Publications by authors named "Sanaz Eftekhari"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Asthma care during COVID-19: differences in attitudes and expectations between physicians and patients.

J Asthma 2021 Feb 24:1-7. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore differences in attitudes, behaviors and expectations related to COVID-19 between physicians and patients with asthma.

Methods: An anonymous survey was distributed through email and social media to adult patients with asthma during a three-week period in April-May 2020. A separate survey was sent to physicians. The surveys asked about demographic information, specific challenges and concerns due to COVID-19, and attitudes/behaviors during this time.

Results: A total of 1171 patients and 225 physicians completed the surveys. Overall, patients with asthma and physicians had large differences in expectations related to COVID-19. Patients were more likely than physicians to believe that individuals with asthma are at a higher risk to get COVID-19 (37.5% vs. 12.0%,  < 0.001), have increased anxiety due to COVID-19 (79.6% vs 70.0%,  = 0.002), and should not go to work (62.7% vs 11.9%,  < 0.001). Neither patients nor physicians felt confident they could distinguish COVID-19 symptoms from asthma (61.2% and 74.5% did not feel confident, respectively). Patients with severe asthma were significantly more impacted by the pandemic (e.g., became unemployed [OR 2.15], had difficulty getting asthma medications [OR 2.37]) compared to those with nonsevere asthma.

Conclusion: Patients with asthma and their physicians have markedly different attitudes and opinions regarding care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such differences have important implications when providing patient-centered care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2021.1887214DOI Listing
February 2021

Food allergy treatment value: Child caregiver and patient perspectives.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2021 Feb 5. Epub 2021 Feb 5.

Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Background: Food allergy is a major health problem that significantly impacts quality of life (QoL). There is growing focus to evaluate food allergy-related QoL and treatment options' value beyond the clinical effectiveness perspective by engaging patients and caregivers. We aimed to identify and prioritize outcomes important to food allergy parents of children and patients allergic to milk, egg, and/or peanut, to guide comparative effectiveness research (CER) that focuses on evaluating food allergy treatment decisions.

Methods: We conducted a modified 3-round Delphi study to identify and derive consensus on priority treatment outcomes for parents of children and adult patients with diagnosed allergies to at least one of three major allergenic foods (milk, egg, and peanut) from across the United States.

Results: Round 1 yielded 44 statements for round 2, and 39 statements reached the agreement level for round 3 ranking. Statements were organized under 4 sections: 1) food allergy problems, 2) treatment experiences, 3) important treatment outcomes, and 4) value of different treatment options.

Conclusion: Food allergy parents and patients face several social, psychological, medical, healthcare, financial, food selection, and awareness challenges. The areas of consensus on important treatment outcomes revealed shared priority for reducing the risk of potentially fatal allergic reactions and having reliable treatments. The most valued treatment options reflect hope for permanent cure and fear of serious allergic reactions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.13464DOI Listing
February 2021

Caregiver-Reported Presentation of Severe Food-Induced Allergic Reactions in Infants and Toddlers.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 Jan 18;9(1):311-320.e2. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Background: Recognizing anaphylaxis in infants and toddlers can be challenging for health care providers and caregivers, and current diagnostic criteria and anaphylaxis action plans do not specifically address this younger population.

Objective: To describe symptoms and signs observed by primary caregivers of infants and toddlers during severe food-induced allergic reactions.

Methods: We conducted a national online survey among primary caregivers of children who experienced a severe food-induced allergic reaction when less than 36 months of age. Respondents who were present during the child's most severe reaction were asked to report symptoms and signs observed. The survey asked about infant- and toddler-specific symptoms and signs in lay language for caregivers. Data were compared with patient-reported data from past studies to identify distinct patterns among the younger population.

Results: The survey was completed for 374 children (193 infants, 181 toddlers). The most common symptoms and signs reported were skin reactions (90%), facial and extremity swelling (59%), gastrointestinal issues (51%), and coughing/wheezing (45%). Infants (aged <12 months) more frequently experienced skin reactions, skin mottling, and ear pulling/scratching or putting fingers in ears, as compared with toddlers (aged 12-35 months). Toddlers experienced throat itching and coughing/wheezing more frequently than infants.

