Publications by authors named "Sandra Sanchez"

45 Publications

Three-dimensional mapping of neurofibrillary tangle burden in the human medial temporal lobe.

Brain 2021 Jul 14. Epub 2021 Jul 14.

Human Neuroanatomy Laboratory, Neuromax CSIC Associated Unit, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete, Spain.

Tau protein neurofibrillary tangles are closely linked to neuronal/synaptic loss and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Our knowledge of the pattern of neurofibrillary tangle progression in the human brain, critical to the development of imaging biomarkers and interpretation of in vivo imaging studies in Alzheimer's disease, is based on conventional two-dimensional histology studies that only sample the brain sparsely. To address this limitation, ex vivo MRI and dense serial histological imaging in 18 human medial temporal lobe specimens (age 75.3 ± 11.4 years, 45 to 93) were used to construct three-dimensional quantitative maps of neurofibrillary tangle burden in the medial temporal lobe at individual and group levels. Group-level maps were obtained in the space of an in vivo brain template, and neurofibrillary tangle was measured in specific anatomical regions defined in this template. Three-dimensional maps of neurofibrillary tangle burden reveal significant variation along the anterior-posterior axis. While early neurofibrillary tangle pathology is thought to be confined to the transentorhinal region, we find similar levels of burden in this region and other medial temporal lobe subregions, including amygdala, temporopolar cortex, and subiculum/cornu Ammonis 1 hippocampal subfields. Overall, the three-dimensional maps of neurofibrillary tangle burden presented here provide more complete information about the distribution of this neurodegenerative pathology in the region of the cortex where it first emerges in Alzheimer's disease, and may help inform the field about the patterns of pathology spread, as well as support development and validation of neuroimaging biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awab262DOI Listing
July 2021

Molecular and cell biological analysis of SwrB in .

J Bacteriol 2021 Jun 14:JB0022721. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

1Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington IN 47408.

Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are elaborate nanomachines that form the core of the bacterial flagellum and injectisome of pathogens. The machines not only secrete proteins like virulence factors but also secrete the structural components for their own assembly. Moreover, proper construction requires complex regulation to ensure that the parts are roughly secreted in the order in which they are assembled. Here we explore a poorly understood activator of the flagellar T3SS activation in called SwrB. To aid mechanistic understanding, we determine the rules for subcellular punctate localization, the topology with respect to the membrane, and critical residues required for SwrB function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00227-21DOI Listing
June 2021

COVID-19 inpatient cohorting team: Successes and lessons learned.

Nurs Manage 2021 05;52(5):38-45

At Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Mass., Lauren T.S. Clark is a cardiac surgery clinical nurse and lead quality improvement management system fellow, Sandra Sanchez is the office of bed management and transfer center nursing director, Cynthia Phelan is an associate chief nurse, Lauge Sokol-Hessner is the patient safety medical director, Kendra Bruce is a cardiac medicine unit-based educator, and Susan DeSanto-Madeya is a nurse scientist and an associate professor at the University of Rhode Island College of Nursing in Kingston, R.I.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NUMA.0000737624.29748.4eDOI Listing
May 2021

Ivabradine Induces Cardiac Protection against Myocardial Infarction by Preventing Cyclophilin-A Secretion in Pigs under Coronary Ischemia/Reperfusion.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 12;22(6). Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Hospital Ramón y Cajal Research Unit (IRYCIS), Cardiology Department, Universidad Francisco de Vitoria, 28223 Madrid, Spain.

In response to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion, proteolysis mediated by extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and its secreted ligand cyclophilin-A (CyPA) significantly contributes to cardiac injury and necrosis. Here, we aimed to investigate if, in addition to the effect on the funny current (I(f)), Ivabradine may also play a role against cardiac necrosis by reducing EMMPRIN/CyPA-mediated cardiac inflammation. In a porcine model of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (IR), we found that administration of 0.3 mg/kg Ivabradine significantly improved cardiac function and reduced cardiac necrosis by day 7 after IR, detecting a significant increase in cardiac CyPA in the necrotic compared to the risk areas, which was inversely correlated with the levels of circulating CyPA detected in plasma samples from the same subjects. In testing whether Ivabradine may regulate the levels of CyPA, no changes in tissue CyPA were found in healthy pigs treated with 0.3 mg/kg Ivabradine, but interestingly, when analyzing the complex EMMPRIN/CyPA, rather high glycosylated EMMPRIN, which is required for EMMPRIN-mediated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation and increased CyPA bonding to low-glycosylated forms of EMMPRIN were detected by day 7 after IR in pigs treated with Ivabradine. To study the mechanism by which Ivabradine may prevent secretion of CyPA, we first found that Ivabradine was time-dependent in inhibiting co-localization of CyPA with the granule exocytosis marker vesicle-associated membrane protein 1 (VAMP1). However, Ivabradine had no effect on mRNA expression nor in the proteasome and lysosome degradation of CyPA. In conclusion, our results point toward CyPA, its ligand EMMPRIN, and the complex CyPA/EMMPRIN as important targets of Ivabradine in cardiac protection against IR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22062902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8001911PMC
March 2021

CwlQ Is Required for Swarming Motility but Not Flagellar Assembly in Bacillus subtilis.

