Publications by authors named "Sanne W ten Broeke"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in female heterozygotes of pathogenic mismatch repair variants: a Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database report.

Genet Med 2020 Dec 1. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Department of Department of Tumor Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Purpose: To determine impact of risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) on gynecological cancer incidence and death in heterozygotes of pathogenic MMR (path_MMR) variants.

Methods: The Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database was used to investigate the effects of gynecological risk-reducing surgery (RRS) at different ages.

Results: Risk-reducing hysterectomy at 25 years of age prevents endometrial cancer before 50 years in 15%, 18%, 13%, and 0% of path_MLH1, path_MSH2, path_MSH6, and path_PMS2 heterozygotes and death in 2%, 2%, 1%, and 0%, respectively. Risk-reducing BSO at 25 years of age prevents ovarian cancer before 50 years in 6%, 11%, 2%, and 0% and death in 1%, 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. Risk-reducing hysterectomy at 40 years prevents endometrial cancer by 50 years in 13%, 16%, 11%, and 0% and death in 1%, 2%, 1%, and 0%, respectively. BSO at 40 years prevents ovarian cancer before 50 years in 4%, 8%, 0%, and 0%, and death in 1%, 1%, 0%, and 0%, respectively.

Conclusion: Little benefit is gained by performing RRS before 40 years of age and premenopausal BSO in path_MSH6 and path_PMS2 heterozygotes has no measurable benefit for mortality. These findings may aid decision making for women with LS who are considering RRS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01029-1DOI Listing
December 2020

Correction: Cancer risks by gene, age, and gender in 6350 carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair variants: findings from the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database.

Genet Med 2020 Sep;22(9):1569

Department of Tumor Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-0892-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7462742PMC
September 2020

The "unnatural" history of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: Lessons from colonoscopy surveillance.

Int J Cancer 2021 Feb 3;148(4):800-811. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Department of Applied Tumour Biology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS), one of the most common inherited cancer syndromes, are at increased risk of developing malignancies, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). Regular colonoscopy with polypectomy is recommended to reduce CRC risk in LS individuals. However, recent independent studies demonstrated that a substantial proportion of LS individuals develop CRC despite regular colonoscopy. The reasons for this surprising observation confirmed by large prospective studies are a matter of debate. In this review, we collect existing evidence from clinical, epidemiological and molecular studies and interpret them with regard to the origins and progression of LS-associated CRC. Alongside with hypotheses addressing colonoscopy quality and pace of progression from adenoma to cancer, we discuss the role of alternative precursors and immune system in LS-associated CRC. We also identify gaps in current knowledge and make suggestions for future studies aiming at improved CRC prevention for LS individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33224DOI Listing
February 2021

Survival by colon cancer stage and screening interval in Lynch syndrome: a prospective Lynch syndrome database report.

Hered Cancer Clin Pract 2019 14;17:28. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

1Department of Tumor Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: We previously reported that in pathogenic mismatch repair () variant carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) was not reduced when colonoscopy was undertaken more frequently than once every 3 years, and that CRC stage and interval since last colonoscopy were not correlated.

Methods: The Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database (PLSD) that records outcomes of surveillance was examined to determine survival after colon cancer in relation to the time since previous colonoscopy and pathological stage. Only variants scored by the InSiGHT variant database as class 4 or 5 (clinically actionable) were included in the analysis.

Results: Ninety-nine carriers had no cancer prior to or at first colonoscopy, but subsequently developed colon cancer. Among these, 96 were 65 years of age or younger at diagnosis, and included 77 , 17 and 2 carriers. The number of cancers detected within < 1.5, 1.5-2.5, 2.5-3.5 and at > 3.5 years after previous colonoscopy were 9, 43, 31 and 13, respectively. Of these, 2, 8, 4 and 3 were stage III, respectively, and only one stage IV (interval 2.5-3.5 years) disease. Ten-year crude survival after colon cancer were 93, 94 and 82% for stage I, II and III disease, respectively ( < 0.001). Ten-year crude survival when the last colonoscopy had been < 1.5, 1.5-2.5, 2.5-3.5 or > 3.5 years before diagnosis, was 89, 90, 90 and 92%, respectively ( = 0.91).

Conclusions: In and carriers, more advanced colon cancer stage was associated with poorer survival, whereas time since previous colonoscopy was not. Although the numbers are limited, together with our previously reported findings, these results may be in conflict with the view that follow-up of variant carriers with colonoscopy intervals of less than 3 years provides significant benefit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13053-019-0127-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6792227PMC
October 2019

Declining detection rates for APC and biallelic MUTYH variants in polyposis patients, implications for DNA testing policy.