Conclusions: Anaphylaxis presentation demonstrates similarities and differences in infants and toddlers. Modifying the terminology used in the current criteria allowed for reporting of symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis that are more common in infants and toddlers. Diagnostic criteria, clinical guidelines, and anaphylaxis action plans may be enhanced to address this young, often nonverbal, population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.11.005DOI Listing
January 2021

Asthma Disparities During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Survey of Patients and Physicians.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2020 Nov - Dec;8(10):3371-3377.e1. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Asthma and Allergy Wellness Center, St Charles, Ill.

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demonstrated significantly worse outcomes for minority (black and Hispanic) individuals. Understanding the reasons for COVID-19-related disparities among patients with asthma has important public health implications.

Objective: To determine factors contributing to health disparities in those with asthma during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods: An anonymous survey was sent through social media to adult patients with asthma, and a separate survey was sent to physicians who provide asthma care. The patient survey addressed demographic information including socioeconomic status, asthma control, and attitudes/health behaviors during COVID-19.

Results: A total of 1171 patients (10.1% minority individuals) and 225 physicians completed the survey. Minority patients were more likely to have been affected by COVID-19 (eg, became unemployed, lived in a community with high COVID-19 cases). They had worse asthma control (increased emergency visits for asthma, lower Asthma Control Test score), were more likely to live in urban areas, and had a lower household income. Initial differences in attitudes and health behaviors disappeared after controlling for baseline demographic features. Institutional racism was demonstrated by findings that minority individuals were less likely to have a primary care physician, had more trouble affording asthma medications due to COVID-19, and were more likely to have lost health insurance because of COVID-19, and that 25% of physicians found it more challenging to care for black individuals with asthma during COVID-19.

Conclusions: Differences in socioeconomic status and the effects of institutional racism, but not health behaviors, sources of information, or attitudes, are playing a role in disparities seen for patients with asthma during COVID-19.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.09.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7836887PMC
November 2020

Perspectives on Living with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria: From Onset through Diagnosis and Disease Management in the US.

Acta Derm Venereol 2019 Nov;99(12):1091-1098

Allergy and Ashtma Care of Long Island, , 11570 Rockville Centre, USA.

Chronic spontaneous urticaria is challenging to manage and substantially affects quality of life. This US, non-interventional qualitative study examined patients' clinical journeys and emotional burden from symptom onset through disease management. Chronic spontaneous urticaria patients participated in interviews and completed diaries focusing on disease and treatment history/perspectives, impact on personal/family life, and relationships with physicians/other healthcare providers. Physicians were interviewed about their views on disease management and patient care. Twenty-five patients, previously or currently receiving chronic spontaneous urticaria treatment(s), and 12 physicians participated. Key stages following symptom onset were identified: Crisis (associated with feelings of torment/disorientation/shock); Searching for answers (puzzlement/frustration/anxiety); Diagnosis (relief/satisfaction/fear/isolation); and Disease management (frustration/hope/powerlessness). Findings revealed patients' perceptions and experiences of chronic spontaneous urticaria, including living with a 'skinemy', experiencing their 'own personal hell' and feeling 'like an experiment'. Awareness of unmet needs in patient care/management identified in this study may ultimately improve patient support and enhance physicians' understanding of disease burden.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3282DOI Listing
November 2019

Enhanced Glutamatergic Currents at Birth in Shank3 KO Mice.

Neural Plast 2019 3;2019:2382639. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Department of Neurobiology, Mediterranean Institute of Neurobiology (INMED), Aix-Marseille University, INSERM U1249, 13273 Marseille Cedex 09, France.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders induced by genetic and environmental factors. In our recent studies, we showed that the GABA developmental shifts during delivery and the second postnatal week are abolished in two rodent models of ASD. Maternal treatment around birth with bumetanide restored the GABA developmental sequence and attenuated the autism pathogenesis in offspring. Clinical trials conducted in parallel confirmed the usefulness of bumetanide treatment to attenuate the symptoms in children with ASD. Collectively, these observations suggest that an alteration of the GABA developmental sequence is a hallmark of ASD. Here, we investigated whether similar alterations occur in the Shank3 mouse model of ASD. We report that in CA3 pyramidal neurons, the driving force and inhibitory action of GABA are not different in naïve and Shank3-mutant age-matched animals at birth and during the second postnatal week. In contrast, the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents is already enhanced at birth and persists through postnatal day 15. Therefore, in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Shank3-mutant mice, glutamatergic but not GABAergic activity is affected at early developmental stages, hence reflecting the heterogeneity of mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ASD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/2382639DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6636579PMC
July 2020