J Bacteriol 2021 04 21;203(10). Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington Indiana, USA

Lytic enzymes play an essential role in the remodeling of bacterial peptidoglycan (PG), an extracellular mesh-like structure that retains the membrane in the context of high internal osmotic pressure. Peptidoglycan must be unfailingly stable to preserve cell integrity, but must also be dynamically remodeled for the cell to grow, divide, and insert macromolecular machines. The flagellum is one such macromolecular machine that transits the PG, and flagellar insertion is aided by localized activity of a dedicated PG lyase in Gram-negative bacteria. To date, there is no known dedicated lyase in Gram-positive bacteria for the insertion of flagella. Here, we take a reverse-genetic candidate-gene approach and find that cells mutated for the lytic transglycosylase CwlQ exhibit a severe defect in flagellum-dependent swarming motility. We further show that CwlQ is expressed by the motility sigma factor SigD and is secreted by the type III secretion system housed inside the flagellum. Nonetheless, cells with mutations of CwlQ remain proficient for flagellar biosynthesis even when mutated in combination with four other lyases related to motility (LytC, LytD, LytF, and CwlO). The PG lyase (or lyases) essential for flagellar synthesis in , if any, remains unknown. Bacteria are surrounded by a wall of peptidoglycan and early work in was the first to suggest that bacteria needed to enzymatically remodel the wall to permit insertion of the flagellum. No PG remodeling enzyme alone or in combination, however, has been found to be essential for flagellar assembly in Here, we take a reverse-genetic candidate-gene approach and find that the PG lytic transglycosylase CwlQ is required for swarming motility. Subsequent characterization determined that while CwlQ was coexpressed with motility genes and is secreted by the flagellar secretion apparatus, it was not required for flagellar synthesis. The PG lyase needed for flagellar assembly in remains unknown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00029-21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088609PMC
April 2021

How to adapt sexual and reproductive health services to the needs and circumstances of trans people- a qualitative study in Colombia.

Int J Equity Health 2020 10 26;19(1):148. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Asociación Profamilia, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia.

Background: People living a trans-life require access to equitable healthcare services, policies and research that address their needs. However, trans people have experienced different forms of violence, discrimination, stigma, and unfair access barriers when dealing with healthcare providers. Therefore, adapting sexual and reproductive health services with the purpose of providing more equitable, inclusive and discrimination-free healthcare services is an urgent need. The article presents an example of how operative research can be used in order to adjust sexual and reproductive healthcare services to trans people's needs, identities and circumstances.

Methods: This is a qualitative study written from a constructivist perspective, and it is based on the voices and experiences of trans people in four major cities in Colombia. The research used a combination of focus groups of discussion (n = 6) and in-depth interviews with trans people (n = 13) in Barranquilla, Bogota, Cali and Medellin. This research had two specific objectives: i) identifying the main sexual and reproductive health needs of people living a trans-life; and ii) generating new evidence in order to guide the adaptation of sexual and reproductive health services centered to trans people's needs, identities, and circumstances. Qualitative data codification and analysis was using NVivo.

Results: Once access barriers to sexual and reproductive health services, unmet sexual and reproductive health needs were identified, the research helped define strategies to adapt sexual and reproductive health services to the needs, identities, and circumstances of people living a trans-life in Colombia. Amongst the main barriers found were healthcare costs, lack of insurance, stigmatization, discrimination and abuse by health care providers. Perhaps among the most notable sexual and reproductive health needs presented were trans-specific services such as sensitive assistance for the transition process, endocrinology appointments, and sex reaffirmation surgeries.

Conclusions: The evidence obtained from this research allowed Profamilia, a Colombian healthcare provider, to adapt the sexual and reproductive health services it provides to people living a trans-life in Colombia. Furthermore, it was possible for Profamilia to design and implement an inclusive sexual and reproductive health program that specifically addresses trans people's needs, identities, and circumstances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12939-020-01250-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7586656PMC
October 2020

[Social inequalities related to antimicrobial resistance in in ColombiaDesigualdades sociais relacionadas à resistência antimicrobiana de N. gonorrhoeae na Colômbia].

