect of Oral N-acetylcysteine as an Adjuvant Treatment on Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized, Double Blind Clinical Trial.

Rev Recent Clin Trials 2018 ;13(2):132-138

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Objective: Oxidative stress and Overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines are contributed in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent which demonstrated analgesic effects in some studies. This study is designed to assess the effects of oral NAC as an adjuvant therapy on the clinical outcomes of patients with active RA.

Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 51 RA patients with active RA were studied in 2 groups: NAC group (27 patients) received standard treatment of RA and 600 mg NAC twice a day for 12 weeks, and placebo group (24 patients) received the standard treatment of RA and placebo. Disease activity score (DAS28) was used to assess the activity of RA, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for the severity of pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) for the patients' physical performance, and Global Health (GH) parameter for the patients' assessment of their disease activity. The number of tender and swollen joints and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) were also determined for each patient. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 (Chicago, IL, USA).

Results: After 12 weeks of intervention, there were no significant differences between two groups in DAS28 score and ESR (P values were 0.4 and 0.6, respectively). However, GH, VAS, and HAQ scores were improved significantly in the NAC group compared to the placebo group.

Conclusion: Our findings indicate that oral administration of NAC may be associated with improving health status in RA patients and considered as an adjuvant therapy in these patients. Further studies with larger sample size, longer study duration and higher doses of NAC are needed to confirm the effects of oral NAC in RA patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1574887113666180307151937DOI Listing
December 2018

Comparison the Effect of Fish-Oil and Calcium Supplementation on Treatment of Primary Dysmenorrhea.

Rev Recent Clin Trials 2017 ;12(3):148-153

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan. Iran.

Background: Primary dysmenorrhea is common among young girls and childbearing women. Dysmenorrhea is a painful contraction of uterus which occurs in the beginning of bleeding or before the menstrual cycle begins. Regarding the mechanism of calcium in response to hormonal change and the role of fish oil on reducing prostaglandins, we compared the effectiveness of fish-oil and calcium supplementation in treating primary dysmenorrheal.

Methods: This randomized double-blinded clinical trial was conducted on women aged 18 to 45 years with moderate to severe primary dysmenorrhea symptoms from January 2015 to March 2015. The women were randomly divided to two groups (fish oil and calcium). The drugs were given every day in the first cycle and from 8 days before till 2 days after initiation of menstruation for the second and third cycles. The intensity of pain and other symptoms of dysmenorreha were recorded and data were analyzed in SPSS 16 using T-test and X2 tests. Significant level was considered to be less than 0.05.

Results: The mean ± SD age of the patients in the fish oil group was 25.0±4.3 and in calcium group was 25.48±6.6 years. According to this result, there was no statistically significant difference in the intensity of pain between fish-oil group and calcium group before and 1 month after the study (P>0.05). However, there was statistically significant difference between fish-oil group and calcium group before the study and 2 months (P=0.001) and 3 months after study (p<0.001). Besides, the fishoil patients needed less analgesic as compared to the calcium patients.

Conclusion: It is concluded that omega-3 is more effective than calcium, what can be justified by pain mechanisms and symptoms pathology in dysmenorrheal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1574887112666170328125529DOI Listing
August 2018

Urine neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin as an early marker of acute kidney injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

Ren Fail 2015 Jul 6;37(6):994-8. Epub 2015 May 6.

a Research Center for Rational Use of Drugs, Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran .

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients with an incidence of 21-73%. Prevention and early diagnosis reduces the frequency and severity of this complication. Predictive biomarkers are of major importance to timely diagnosis. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a widely investigated novel biomarker for early diagnosis of AKI. However, no study assessed NGAL for AKI diagnosis in HSCT patients. We performed further analyses on gathered data from our recent trial to evaluate the performance of urine NGAL (uNGAL) as an indicator of AKI in 72 allogeneic HSCT patients. AKI diagnosis and severity were assessed using Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-End-stage renal disease and AKI Network criteria. We assessed uNGAL on days -6, -3, +3, +9 and +15. Time-dependent Cox regression analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between uNGAL and AKI occurrence. (HR = 1.04 (1.008-1.07), p = 0.01). There was a relation between uNGAL day + 9 to baseline ratio and incidence of AKI (unadjusted HR = 1.047 (1.012-1.083), p < 0.01). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for day + 9 to baseline ratio was 0.86 (0.74-0.99, p < 0.01) and a cut-off value of 2.62 was 85% sensitive and 83% specific in predicting AKI. Our results indicated that increase in uNGAL augmented the risk of AKI and the changes of day +9 uNGAL concentrations from baseline could be of value for predicting AKI in HSCT patients. Additionally uNGAL changes preceded serum Cr raises by nearly 2 days.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0886022X.2015.1040699DOI Listing
July 2015

A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial on N-acetylcysteine for the prevention of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Hematol Oncol 2015 Jun 8;33(2):67-74. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is associated with increased mortality. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a thiol compound with antioxidant and vasodilatory properties that has been investigated for the prevention of AKI in several clinical settings. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of intravenous NAC on the prevention of AKI in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted, and 80 patients were recruited to receive 100 mg/kg/day NAC or placebo as intermittent intravenous infusion from day -6 to day +15. AKI was determined on the basis of the Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-End-stage renal disease and AKI Network criteria as the primary outcome. We assessed urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) on days -6, -3, +3, +9 and +15 as the secondary outcome. Moreover, transplant-related outcomes and NAC adverse reactions were evaluated during the study period. Statistical analysis was performed using appropriate parametric and non-parametric methods including Kaplan-Meier for AKI and generalized estimating equation for uNGAL. At the end of the trial, data from 72 patients were analysed (NAC: 33 patients and placebo: 39 patients). Participants of each group were not different considering baseline characteristics. AKI was observed in 18% of NAC recipients and 15% of placebo group patients, and the occurrence pattern was not significantly different (p = 0.73). Moreover, no significant difference was observed between groups for uNGAL measures (p = 0.10). Transplant-related outcomes were similar for both groups, and all patients had successful engraftment. Three patients did not tolerate NAC because of abdominal pain, shortness of breath and rash with pruritus and were dropped from the intervention group before transplantation. However, the frequency of adverse reactions was not significantly different between groups. In conclusion, our findings could not show any clinical benefits from high-dose NAC particularly for AKI prevention in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2141DOI Listing
June 2015