Effect of bumetanide, a selective NKCC1 inhibitor, on hallucinations of schizophrenic patients; a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

Schizophr Res 2017 06 9;184:145-146. Epub 2016 Dec 9.

Division of Neuroscience, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2016.12.002DOI Listing
June 2017

Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modification of Epileptiform Burst Discharges in a Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Model.

Basic Clin Neurosci 2016 Apr;7(2):115-20

Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.; Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with potent anti-inflammatory property, which has been considered as an essential risk factor in the inflammatory process of Ischemic Stroke (IS), by involving in the pathophysiological progression of hypertension, atherosclerosis, and lipid metabolisms. -509C/T TGF-β1 gene polymorphism has been found to be associated with the risk of IS. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a relatively comprehensive account of the relation between -509C/T gene polymorphisms of TGF-β1 and susceptibility to IS.

Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham (receiving phosphate buffered saline within dorsal hippocampus), pilocarpine (epileptic model of TLE), single injection BDNF (epileptic rats which received single high dose of BDBF within dorsal hippocampus), and multiple injections BDNF (epileptic rats which received BDNF in days 10, 11, 12, and 13 after induction of TLE) groups. Their electrocorticogram was recorded and amplitude, frequency, and duration of spikes were evaluated.

Results: Amplitude and frequency of epileptiform burst discharges were significantly decreased in animals treated with BDNF compared to pilocarpine group.

Conclusion: Our findings suggested that BDNF may modulate the epileptic activity in the animal model of TLE. In addition, it may have therapeutic effect for epilepsy. More studies are necessary to clarify the exact mechanisms of BDNF effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15412/J.BCN.03070205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4892316PMC
April 2016

Fluoxetin upregulates connexin 43 expression in astrocyte.

Basic Clin Neurosci 2014 ;5(1):74-9

Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran ; Division of Neuroscience, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran ; Neuroscience Institute, Brain and Spinal cord Injury Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Recent studies have shown that astrocytes play major roles in normal and disease condition of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis (MS). Molecular target therapy studies in MS have revealed that connexin-43 (Cx43) and Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) contents of astrocytes undergo expression alteration. Fluoxetine had some effects in MS patients unrelated to its known antidepressant effects. Some of fluoxetine effects were attributed to its capability of cAMP signaling pathway stimulation. This study aimed to investigate possible acute effects of fluoxetine on Cx43 and AQP4 expression in astrocyte.

Methods: Astrocytoma cells were treated for 24 hours with fluoxetine (10 and 20 µg/ml) with or without adenyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition. Cx43 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and AQP4 expression at mRNA level were evaluated.

Results: Acquired results showed that fluoxetine with and without AC and PKA inhibition resulted in Cx43 up-regulation both in mRNA and protein levels, whereas AQP4 expression have not changed.

Discussion: In conclusion, data showed that fluoxetine alone and in the absence of serotonin acutely up-regulated Cx43 expression in astrocytes that can be assumed in molecular target therapy of MS patients. It seems that cAMP involvement in fluoxetine effects need more researches.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202606PMC
December 2014

Response to Comment on "Oxytocin-mediated GABA inhibition during delivery attenuates autism pathogenesis in rodent offspring".

Science 2014 Oct;346(6206):176

Mediterranean Institute of Neurobiology (INMED), U901, INSERM, Marseille, France. UMR 901, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. Neurochlore, Campus Scientifique de Luminy, 163 Route de Luminy, Marseille, France.