Rev Panam Salud Publica 2020 23;44:e49. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Dirección de Investigaciones, Asociación Profamilia Bogotá D.C. Colombia Dirección de Investigaciones, Asociación Profamilia, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia.

Objective: Measure social inequalities in antimicrobial resistance in in Colombia.

Methods: Ecological study using a multi-panel of data, disaggregated at the subnational level, and using isolations of as a proxy for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) between 2009 and 2018. A sociodemographic characterization, an analysis of the antimicrobial sensitivity of isolations of , and a measurement of inequalities in AMR in were conducted using the slope index of inequality, the relative inequality index, and the concentration index.

Results: The findings indicate antimicrobial resistance to penicillin (50.7%) and tetracycline (67.3%) in isolations of , and the existence of absolute and relative inequalities during the study period. Access barriers to health services, not having received information on the prevention of sexually transmitted infections, basic unmet needs, and illiteracy explained the inequalities in AMR in .

Conclusions: Six recommendations emerged with a view to largely containing AMR in : i) increase awareness of safe sexual and reproductive health; ii) rethink how to deliver key messages with an equity approach; iii) improve information, prescription, and drug chain systems; iv) form coalitions to improve response and share objectives with the private sector; v) improve the availability and disaggregation of data; and vi) support research on inequalities in AMR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.26633/RPSP.2020.49DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7498285PMC
September 2020

A Hundred Years of Bacteriophages: Can Phages Replace Antibiotics in Agriculture and Aquaculture?

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 Aug 7;9(8). Epub 2020 Aug 7.

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 5706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Agriculture, together with aquaculture, supplies most of the foodstuffs required by the world human population to survive. Hence, bacterial diseases affecting either agricultural crops, fish, or shellfish not only cause large economic losses to producers but can even create food shortages, resulting in malnutrition, or even famine, in vulnerable populations. Years of antibiotic use in the prevention and the treatment of these infections have greatly contributed to the emergence and the proliferation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. This review addresses the urgent need for alternative strategies for the use of antibiotics, focusing on the use of bacteriophages (phages) as biocontrol agents. Phages are viruses that specifically infect bacteria; they are highly host-specific and represent an environmentally-friendly alternative to antibiotics to control and kill pathogenic bacteria. The information evaluated here highlights the effectiveness of phages in the control of numerous major pathogens that affect both agriculture and aquaculture, with special emphasis on scientific and technological aspects still requiring further development to establish phagotherapy as a real universal alternative to antibiotic treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080493DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7460141PMC
August 2020

Bacteriophages and Lysins as Possible Alternatives to Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Urinary Tract Infections.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 Jul 30;9(8). Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Urinary tract infections represent a major public health problem as the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains among uropathogens is causing the failure of many current treatments. The use of bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives to combat infectious diseases is an old approach that has been forgotten by the West for a long time, mostly due to the discovery and great success of antibiotics. In the present so-called "post-antibiotic era", many researchers are turning their attention to the re-discovered phage therapy, as an effective alternative to antibiotics. Phage therapy includes the use of natural or engineered phages, as well as their purified lytic enzymes to destroy pathogenic strains. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have been conducted, and these have proved the great potential for this therapy against uropathogenic bacteria. Nevertheless, to date, the lack of appropriate clinical trials has hindered its widespread clinic application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080466DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7460213PMC
July 2020

HHV8-positive, EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma-like large B cell lymphoma: expanding the spectrum of HHV8 and EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.

Int J Hematol 2020 Nov 11;112(5):734-740. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Hematopathology Unit, Department of Pathology, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV8) is a gamma herpesvirus known for its role in lymphoid neoplasms, especially in immunosuppressed patients. We describe the case of a 64-year-old male, without known immunodeficiency, with 1-year-long clinical history of mediastinal and abdominal lymphadenopathies and recurrent pulmonary infections. Histopathological evaluation of a mediastinal lymph node revealed the presence of scattered atypical large cells with Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg morphology in a background of lymphocytes and extensive areas of fibrosis. The large cells were positive for HHV8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), with a clonal pattern of IGH gene rearrangement. A descriptive diagnosis of "HHV8-positive, EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma-like large B-cell lymphoma" was rendered. Interestingly, the retrospective evaluation of a previous biopsy, diagnosed as reactive lymphadenitis, revealed the presence of HHV8- and EBV-positive cells, with a polyclonal pattern and a small peak corresponding to that of the most recent biopsy. This case presents diagnostic challenges due to the presence of particular features not clearly related to current HHV8-associated entities, and also suggests the possibility for disease progression in the spectrum of HHV8- and EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12185-020-02897-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7287409PMC
November 2020