Eur J Hum Genet 2020 02 16;28(2):222-230. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of APC-associated familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) in a large cohort, taking into account factors as adenoma count and year of diagnosis. All application forms used to send patients in for APC and MUTYH variant analysis between 1992 and 2017 were collected (n = 2082). Using the data provided on the application form, the APC and biallelic MUTYH prevalence was determined and possible predictive factors were examined using multivariate multinomial logistic regression analysis in SPSS. The prevalence of disease causing variants in the APC gene significantly increases with adenoma count while MAP shows a peak prevalence in individuals with 50-99 adenomas. Logistic regression analysis shows significant odds ratios for adenoma count, age at diagnosis, and, interestingly, a decline in the chance of finding a variant in either gene over time. Moreover, in 22% (43/200) of patients with FAP-related extracolonic manifestations a variant was identified. The overall detection rates are above 10% for patients with >10 adenomas aged <60 and >20 adenomas aged <70. Patients with variants outside these criteria had FAP-related extracolonic manifestations, colorectal cancer aged <40, somatic KRAS c.34G > T variant in the tumor or a first-degree relative with >10 adenomas. Therefore, APC and MUTYH testing in patients with >10 adenomas aged <60 and with >20 adenomas aged <70 is advised. Almost all FAP and MAP patients not meeting these criteria showed other characteristics that can be used as an indication to prompt genetic testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0509-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6974599PMC
February 2020

Cancer risks by gene, age, and gender in 6350 carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair variants: findings from the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database.

Genet Med 2020 01 24;22(1):15-25. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

Department of Tumor Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Purpose: Pathogenic variants affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 cause Lynch syndrome and result in different but imprecisely known cancer risks. This study aimed to provide age and organ-specific cancer risks according to gene and gender and to determine survival after cancer.

Methods: We conducted an international, multicenter prospective observational study using independent test and validation cohorts of carriers of class 4 or class 5 variants. After validation the cohorts were merged providing 6350 participants and 51,646 follow-up years.

Results: There were 1808 prospectively observed cancers. Pathogenic MLH1 and MSH2 variants caused high penetrance dominant cancer syndromes sharing similar colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risks, but older MSH2 carriers had higher risk of cancers of the upper urinary tract, upper gastrointestinal tract, brain, and particularly prostate. Pathogenic MSH6 variants caused a sex-limited trait with high endometrial cancer risk but only modestly increased colorectal cancer risk in both genders. We did not demonstrate a significantly increased cancer risk in carriers of pathogenic PMS2 variants. Ten-year crude survival was over 80% following colon, endometrial, or ovarian cancer.

Conclusion: Management guidelines for Lynch syndrome may require revision in light of these different gene and gender-specific risks and the good prognosis for the most commonly associated cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0596-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7371626PMC
January 2020

An alternative approach to establishing unbiased colorectal cancer risk estimation in Lynch syndrome.

Genet Med 2019 12 17;21(12):2706-2712. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Biallelic pathogenic variants in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes cause a recessive childhood cancer predisposition syndrome known as constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD). Family members with a heterozygous MMR variant have Lynch syndrome. We aimed at estimating cancer risk in these heterozygous carriers as a novel approach to avoid complicated statistical methods to correct for ascertainment bias.

Methods: Cumulative colorectal cancer incidence was estimated in a cohort of PMS2- and MSH6-associated families, ascertained by the CMMRD phenotype of the index, by using mutation probabilities based on kinship coefficients as analytical weights in a proportional hazard regression on the cause-specific hazards. Confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained by bootstrapping at the family level.

Results: The estimated cumulative colorectal cancer risk at age 70 years for heterozygous PMS2 variant carriers was 8.7% (95% CI 4.3-12.7%) for both sexes combined, and 9.9% (95% CI 4.9-15.3%) for men and 5.9% (95% CI 1.6-11.1%) for women separately. For heterozygous MSH6 variant carriers these estimates are 11.8% (95% CI 4.5-22.7%) for both sexes combined, 10.0% (95% CI 1.83-24.5%) for men and 11.7% (95% CI 2.10-26.5%) for women.

Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with previous reports that used more complex statistical methods to correct for ascertainment bias. These results underline the need for MMR gene-specific surveillance protocols for Lynch syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0577-zDOI Listing
December 2019

The Apparent Genetic Anticipation in PMS2-Associated Lynch Syndrome Families Is Explained by Birth-cohort Effect.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2019 06 1;28(6):1010-1014. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background: PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome is characterized by a relatively low colorectal cancer penetrance compared with other Lynch syndromes. However, age at colorectal cancer diagnosis varies widely, and a strong genetic anticipation effect has been suggested for PMS2 families. In this study, we examined proposed genetic anticipation in a sample of 152 European PMS2 families.