Bambini-Junior et al. questioned whether our treatment in two rodent models of autism has a long-lasting effect into adulthood. In response, we show that bumetanide treatment around delivery attenuates autistic behavioral features in adult offspring. Therefore, the polarity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) actions during delivery exerts long-lasting priming actions after birth.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256009DOI Listing
October 2014

BDNF modifies hippocampal KCC2 and NKCC1 expression in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars) 2014 ;74(3):276-87

Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine,

Excitatory GABA actions, induced by altered expression of chloride transporters (KCC2/NKCC1), can contribute to seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, we evaluated whether BDNF administration can affect KCC2/NKCC1 expression, ictogenesis and behavioral alterations in this paradigm. Status epilepticus was induced in male rats with pilocarpine, followed by a treatment of either a single high dose or multiple injections of BDNF during the latent phase of temporal lobe epilepsy. Chloride transporters expression, spontaneous recurrent seizures, and hyperexcitability post-seizural behaviors were evaluated after treatment. NKCC1 protein expression was markedly upregulated, whereas that of KCC2 was significantly downregulated in epileptic hippocampi compared to intact controls. Application of BDNF (both single high dose and multiple injections) increased KCC2 expression in epileptic hippocampi, while NKCC1 expression was downregulated exclusively by the single high dose injection of BDNF. Development of spontaneous recurrent seizures was delayed but not prevented by the treatment, and hyperexcitability behaviors were ameliorated for a short period of time. To prevent GABA-A mediated depolarization and design appropriate treatment strategies for temporal lobe epilepsy, chloride transporters can be considered as a target. Future studies are warranted to investigate any possible therapeutic effects of BDNF via altering chloride transporters expression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2015

Selective β2 adrenergic agonist increases Cx43 and miR-451 expression via cAMP-Epac.

Mol Med Rep 2014 Jun 8;9(6):2405-10. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417755469, Iran.

It has been demonstrated that connexin 43 (Cx43) and microRNAs have significant roles in glioma. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is suggested to be a regulator of connexins and microRNAs. However, it remains elusive whether cAMP and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac2), have a regulatory effect on Cx43 and microRNA-451 (miR-451) in astrocytoma cells. We treated 1321N1 astrocytoma cells with a selective β2 adrenergic agonist and a selective Epac activator with and without adenyl cyclase and protein kinase A inhibition. Cx43 and miR-451 expression were measured. Next, we evaluated the effect of miR-451 overexpression on Cx43 expression. Cell proliferation was measured using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results demonstrated that cAMP-Epac2 increased Cx43 and miR-451 expression. However, the alteration of miR-451 expression required a higher dose of drugs. Overexpression of miR-451 had no significant effect on Cx43 expression. The MTT assay showed that cAMP-Epac stimulation and miR-451 overexpression had a synergic inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. These findings may expand our understanding of the molecular biology of glioma and provide new potential therapeutic targets.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2014.2120DOI Listing
June 2014

Oxytocin-mediated GABA inhibition during delivery attenuates autism pathogenesis in rodent offspring.

Science 2014 Feb;343(6171):675-9

Mediterranean Institute of Neurobiology (INMED), U901, INSERM, Marseille, France.

We report that the oxytocin-mediated neuroprotective γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excitatory-inhibitory shift during delivery is abolished in the valproate and fragile X rodent models of autism. During delivery and subsequently, hippocampal neurons in these models have elevated intracellular chloride levels, increased excitatory GABA, enhanced glutamatergic activity, and elevated gamma oscillations. Maternal pretreatment with bumetanide restored in offspring control electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes. Conversely, blocking oxytocin signaling in naïve mothers produced offspring having electrophysiological and behavioral autistic-like features. Our results suggest a chronic deficient chloride regulation in these rodent models of autism and stress the importance of oxytocin-mediated GABAergic inhibition during the delivery process. Our data validate the amelioration observed with bumetanide and oxytocin and point to common pathways in a drug-induced and a genetic rodent model of autism.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1247190DOI Listing
February 2014

The effect of tiagabine on physical development and neurological reflexes and their relationship with the γ-aminobutyric acid switch in the rat cerebral cortex during developmental stages.