Tn: a Third-Generation -Based Transposon System for Bacillus subtilis.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2020 05 5;86(10). Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful and unbiased genetic approach to answer fundamental biological questions. Here, we introduce an improved -based transposon system with enhanced stability during propagation and versatile applications in mutagenesis. We used a low-copy-number plasmid as a transposon delivery vehicle, which affords a lower frequency of unintended recombination during vector construction and propagation in We generated a variety of transposons allowing for gene disruption or artificial overexpression, each in combination with one of four different antibiotic resistance markers. In addition, we provide transposons that will report gene/protein expression due to transcriptional or translational coupling. We believe that the Tn system will help enhance the flexibility of future transposon modification and application in and other organisms. The stability of transposase-encoding vectors during cloning and propagation is crucial for the reliable application of transposons. Here, we increased the stability of the delivery vehicle in Moreover, the Tn transposon system will improve the application of forward genetic methods with an increased number of antibiotic resistance markers and the ability to generate unbiased green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to report on protein translation and subcellular localization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02893-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7205501PMC
May 2020

Unusual Variants of Follicular Lymphoma: Case-based Review.

Am J Surg Pathol 2020 03;44(3):329-339

Department of Hematopathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is one of the most frequently diagnosed lymphomas in the United States and Europe. The definition of and basic approach to diagnosis and grading of FL is essentially unchanged in the recently updated revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. FL is a biologically and histopathologically heterogeneous disease. Although there is an improved understanding of some FL variants and specific subtypes, there are cases whose recognition is particularly challenging, either because they have unusual features or represent examples of new or rare variants. Herein, we share a series of unusual and difficult to recognize FLs with the goal of increasing awareness of the expanding histopathologic variability in FL. Unusual FL discussed here include: FL with Castleman-like changes, FL with plasmacytic differentiation, and immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells in the setting of immunoglobulin G4-related disease, FL with marginal zone differentiation and involving mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue sites, diffuse FL variant expressing CD23 with STAT6 mutation, large B-cell lymphoma with IRF4 rearrangement, CD10-negative and MUM1-positive aggressive FL, and Epstein-Barr virus-positive FL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001399DOI Listing
March 2020

Hepatitis E virus in sheep in Italy.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2019 May 18;66(3):1120-1125. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Università degli Studi di Teramo, Teramo, Italy.

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the leading cause of human enterically transmitted viral hepatitis occurring around the world both as outbreaks and as sporadic cases. The accumulating literature indicates that domestic pigs and wild boars are the main reservoirs of genotype 3 and genotype 4 for human infections in industrialized countries. However, the recent identification of HEV from various animal species poses additional potential concerns for HEV zoonotic infection. In this study, the role of sheep as potential host of hepatitis E virus (HEV) was investigated. By screening 192 sheep from seven farms located in Abruzzo Region (Southern Italy), HEV-specific antibodies were detected in the sera of 41 animals (21.3%) whilst the RNA of HEV, genotype 3, was detected in 20 faecal (10.4%) and three serum samples (1.6%). Upon sequence analyses of a partial ORF2 gene region of eight HEV positive samples, the sheep sequences all grouped together within HEV genotype 3 subtype c, being most closely related to HEV strains identified in goat and wild boar from Abruzzo. This is the first study that demonstrates, serologically and molecularly, the presence of HEV in sheep population in a European country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13157DOI Listing
May 2019

Continuous Improvement and Employee Engagement, Part 2: Design, Implementation, and Outcomes of a Daily Management System.

J Nurs Adm 2018 Apr;48(4):209-215

Authors Affiliations: Senior Vice President for Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer (Ms Maurer), Nursing Director (Ms Browall and Ms Sanchez), Associate Chief Nurse (Ms Phelan and Ms Sulmonte), and Program Director (Ms Wandel), Patient Care Services, and Management Engineer (Ms Wang), Office of Improvement and Innovation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

A daily management system (DMS) can be used to implement continuous quality improvement and advance employee engagement. It can empower staff to identify problems in the care environment that impact quality or work flow and to address them on a daily basis. Through a DMS, improvement becomes the work of everyone, every day. The authors of this 2-part series describe their work to develop a DMS. Part 2 describes the implementation and outcomes of the program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NNA.0000000000000601DOI Listing
April 2018

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can be indistinguishable from other more common T-cell lymphomas. The University of Miami experience with a large cohort of cases.

Mod Pathol 2018 07 15;31(7):1046-1063. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Department of Pathology, Division of Hematopathology, University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Jackson Memorial Hospitals, Miami, FL, USA.

