Publications by authors named "Sanghon Park"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The novel prognostic value of postoperative follow-up lateral spread response after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm.

J Neurosurg 2021 Sep 3:1-5. Epub 2021 Sep 3.

Departments of1Neurosurgery.

Objective: The lateral spread response (LSR) is an aberrant electrophysiological response in which a stimulus on one branch of the facial nerve spills over to other branches of the nerve, which can be captured by electrodes near each branch. The authors performed this study to evaluate the prognostic value of the follow-up LSR with a sufficient time interval from intraoperative LSR (IO-LSR) after microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS), excluding the interference of various intraoperative situations.

Methods: A total of 247 patients treated with MVD for HFS between June 2011 and March 2019 were enrolled in this study. The IO-LSR was routinely evaluated in all patients. The LSR was checked again on postoperative day (POD) 2 after surgery (POD2-LSR). A total of 228 patients (92.3%) were considered cured at the last clinical follow-up.

Results: The IO-LSR disappeared in 189 patients (76.5%), and among them, 181 patients (95.8%) were cured 1 year after surgery. The POD2-LSR disappeared in 193 patients (78.1%), and 185 patients (95.9%) among them were cured. Among the 189 patients in which the IO-LSR disappeared, the POD2-LSR reappeared in 26 patients (13.8%). In contrast, the POD2-LSR disappeared in 30 (51.7%) of 58 patients for whom the IO-LSR continued at the end of surgery. When classified into groups according to the status of the IO-LSR and POD2-LSR, in the group of patients in whom both LSRs disappeared, the cure rate was 98.2%, which was significantly higher than that of the other 3 groups (p < 0.05, Cochran-Armitage trend test). The use of both LSRs was found to be significantly associated with better predictability (p < 0.05, McNemar's test).

Conclusions: Postoperative follow-up LSR examination may be beneficial in predicting clinical outcomes after MVD for HFS, especially when considered together with IO-LSR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2021.3.JNS21137DOI Listing
September 2021

The 5% Lidocaine Patch for Decreasing Postoperative Pain and Rescue Opioid Use in Sternotomy: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Trial.

Clin Ther 2020 12 20;42(12):2311-2320. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Purpose: Poststernotomy pain (PSP), a primary concern after sternotomy, can negatively affect patients' satisfaction with surgery and quality of life. Many clinical trials have been conducted to examine the usefulness of lidocaine patches (LPs) for postoperative pain control for multiple types of surgery; however, the results of these trials are inconsistent. In addition, little is known about the use of LPs after cardiac procedures that require sternotomy. This prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to determine the efficacy of the 5% LP application at the sternotomy site for reducing PSP and rescue opioid consumption.

Methods: The patients were randomly assigned to receive either the 5% LP or the placebo patch on each side of the incision site immediately after the surgery. The intensity of pain at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the patch application; the total dose of rescue opioids; incidence of nausea, vomiting, and sleep disturbance; and use of antiemetics were compared between the 2 groups.

Findings: Fifty-seven (31 in the LP group and 26 in the placebo group) patients were included. The pain intensity was significantly lower in the LP group at each time point (66%-68% pain reduction, P < 0.001, interaction of time × treatment P = 0.69). In addition, the total dose of rescue opioids used for 48 h was significantly lower in the L group (27.2% reduction, P = 0.008). No significant differences were found in other outcome variables between the 2 groups.

Implications: The application of a 5% LP on each side of the sternotomy site can reduce PSP and additional opioid use without significant adverse effects in patients undergoing sternotomy. Thus, it can be considered as a standard and routine modality along with other analgesic medications for the management of PSP. Clinical Trial Registry in South Korea identifier: KCT0000476.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.10.011DOI Listing
December 2020

The Effect of a Transdermal Scopolamine Patch on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting after Retromastoid Craniectomy with Microvascular Decompression: A Preliminary Single Center, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Clin Med 2020 Jan 7;9(1). Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do 13620, Korea.