Behav Pharmacol 2013 Oct;24(7):561-8

Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

In the present study, we focused on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling through the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (GAT) in the developing rat cerebral cortex. Tiagabine was used as a GAT inhibitor. The offspring received injections from birth until postnatal day 21 intraperitoneally. Physical development and neurological reflexes were assessed daily. Tiagabine did not influence body weight, the onset and completion of incisor eruption, or the time to appearance of cliff avoidance. However, the onset and completion of eye opening, ear unfolding, and fur growth occurred earlier in treated pups. Further, the slanted board test and righting reflex showed accelerated development (i.e. decreased time to criterion) when compared with the control group. To determine whether the obtained effects are related to the GABA switch, we examined the protein and mRNA expression of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2 using western blotting and RT-PCR, respectively. Downregulation of KCC2 mRNA and protein levels was observed when GAT was inhibited. The results may indicate a role of GAT in the neurobehavioral changes that accompany the developmental switch in GABA function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FBP.0b013e328365422fDOI Listing
October 2013

Cell therapy in spinal cord injury: a mini- reivew.

Basic Clin Neurosci 2013 ;4(2):172-6

Division of Neuroscience, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating disease which leads to progressive functional damages. Because of limited axonal regeneration in the central nervous system, there is no or little recovery expected in the patients. Different cellular and molecular approaches were investigated in SCI animal models. Cellular transplantation of stem cells can potentially replace damaged tissue and provide a suitable microenvironment for axons to regenerate. Here, we reviewed the last approaches applied by our colleagues and others in order to improve axonal regeneration following SCI. We used different types of stem cells via different methods. First, fetal olfactory mucosa, schwann, and bone marrow stromal cells were transplanted into the injury sites in SCI models. In later studies, was applied simultaneous transplantation of stem cells with chondroitinase ABC in SCI models with the aid of nanoparticles. Using these approaches, considerable functional recovery was observed. However, considering some challenges in stem cell therapy such as rejection, infection, and development of a new cancer, our more recent strategy was application of cytokines. We observed a significant improvement in motor function of rats when stromal derived factor-1 was used to attract innate stem cells to the injury site. In conclusion, it seems that co-transplantation of different cells accompanies with other factors like enzymes and growth factors via new delivery systems may yield better results in SCI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202537PMC
October 2014

Bumetanide reduces seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

Epilepsia 2013 Jan 12;54(1):e9-12. Epub 2012 Oct 12.

Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Alterations in the balance of K-Na-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) and Na-Cl cotransporter (KCC2) activity may cause depolarizing effect of γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA), and contribute to epileptogenesis in human temporal lobe epilepsy. NKCC1 facilitates accumulation of chloride inside neurons and favors depolarizing responses to GABA. In the current pilot study we provide the first documented look at efficacy of bumetanide, a specific NKCC1 antagonist, on reduction of seizure frequency in adult patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. According to our results, seizure frequency was reduced considerably in these patients. Furthermore, epileptiform discharges decreased in two of our patients. If the efficacy of bumetanide is proven in large scale studies, it can be used as a supplemental therapy in temporal lobe epilepsy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03654.xDOI Listing
January 2013

The most important metabolic risk factors in recurrent urinary stone formers.

Urol J 2011 ;8(2):99-106

Shahid Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: To evaluate different urinary factors contributing to idiopathic calcium stone disease for determining appropriate medical treatments.

Materials And Methods: Two 24-hour urine samples were collected from 106 male recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers and another 109 randomly selected men as the control group matching for age.

Results: Cases had significantly higher mean urine oxalate, calcium, uric acid, and chloride in comparison with the healthy controls (P < .001). After necessary adjustment, only mean urine levels of oxalate and uric acid were higher in stone formers than those in controls. The mean value of supersaturation for calcium oxalate was significantly higher in patients than the controls (P = .001); whereas supersaturation for calcium phosphate and uric acid did not reach statistical significance (P = .675 and P = .675, respectively). Hyperoxaluria and hypercalciuria were among the most frequent abnormalities. After categorizing urine parameter values into four quartiles, the risk of stone formation was found to increase as the urine calcium, oxalate, uric acid, chloride, and citrate rise. In contrast, the risk of stone formation decreased with the increase of urine potassium.

Conclusion: Oxalate seems to play the most important role as urinary stone risk factor in our population followed by calcium and uric acid. In addition to the risk factors, it seems that supersaturation as the sum of all risk factors probably has a high predictive value.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2011