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, an aggressive T-cell neoplasm, is causally linked to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and based on this association has a distinct geographic distribution. In our United States-based practice, whose population is enriched for immigrants from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 endemic areas, we have identified that a subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in the absence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 identification, are indistinguishable from other more common T-cell neoplasms. We retrospectively gathered serology results for anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 antibody in patients diagnosed with T-cell neoplasms at our institution. A total of 220 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 positive patients with T-cell neoplasms were identified; 199 (91%) were correctly classified as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma or provisionally as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (serology testing pending). Twenty-one cases (9%) were initially misclassified, including the following: 13 presenting with skin +/- peripheral blood involvement and misclassified as mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome; 7 with lymphomatous disease, absence of leukemic involvement, and diffuse CD30 expression, misclassified as ALK- negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; 1 thought to represent T-prolymphocytic leukemia with TCL-1 gene rearrangement and diffuse marrow involvement. We also present an example of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which mimicked lymphoepithelioid variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma also with diffuse marrow involvement. A subset of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma can closely mimic a variety of other more common T-cell neoplasms. Due to its extreme clinicopathologic heterogeneity, identification of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma requires a high level of suspicion based on patient demographic alone, which should prompt anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1/2 serology testing in all T-cell neoplasms developing in patients of appropriate demographic. Absence of high level of suspicion, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is easily misclassified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41379-018-0037-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6931282PMC
July 2018

Bone Marrow-Liver-Spleen Type of Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated with Hemophagocytic Syndrome: A Rare Aggressive Extranodal Lymphoma.

Case Rep Hematol 2017 1;2017:8496978. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

Division of Hematopathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Miami and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL, USA.

Recently, an unusual subtype of large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) with distinctive clinicopathologic features has been recognized; it is characterized by involvement of bone marrow with or without liver and/or spleen, but no lymph node or other extranodal sites, usually associated with fever, anemia, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Because of this distinctive clinical presentation, it has been designated "bone marrow-liver-spleen" (BLS) type of LBCL. To date there is only one series of 11 cases of BLS type of LBCL with detailed clinical, pathologic, and cytogenetic data. Herein, we describe a case of BLS type LBCL presenting with associated HLH in a 73-year-old female. The bone marrow core biopsy showed cytologically atypical large lymphoma cells present in a scattered interstitial distribution and hemophagocytosis and infrequent large lymphoma cells were seen in the bone marrow aspirate smears. Circulating lymphoma cells were not seen in the peripheral blood smears. The patient underwent treatment with chemotherapy (R-CHOP) but unfortunately passed away 2 months after initial presentation. BLS type of LBCL is a very rare and clinically aggressive lymphoma whose identification may be delayed by clinicians and hematopathologists due to its unusual clinical presentation and pathologic features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/8496978DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5556984PMC
August 2017

Noncontact Cohesive Swimming of Bacteria in Two-Dimensional Liquid Films.

Phys Rev Lett 2017 Jul 5;119(1):018101. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

Department of Physics and Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.

Bacterial swimming in confined two-dimensional environments is ubiquitous in nature and in clinical settings. Characterizing individual interactions between swimming bacteria in 2D confinement will help to understand diverse microbial processes, such as bacterial swarming and biofilm formation. Here we report a novel motion pattern displayed by flagellated bacteria in 2D confinement: When two nearby cells align their moving directions, they tend to engage in cohesive swimming without direct cell body contact, as a result of hydrodynamic interaction but not flagellar intertwining. We further found that cells in cohesive swimming move with higher directional persistence, which can increase the effective diffusivity of cells by ∼3 times as predicted by computational modeling. As a conserved behavior for peritrichously flagellated bacteria, cohesive swimming in 2D confinement may be key to collective motion and self-organization in bacterial swarms; it may also promote bacterial dispersal in unsaturated soils and in interstitial space during infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.018101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5960272PMC
July 2017

Evaluation of depressive symptoms in mid-aged women: report of a multicenter South American study.

Menopause 2017 Nov;24(11):1282-1288

1Institute of Biomedicine, Research Area for Women's Health, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Católica de Santiago de Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Ecuador 2Enrique C. Sotomayor Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Cartagena, Cartagena, Colombia 4Universidad Andina de Cusco, Cusco, Peru 5Hospital Central Dr. Emilio Cubas, Instituto de Previsión Social, Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Católica de Nuestra Señora de Asunción, Asunción, Paraguay 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, Hospital Clínico Dr. Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.

Objective: To evaluate depressive symptoms and related factors among mid-aged women using the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD-10).

Methods: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study in which women aged 40 to 65 from various South American countries were surveyed with the CESD-10 and a general questionnaire containing personal and partner data.

