Publications by authors named "Sang-Me Lee"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Horizontal transfer of bla-carrying IncX3 plasmid between carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in a single patient.

J Infect 2020 11 13;81(5):816-846. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Infectious Diseases Team, Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2020.07.013DOI Listing
November 2020

Identification of an extensively drug-resistant Escherichia coli clinical strain harboring mcr-1 and bla in Korea.

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2020 12 14;73(12):852-858. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Infectious Diseases Team, Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

The development of colistin resistance in carbapenem-resistant strains poses a serious public health problem. In this study, we collected 249 carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from patients in Seoul in 2018, and screened all isolates for colistin resistance and for the presence of mobile colistin resistance (mcr) genes. Colistin-resistant strains were further analyzed using multilocus sequence typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of antibiotic resistance determinants, plasmid transconjugation, and whole-genome sequencing. Three of the 249 carbapenem-resistant isolates were resistant to colistin, and mcr-1 was detected in one isolate (SECR18-0888), which belonged to sequence type 156 and was resistant to all antibiotics tested except tigecycline. The mcr-1.1 gene was located on an ~62 kb self-transferable IncI2 plasmid along with the bla gene, and the bla, bla, qepA1, and rmtB genes were additionally detected in SECR18-0888. As an extensively drug-resistant E. coli strain producing MCR-1 and NDM-1 was identified in Korea for the first time, continued monitoring of colistin resistance in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae should be reinforced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41429-020-0350-1DOI Listing
December 2020

Emergence of NDM-4 and OXA-181 carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

J Glob Antimicrob Resist 2020 03 13;20:332-333. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Infectious Diseases Team, Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgar.2020.01.020DOI Listing
March 2020

Determination of 4-Methylimidazole and 2-Acetyl-4()- tetrahydroxybutylimidazole in Caramel Color and Processed Foods by LC-MS/MS.

Prev Nutr Food Sci 2013 Dec;18(4):263-8

Department of Food and Drug, Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment, Seoul 138-701, Korea.

In this study, the quick HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous separation of 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydrox-ybuthylimidazole (THI) and 4-(5)-methylimidazole (4-MI) in alkaline medium was used for caramel color and processed foods in Korea. After a simple sample pretreatment, 51 4-MI-labeled samples were positive for 4-MI and 2 also contained THI. The concentration of 4-MI was 260.5 ~ 24,499.3 μg/kg in caramel color, less than LOD ~ 1,712.5 μg/kg in sauce, 1,242.3, 5,972.2 μg/kg in balsamic vinegar, 2,118.3 ~ 5,802.4 μg/kg in complex seasoning, 82.7 ~ 5,110.6 μg/kg in curry, and 29.9 ~ 464.4 μg/kg in soft drinks. The recovery rate of 4-MI was 97.1 ~ 111.0% in sauce and 81.9 ~ 110.0% in powder and that of THI was 83.6 ~ 106.4% in sauce and 61.2 ~ 99.4% in powder. Our results concluded a safe amount of 4-MI and THI compared to the limit of Korea additive code but the processed foods do not have a limit of caramel color and 4-MI in Korea. Therefore, research and monitoring of 4-MI and THI is needed for processed foods in Korea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3746/pnf.2013.18.4.263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3925216PMC
December 2013

Total mercury, methylmercury and ethylmercury in marine fish and marine fishery products sold in Seoul, Korea.

Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill 2011 30;4(4):268-74. Epub 2011 Nov 30.

a Seoul Metropolitan Government Research Institute of Public Health and Environment , Seoul 427-070 , Republic of Korea.

In 2009, a survey of 177 samples of fish and fishery products from the markets in Seoul was carried out to investigate total mercury and organic mercury (methylmercury) concentrations and to establish a correlation, if any, between total and organic mercury levels. Concentrations of total and organic mercury in canned tuna ranged 0.001-2.581 and 0.003-1.307 mg/kg, respectively; those for fish, such as cod or salmon, ranged 0.012-2.529 and 0.021-0.507 mg/kg, respectively. Ethylmercury was not detected. More than 50% of total mercury in the samples existed as organic mercury. The correlation coefficients (r(2)) between total mercury and methylmercury concentrations of fish and fishery products found to have methylmercury were 0.844 and 0.976, respectively, which was statistically significant. There was a higher correlation in fishery products than in fish. Although there was no product in which mercury exceeded the standard set by the Food Code in 2008, with the exception of marlin steak, a processed food, which contained 1.307 mg/kg methylmercury. None exceeded the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for mercury. Collectively, the results indicate that fish or fishery products marketed in Seoul, with the exception of marlin, have low levels of total or organic mercury and, thus, intake of these products is not a risk to public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19393210.2011.638087DOI Listing
December 2014