Methods: The 152 families (637 family members) that were eligible for analysis were mainly clinically ascertained via clinical genetics centers. We used weighted Cox-type random effects model, adjusted by birth cohort and sex, to estimate the generational effect on the age of onset of colorectal cancer. Probands and young birth cohorts were excluded from the analyses. Weights represented mutation probabilities based on kinship coefficients, thus avoiding testing bias.

Results: Family data across three generations, including 123 colorectal cancers, were analyzed. When compared with the first generation, the crude HR for anticipation was 2.242 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.162-4.328] for the second generation and 2.644 (95% CI, 1.082-6.464) for the third generation. However, after correction for birth cohort and sex, the effect vanished [HR = 1.302 (95% CI, 0.648-2.619) and HR = 1.074 (95% CI, 0.406-2.842) for second and third generations, respectively].

Conclusions: Our study did not confirm previous reports of genetic anticipation in PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome. Birth-cohort effect seems the most likely explanation for observed younger colorectal cancer diagnosis in subsequent generations, particularly because there is currently no commonly accepted biological mechanism that could explain genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome.

Impact: This new model for studying genetic anticipation provides a standard for rigorous analysis of families with dominantly inherited cancer predisposition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0576DOI Listing
June 2019

Mutational Signature Analysis Reveals NTHL1 Deficiency to Cause a Multi-tumor Phenotype.

Cancer Cell 2019 02;35(2):256-266.e5

Department of Human Genetics, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Biallelic germline mutations affecting NTHL1 predispose carriers to adenomatous polyposis and colorectal cancer, but the complete phenotype is unknown. We describe 29 individuals carrying biallelic germline NTHL1 mutations from 17 families, of which 26 developed one (n = 10) or multiple (n = 16) malignancies in 14 different tissues. An unexpected high breast cancer incidence was observed in female carriers (60%). Mutational signature analysis of 14 tumors from 7 organs revealed that NTHL1 deficiency underlies the main mutational process in all but one of the tumors (93%). These results reveal NTHL1 as a multi-tumor predisposition gene with a high lifetime risk for extracolonic cancers and a typical mutational signature observed across tumor types, which can assist in the recognition of this syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccell.2018.12.011DOI Listing
February 2019

Cancer Risks for PMS2-Associated Lynch Syndrome.

J Clin Oncol 2018 10 30;36(29):2961-2968. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Sanne W. ten Broeke, Heleen M. van der Klift, Carli M.J. Tops, Manon Suerink, Frederik J. Hes, Hans F.A. Vasen, Juul T. Wijnen, and Maartje Nielsen, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden; Encarna Gomez Garcia, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht; Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Arjen R. Mensenkamp, and Liesbeth Spruijt, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; Tom G.W. Letteboer, University Medical Center, Utrecht; Theo A.M. van Os and Egbert J.W. Redeker, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Maran J.W. Olderode-Berends and Yvonne J. Vos, University of Groningen; University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen; Anja Wagner, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Stefan Aretz, University of Bonn; University Hospital Bonn, Bonn; Christoph Engel, Leipzig University; Medizinisch Genetisches Zentrum Bayerstr, Leipzig; Magnus von Knebel Doeberitz, University of Heidelberg; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg; Pål Møller, University of Witten-Herdecke, Wuppertal; Nils Rahner, Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf; Hans K. Schackert, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden; Verena Steinke-Lange, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV Campus Innenstadt, Klinikum der Universität München, Munich, Germany; Pål Møller, The Norwegian Radium Hospital; Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Inge Bernstein, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, and Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Daniel D. Buchanan, Mark Clendenning, John L. Hopper, Mark A. Jenkins, Christophe Rosty, Ingrid Winship, and Aung Ko Win, The University of Melbourne; Daniel D. Buchanan, Ingrid Winship, and Aung Ko Win, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria; Rodney Scott, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia; Albert de la Chapelle, Heather L. Hampel, Rachel Pearlman, and Leigha Senter, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH; Gabriel Capella and Marta Pineda, Institut d'Investigació Biomédica de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain; Steven Gallinger, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Jane C. Figueiredo and Robert Haile, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Loic Le Marchand, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; Annika Lindblom, Karolinska Institutet; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Noralane M. Lindor, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ; Polly A. Newcomb, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; University of Washington, Seattle, WA; and Stephen Thibodeau, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Purpose: Lynch syndrome due to pathogenic variants in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 is predominantly associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer, although extracolonic cancers have been described within the Lynch tumor spectrum. However, the age-specific cumulative risk (penetrance) of these cancers is still poorly defined for PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome. Using a large data set from a worldwide collaboration, our aim was to determine accurate penetrance measures of cancers for carriers of heterozygous pathogenic PMS2 variants.