Results: In all, 864 women were interviewed from Colombia (Afro-Colombian, n = 215), Ecuador (Mestizo, n = 202), Perú (Quechua at high altitude, n = 231), and Paraguay (Mestizo, n = 216). Mean age of the whole sample was 49.1 ± 6.0 years. Although the rate of postmenopausal status was similar among studied sites, differences were observed in relation to age, parity, hormone therapy use, hot flush rate, sedentary lifestyle, chronic medical conditions, habits, and partner aspects. Median total CESD-10 score for all sites was 7.0, with a 36.0% (n = 311) having scores equal to 10 or more (suggestive of depressed mood). Higher scores were observed for Afro-Colombian and Quechua women, and also for postmenopausal and perimenopausal ones. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that depressed mood (higher CESD-10 total scores) was significantly associated with ethnicity (Afro-Colombian), hot flush severity, hormone therapy use, sedentary lifestyle, postmenopause, perceived unhealthy status, and lower education. Higher monthly coital frequency and having a healthy partner without premature ejaculation was related to lower scores, hence less depressed mood.

Conclusion: In this mid-aged female South American sample, depressive symptoms correlated to menopausal status and related aspects, ethnicity, and personal and partner issues. All these features require further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0000000000000924DOI Listing
November 2017

Reaction of azides and enolisable aldehydes under the catalysis of organic bases and Cinchona based quaternary ammonium salts.

Org Biomol Chem 2017 Jun;15(24):5227-5235

Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology (CSCB), Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, 123 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

Herein we report a two-step sequence for the preparation of amides starting from azides and enolisable aldehydes. The reaction proceeded via the formation of triazoline intermediates that were converted into amides via Lewis acid catalysis. Preliminary studies on the preparation of triazolines under chiral phase transfer catalysis are also presented, demonstrating that enantioenriched amides could be prepared from achiral aldehydes in moderate to low enantioselectivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c7ob00799jDOI Listing
June 2017

Impaired downregulation of visual cortex during auditory processing is associated with autism symptomatology in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism Res 2017 Jan 20;10(1):130-143. Epub 2016 May 20.

Brain Development Imaging Laboratory, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, 6363 Alvarado CT Suite #200, San Diego, California.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are pervasive developmental disorders characterized by impairments in language development and social interaction, along with restricted and stereotyped behaviors. These behaviors often include atypical responses to sensory stimuli; some children with ASD are easily overwhelmed by sensory stimuli, while others may seem unaware of their environment. Vision and audition are two sensory modalities important for social interactions and language, and are differentially affected in ASD. In the present study, 16 children and adolescents with ASD and 16 typically developing (TD) participants matched for age, gender, nonverbal IQ, and handedness were tested using a mixed event-related/blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm to examine basic perceptual processes that may form the foundation for later-developing cognitive abilities. Auditory (high or low pitch) and visual conditions (dot located high or low in the display) were presented, and participants indicated whether the stimuli were "high" or "low." Results for the auditory condition showed downregulated activity of the visual cortex in the TD group, but upregulation in the ASD group. This atypical activity in visual cortex was associated with autism symptomatology. These findings suggest atypical crossmodal (auditory-visual) modulation linked to sociocommunicative deficits in ASD, in agreement with the general hypothesis of low-level sensorimotor impairments affecting core symptomatology. Autism Res 2017, 10: 130-143. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.1636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5892834PMC
January 2017

Sensory Symptoms and Processing of Nonverbal Auditory and Visual Stimuli in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

J Autism Dev Disord 2016 May;46(5):1590-601

Brain Development Imaging Lab, Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.

Atypical sensory responses are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While evidence suggests impaired auditory-visual integration for verbal information, findings for nonverbal stimuli are inconsistent. We tested for sensory symptoms in children with ASD (using the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile) and examined unisensory and bisensory processing with a nonverbal auditory-visual paradigm, for which neurotypical adults show bisensory facilitation. ASD participants reported more atypical sensory symptoms overall, most prominently in the auditory modality. On the experimental task, reduced response times for bisensory compared to unisensory trials were seen in both ASD and control groups, but neither group showed significant race model violation (evidence of intermodal integration). Findings do not support impaired bisensory processing for simple nonverbal stimuli in high-functioning children with ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2367-zDOI Listing
May 2016

Toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord in an immunocompromised patient: case report and review of the literature.

Colomb Med (Cali) 2013 Oct 31;44(4):232-5. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Universidad del Valle. Hospital Universitario del Valle. Department of Internal Medicine. Cali, Colombia.

We, herein, describe an HIV-positive patient with toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord. We also carried out a comprehensive literature review of this topic, with emphasis on the diagnostic tools and therapeutic approach.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4001992PMC
October 2013

High resolution clear native electrophoresis is a good alternative to blue native electrophoresis for the characterization of the Escherichia coli membrane complexes.