We performed this prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial to identify the effect of a preoperative prophylactic transdermal scopolamine (TDS) patch on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after retromastoid craniectomy with microvascular decompression (RMC-MVD). We recruited 38 patients undergoing RMC-MVD and randomized them into two groups: the TDS group ( = 19, application of the TDS patch) and placebo group ( = 19, application of a sham patch). Nausea (as a self-reported 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) score; range, 0 (no nausea) to 10 (worst nausea)), vomiting, and the use of antiemetics were the primary endpoints. There was no significant difference in terms of the incidence of PONV (73.7% in the TDS group and 78.9% in the placebo group; = 1.00) between the groups. However, the mean nausea VAS score was significantly different at arrival to the general ward (0.93 ± 1.71 in the TDS group vs. 2.52 ± 2.85 in the placebo group; p = 0.046), and throughout the study period (0.03 ± 0.07 in the TDS group vs. 0.44 ± 0.71 in the placebo group; p = 0.029). Rescue antiemetics were more frequently used in the placebo group than in the TDS group (9 (47.4%) vs. 2 (10.5%), respectively; = 0.029). The mean number of antiemetics used throughout the study period was significantly higher in the placebo group than in the TDS group (1.37 ± 2.19 vs. 0.16 ± 0.50, respectively; p = 0.029). The preoperative prophylactic use of a TDS patch was safe and effective in the management of PONV after RMC-MVD in terms of the severity of PONV and the use of rescue antiemetics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019292PMC
January 2020

A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist attenuates neurological deficits following spinal cord ischemia in rats.

J Vasc Surg 2014 Apr 2;59(4):1084-9. Epub 2013 Jul 2.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address:

Objective: Neuroprotective effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist in cerebral ischemia have been reported, but the effect of a PPARγ agonist on spinal cord ischemia has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a PPARγ agonist on spinal cord ischemia. Pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, was administered in a rat model of spinal cord ischemia, and the extent of neurological damage and histological alterations were assessed.

Methods: Forty-five rats were randomly enrolled into one of the three groups: (1) pioglitazone group (group PIO): rats were treated with pioglitazone 24 hours before ischemia; (2) control group (group C): rats were treated with the same volume of saline 24 hours before ischemia; and (3) sham group (group sham): rats were treated with the same volume of saline 24 hours before the sham surgery. Spinal cord ischemia was induced using a balloon-tipped catheter placed on the proximal descending aorta. Neurologic function was assessed using the motor deficit index (0 = normal, 6 = complete paralysis) during the 48 hours after reperfusion. Histological and biochemical evaluations were then performed.

Results: Compared with group C, group PIO presented with lower motor deficit index 48 hours after reperfusion (5.0 [4.0-6.0] vs 3.0 [2.0-3.0]; group C vs group PIO, respectively; P < .001). Group PIO presented with a higher number of normal motor neurons (10.7 [8.1-11.9] vs 14.7 [14.0-15.3]; group C vs group PIO, respectively; P = .009) and a smaller area of infarcts (48.4% [46.3%-54.0%] vs 16.8% [11.5%-18.3%]; group C vs group PIO, respectively; P = .009) when compared with group C. The degree of inflammatory reactions, assessed by microglia activities, was significantly reduced in group PIO. Oxidative stress level, assessed using malonydialdehyde assay, was significantly reduced in group PIO relative to group C (192.21% [173.5%-206.4%] of sham vs 141.1% [131.7%-152.1%] of sham; group C vs group PIO, respectively; P = .007). The sham group exhibited no abnormality upon neurological or histological examination.

Conclusions: PPARγ agonist pioglitazone pretreatment significantly reduces infarct volume and attenuates neurological deficits following spinal cord ischemia. The possible mechanism of neuroprotection by PPARγ agonist may involve modulation of inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2013.04.047DOI Listing
April 2014
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