Publications by authors named "Sanne B E Hoeks"

5 Publications

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TH17 differentiation capacity develops within the first 3 months of life.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014 Mar 1;133(3):891-4.e5. Epub 2013 Nov 1.

Center for Molecular and Cellular Intervention, Laboratory for Translational Immunology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2013.09.022DOI Listing
March 2014

Defective TH17 development in human neonatal T cells involves reduced RORC2 mRNA content.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Sep 29;132(3):754-756.e3. Epub 2013 May 29.

Department of Pediatric Immunology, Center for Molecular and Cellular Intervention CMCI, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2013.04.014DOI Listing
September 2013

Cytokine assays: an assessment of the preparation and treatment of blood and tissue samples.

Methods 2013 May 19;61(1):10-7. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Department of Pediatric Immunology (KC01.069.0), Centre for Molecular and Cellular Intervention, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Cytokines are key components of the innate and adaptive immune system. As pivotal players in the progression or regression of a pathological process, these molecules provide a window through which diseases can be monitored and can thus act as biomarkers. In order to measure cytokine levels, a plethora of protocols can be applied. These methods include bioassays, protein microarrays, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) electrochemiluminescence and bead based multiplex immunoassays (MIA). Due to the interaction and activity of cytokines, multiplex immunoassays are at the forefront of cytokine analysis by allowing multiple cytokines to be measured in parallel. However, even with optimized protocols, sample standardization needs to occur before these proteins can optimally act as biomarkers. This review describes various factors influencing the levels of cytokines measured in plasma, serum, dried blood spots and tissue biopsies, focusing on sample collection and handling, long term storage and the repetitive use of samples. By analyzing how each of these factors influences protein levels, it is concluded that samples should be stored at low temperatures in order to maintain cytokine stability. In addition, within a study, sample manipulations should be kept the same, with measurement protocols being chosen for their compatibility with the research in question. By having a clear understanding of what factors influence cytokine levels and how to overcome these technical issues, minimally confounded data can be obtained and cytokines can achieve optimal biomarker activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2013.04.005DOI Listing
May 2013

Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphism is associated with preterm birth.

Pediatr Res 2007 Oct;62(4):474-6

Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 AB, The Netherlands.

Evidence is increasing for a role of polymorphisms in maternal or fetal innate immune response genes in preterm birth. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important receptors in the innate immunity. The genotype distribution of two TLR2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one TLR4 SNP were determined among 524 neonates and associated with gestational age (GA). Genomic DNA was isolated from prospectively collected blood samples and polymorphisms in TLR2 (T-16934A, RS4696480 and Arg753Gln, RS5743708) and TLR4 (Thr399Ile, RS4986791) were determined using sequence specific primers by PCR. Allele frequencies of two TLR2 SNPs and one TLR4 SNP were analyzed according to prematurity. Analysis among 305 infants, after exclusion of infants born after multiple pregnancy or because of preeclampsia, revealed significantly shorter GAs for infants carrying two polymorphic TLR2 alleles (-16934TA/AA and 753ArgGln/GlnGln) compared with infants carrying one polymorphic and one wild-type allele or two wild-type alleles (median GA 30.6 wk versus 34.1-36.8 wk, respectively, p < 0.02). Carriage of two variant TLR2 alleles potentially leads to aberrant innate immune responses, which may have contributed to very preterm birth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e31813c9401DOI Listing
October 2007