J Microbiol Methods 2014 Jul 15;102:45-54. Epub 2014 May 15.

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Campus Vida, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Electronic address:

Blue native electrophoresis (BNE) has become the most popular method for the global analysis of membrane protein complexes. Although it has been shown to be very useful for that purpose, it can produce the dissociation of complexes with weak interactions and, due to the use of Coomassie Brilliant Blue, does not allow the subsequent application of fluorimetric and/or enzymatic techniques. Recently, we have successfully used the high resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) for the analysis of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane porin complexes. The aim of this study was to determine the composition of the complexome of the Escherichia coli envelope by using hrCNE and to compare our results with those previously obtained using BNE. The bidimensional electrophoresis approaches used, hrCN/hrCNE and hrCN/SDS-PAGE, coupled to mass spectrometry allowed a detailed analysis of the complexome of E. coli membranes. For the first time, the three subunits of the formate dehydrogenase FDH-O were identified forming a single complex and hrCNE also allowed the identification of both the HflK and HflC proteins as components of the HflA complex. This technique also allowed us to suggest a relationship between OmpF and DLDH and, although OmpA is considered to be monomeric in vivo, we found this protein structured as homodimers. Thus hrCNE provides a good tool for future analyses of bacterial membrane proteins and complexes and is an important alternative to the commonly used BNE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2014.05.003DOI Listing
July 2014

Errors in the treatment of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and their impact on maternal mortality.

Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2013 Apr 12;121(1):78-81. Epub 2013 Jan 12.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia.

Objective: To describe the patients' characteristics and the factors that contributed to the maternal deaths associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy that occurred in the department of Antioquia, Colombia, from 2004 through 2011.

Methods: A committee of experts conducted a retrospective descriptive study to analyze the information obtained from both mandatory reports of health facilities to the Public Health Surveillance System and interviews with family members.

Results: From 2004 through 2011, there were 720 170 births and 389 maternal deaths in the Department of Antioquia, and 70 of the deaths were due to hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. The factors that most contributed to the deaths were a lack of emergency administration of antihypertensive drugs (64.6%); the inadequate administration of antihypertensive drugs (58.8%); retaining the patient at a health facility ill equipped to treat her appropriately for her clinical state (54.7%); untimely referral or inadequate conditions for transfer (50.8%); and an error in classifying the severity of the disorder, which prevented appropriate management (49.1%).

Conclusion: A substandard quality of care was the determining factor in the deaths of women who presented with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2012.10.031DOI Listing
April 2013

Study of the stability of proteoliposomes as vehicles for vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis based on recombinant porin complexes.

Int J Pharm 2013 Feb 7;443(1-2):1-8. Epub 2013 Jan 7.

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Although effective against epidemic serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis strains, vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles continue to present important limitations, and great efforts are currently being focused in the development of a variety of new vaccine candidates and in the reformulation of currently existing ones. In this work, three N. meningitidis proteins, the PorA and PorB porins and the RmpM protein, were cloned, purified and incorporated into liposomes to build defined systems. The ability of proteoliposomes to allow the refolding porin complexes, and their stability during storage at 4°C and after lyophilization in presence of two cryoprotection agents, glucose and trehalose, were evaluated. This approach allowed to mimic the porin complexes present in natural OMVs, reducing the content of hypervariable protein PorA. During storage at 4°C, our systems showed some changes in the morphology and aggregation after three months, while after lyophilization the systems maintained their properties during the whole nine months of storage checked, with glucose allowing the best preservation of the antigenic properties of the proteins in the proteoliposomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2012.12.046DOI Listing
February 2013

High resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) allows a detailed analysis of the heterotrimeric structure of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis porins inserted into liposomes.

J Proteome Res 2013 Feb 9;12(2):777-84. Epub 2013 Jan 9.

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Campus Sur, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Three recombinant proteins of Neisseria meningitidis, rPorB, rPorA, and rRmpM, were purified and incorporated into liposomes prepared by dialysis-extrusion. The protein complexes formed using different combinations of recombinant proteins were studied by high resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) and 2-D hrCNE/SDS-PAGE, analyzing the influence of the stoichiometry of the two porins in the formation of complexes and comparing them with native porin complexes present in OMVs from five different N. meningitidis strains. Insertion of the recombinant proteins into liposomes allowed a complete refolding of porin complexes, and the electrophoretic analyses showed that, when the three recombinant proteins are present, the pattern of porin complexes obtained is similar to that observed in native OMVs. We could show homocomplexes of each individual porin and PorA/PorB, RmpM/PorB, and PorA/PorB/RmpM heterocomplexes. Our results suggest that RmpM binds only to PorB, confirm the trimeric structure of N. meningitidis pores, and demonstrate that insertion into liposomes restores the native structure of porin complexes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr3008573DOI Listing
February 2013

Immune-recovery posterior uveitis associated with inactive isolated toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus.