Methods: A modified segregation analysis was conducted that incorporated both genotyped and nongenotyped relatives, with conditioning for ascertainment to estimates corrected for bias. Hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% CIs were estimated for each cancer site for mutation carriers compared with the general population, followed by estimation of penetrance.

Results: In total, 284 families consisting of 4,878 first- and second-degree family members were included in the analysis. PMS2 mutation carriers were at increased risk for colorectal cancer (cumulative risk to age 80 years of 13% [95% CI, 7.9% to 22%] for males and 12% [95% CI, 6.7% to 21%] for females) and endometrial cancer (13% [95% CI, 7.0%-24%]), compared with the general population (6.6%, 4.7%, and 2.4%, respectively). There was no clear evidence of an increased risk of ovarian, gastric, hepatobiliary, bladder, renal, brain, breast, prostate, or small bowel cancer.

Conclusion: Heterozygous PMS2 mutation carriers were at small increased risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer but not for any other Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. This finding justifies that PMS2-specific screening protocols could be restricted to colonoscopies. The role of risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for PMS2 mutation carriers needs further discussion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2018.78.4777DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6349460PMC
October 2018

Molecular Background of Colorectal Tumors From Patients With Lynch Syndrome Associated With Germline Variants in PMS2.

Gastroenterology 2018 09 29;155(3):844-851. Epub 2018 Jul 29.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background & Aims: Germline variants in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 (EPCAM), MSH6, or PMS2 cause Lynch syndrome. Patients with these variants have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancers (CRCs) that differ from sporadic CRCs in genetic and histologic features. It has been a challenge to study CRCs associated with PMS2 variants (PMS2-associated CRCs) because these develop less frequently and in older patients than CRCs with variants in other mismatch repair genes.

Methods: We analyzed 20 CRCs associated with germline variants in PMS2, 22 sporadic CRCs, 18 CRCs with germline variants in MSH2, and 24 CRCs from patients with germline variants in MLH1. Tumor tissue blocks were collected from Dutch pathology departments in 2017. After extraction of tumor DNA, we used a platform designed to detect approximately 3,000 somatic hotspot variants in 55 genes (including KRAS, APC, CTNNB1, and TP53). Somatic variant frequencies were compared using the Fisher exact test.

Results: None of the PMS2-associated CRCs contained any somatic variants in the catenin-β gene (CTNNB1), which encodes β-catenin, whereas 14 of 24 MLH1-associated CRCs (58%) contained variants in CTNNB1. Half the PMS2-associated CRCs contained KRAS variants, but only 20% of these were in hotspots that encoded G12D or G13D. These hotspot variants occurred more frequently in CRCs associated with variants in MLH1 (37.5%; P = .44) and MSH2 (71.4%; P = .035) than in those associated with variants in PMS2.

Conclusions: In a genetic analysis of 84 colorectal tumors, we found tumors from patients with PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome to be distinct from colorectal tumors associated with defects in other mismatch repair genes. This might account for differences in development and less frequent occurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2018.05.020DOI Listing
September 2018

Findings Linking Mismatch Repair Mutation With Age at Endometrial and Ovarian Cancer Onset in Lynch Syndrome.

JAMA Oncol 2018 06;4(6):889-890

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.0256DOI Listing
June 2018

SNP association study in PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome.

Fam Cancer 2018 10;17(4):507-515

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Lynch syndrome (LS) patients are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Phenotypic variability might in part be explained by common susceptibility loci identified in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Previous studies focused mostly on MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 carriers, with conflicting results. We aimed to determine the role of GWAS SNPs in PMS2 mutation carriers. A cohort study was performed in 507 PMS2 carriers (124 CRC cases), genotyped for 24 GWAS SNPs, including SNPs at 11q23.1 and 8q23.3. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a weighted Cox regression analysis to correct for ascertainment bias. Discrimination was assessed with a concordance statistic in a bootstrap cross-validation procedure. Individual SNPs only had non-significant associations with CRC occurrence with HRs lower than 2, although male carriers of allele A at rs1321311 (6p21.31) may have increased risk of CRC (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.0). A polygenic risk score (PRS) based on 24 HRs had an HR of 2.6 (95% CI 1.5-4.6) for the highest compared to the lowest quartile, but had no discriminative ability (c statistic 0.52). Previously suggested SNPs do not modify CRC risk in PMS2 carriers. Future large studies are needed for improved risk stratification among Lynch syndrome patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-017-0061-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182583PMC
October 2018