Retin Cases Brief Rep 2012 ;6(1):105-8

From the *Ophthalmology Department, †AIDS Unit, and ‡IrsiCaixa Laboratory, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Purpose: To report a case of severe panuveitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus that developed after inactivation of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. The patient also developed cerebral toxoplasmosis.

Methods: A patient with human immunodeficiency virus who developed immune-recovery posterior uveitis in the context of inactive toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis underwent complete ophthalmologic evaluation, polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous humor, diagnostic vitrectomy, and cerebral ancillary testing.

Results: Polymerase chain reaction-confirmed toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis healed with appropriate treatment, but 2 months later coinciding with systemic immune restoration, the brain lesions worsened and immune-recovery panuveitis caused decreased visual acuity. Diagnostic vitrectomy confirmed only inflammatory cells.

Conclusion: Immune-recovery panuveitis caused by cytomegalovirus retinitis is well documented, but we found only one published case caused by toxoplasma. Immune-recovery panuveitis should not be ruled out despite the absence of previous cytomegalovirus retinitis. A patient with human immunodeficiency virus who has had an intraocular opportunistic infection, despite resolution, must be followed-up by an ophthalmologist in collaboration with an infectious disease specialist to prevent blindness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ICB.0b013e31820a2ea1DOI Listing
November 2014

Soluble fibers and resistant starch ameliorate disease activity in interleukin-10-deficient mice with inflammatory bowel disease.

J Nutr 2011 Jul 11;141(7):1318-25. Epub 2011 May 11.

Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

Our goal in this study was to determine the potential for dietary fibers to prevent gut inflammation in IL-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice (n = 90) and IL-10(-/-) mice (n = 185) were assigned to a control diet or diets supplemented with PROMITOR soluble corn fiber (SCF), STA-LITE III polydextrose (PDX), Biogum (BG), Pullulan (PI-20), PROMITOR resistant starch-75 (RS-75), SCF&BG, RS-75&BG, and inulin (4 g fiber/100 g diet). On d 47, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were macroscopically and histologically evaluated. The spleen and Peyer's patches (PP) were collected for isolating mononuclear cells and measuring the percentages of regulatory T cells (Treg) and cytokines produced by CD4(+) T cells (i.e. IFNγ and IL-10). Dietary supplementation with RS-75, SCF, RS-75&BG, and inulin ameliorated disease activity on d 47. Dietary RS-75 and inulin supplementation decreased ileal and colonic inflammatory lesions. RS-75, SCF, and inulin decreased IFNγ production by effector CD4(+) T cells from PP and RS-75 increased the IL-10-expressing cells in spleen of WT mice. Dietary SCF, PDX, BG, PI-20, and RS-75 upregulated colonic PPARγ expression in WT mice and SCF upregulated Supressor of cytokine signaling 3 in IL-10(-/-) mice. These data suggest that soluble fibers and resistant starch influence Treg cells, IFNγ, and colonic PPARγ expression to suppress gut inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.139022DOI Listing
July 2011

Fever and bleeding in a newborn baby.

Pediatr Infect Dis J 2010 Dec;29(12):1153-8

Fundacion INFANT, Gavilán 94, 1406 Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181e50e24DOI Listing
December 2010

Identification of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle complexes using 2-D high resolution clear native/SDS-PAGE.

J Proteome Res 2010 Jan;9(1):611-9

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Campus Sur, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

The identification and characterization of meningococcal outer membrane vesicle complexes can be important for gaining an in-depth understaining of their structure and functionality. Analysis of the vesicle complexome by 'traditional' 2-D analysis, in which isoelectrofocusing is used for separation in the first dimension, is hampered by the high hydrophobicity and extreme isoelectric points of many relevant proteins. Analysis of the meningococcal outer membrane vesicle complexome using Blue Native (nondenaturing) electrophoresis instead of isoelectrofocusing in the first dimension showed several porin complexes, but their composition could not be clearly resolved after separation by SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. In this work, using a recently described native separation technique -high resolution Clear Native Electrophoresis-and different bidimensional approaches, we were able to demonstrate the presence of relevant outer membrane complexes which could be resolved with a higher resolution than in previous analysis. The most relevant were nine porin complexes formed by different combinations of the meningococcal PorA, PorB and RmpM proteins, and comparison with the complexes formed in specific knockout mutants allowed us to infer the relevance of each porin in the formation of each complex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr9006409DOI Listing
January 2010
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