Comprehensive Mutation Analysis of PMS2 in a Large Cohort of Probands Suspected of Lynch Syndrome or Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

Hum Mutat 2016 11 21;37(11):1162-1179. Epub 2016 Aug 21.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations cause 5%-15% of Lynch syndrome, a midlife cancer predisposition, whereas biallelic PMS2 mutations cause approximately 60% of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a rare childhood cancer syndrome. Recently improved DNA- and RNA-based strategies are applied to overcome problematic PMS2 mutation analysis due to the presence of pseudogenes and frequent gene conversion events. Here, we determined PMS2 mutation detection yield and mutation spectrum in a nationwide cohort of 396 probands. Furthermore, we studied concordance between tumor IHC/MSI (immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability) profile and mutation carrier state. Overall, we found 52 different pathogenic PMS2 variants explaining 121 Lynch syndrome and nine CMMRD patients. In vitro mismatch repair assays suggested pathogenicity for three missense variants. Ninety-one PMS2 mutation carriers (70%) showed isolated loss of PMS2 in their tumors, for 31 (24%) no or inconclusive IHC was available, and eight carriers (6%) showed discordant IHC (presence of PMS2 or loss of both MLH1 and PMS2). Ten cases with isolated PMS2 loss (10%; 10/97) harbored MLH1 mutations. We confirmed that recently improved mutation analysis provides a high yield of PMS2 mutations in patients with isolated loss of PMS2 expression. Application of universal tumor prescreening methods will however miss some PMS2 germline mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23052DOI Listing
November 2016

A PMS2-specific colorectal surveillance guideline.

Genet Med 2015 Aug;17(8):684

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2015.91DOI Listing
August 2015

The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers.

Genet Med 2016 Apr 25;18(4):405-9. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported variability in severity of the phenotype.

Methods: European PMS2 mutation carriers (n = 381) were grouped and compared based on RNA expression and whether the mutation was inherited paternally or maternally.

Results: Mutation carriers with loss of RNA expression (group 1) had a significantly lower age at CRC diagnosis (51.1 years vs. 60.0 years, P = 0.035) and a lower age at EC diagnosis (55.8 years vs. 61.0 years, P = 0.2, nonsignificant) compared with group 2 (retention of RNA expression). Furthermore, group 1 showed slightly higher, but nonsignificant, hazard ratios (HRs) for both CRC (HR: 1.31, P = 0.38) and EC (HR: 1.22, P = 0.72). No evidence for a significant parent-of-origin effect was found for either CRC or EC.

Conclusions: PMS2 mutation carriers with retention of RNA expression developed CRC 9 years later than those with loss of RNA expression. If confirmed, this finding would justify a delay in surveillance for these cases. Cancer risk was not influenced by a parent-of-origin effect.Genet Med 18 4, 405-409.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2015.83DOI Listing
April 2016

Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk.

J Clin Oncol 2015 Feb 15;33(4):319-25. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

Sanne W. ten Broeke, Carli M. Tops, Heleen M. van der Klift, Manon Suerink, Frederik J. Hes, Hans F. Vasen, Maartje Nielsen, and Juul T. Wijnen, Leiden University Medical Center; Hans F. Vasen, The Netherlands Foundation for the Detection of Hereditary Tumors, Leiden; Richard M. Brohet, Research Center Linnaeus Institute, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp; Mary E. Velthuizen and Tom G.W. Letteboer, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht; Encarna Gomez Garcia, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht; Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Arjen R. Mensenkamp, and Liesbeth Spruijt, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; Fred H. Menko, Vrije Universiteit, University Medical Center; Theo A. van Os and Bert J.W. Redeker, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Rolf H. Sijmons and Yvonne J. Vos, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen; Anja Wagner, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Inge Bernstein, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg; Inge Bernstein, Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Registry, Hvidovre University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark; Gabriel Capellá Munar, Hereditary Cancer Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Institut D'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; Annika Lindblom, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna; Pal Moller, Research Group Inherited Cancer, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; and Nils Rahner, Institute of Human Genetics, University of Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.

Purpose: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers.

Methods: Data were collected from 98 PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers.

Results: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52 years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P < .001). Significant SIRs were observed for cancers of the small bowel, ovaries, breast, and renal pelvis.

Conclusion: CRC and EC risks were found to be markedly lower than those previously reported for the other MMR. However, these risks embody the isolated risk of carrying a PMS2 mutation, and it should be noted that we observed a substantial variation in cancer phenotype within and between families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2014.57.8088DOI Listing
February 2015