Publications by authors named "Samyra Maria Dos Santos Nassif Lacerda"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

GATA-1 mutation alters the spermatogonial phase and steroidogenesis in adult mouse testis.

Mol Cell Endocrinol 2022 02 26;542:111519. Epub 2021 Nov 26.

Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Morphology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address:

GATA-1 is a transcription factor from the GATA family, which features zinc fingers for DNA binding. This protein was initially identified as a crucial regulator of blood cell differentiation, but it is currently known that the Gata-1 gene expression is not limited to this system. Although the testis is also a site of significant GATA-1 expression, its role in testicular cells remains considerably unexplored. In the present study, we evaluated the testicular morphophysiology of adult ΔdblGATA mice with a mutation in the GATA-1 protein. Regarding testicular histology, GATA-1 mutant mice exhibited few changes in the seminiferous tubules, particularly in germ cells. A high proportion of differentiated spermatogonia, an increased number of apoptotic pre-leptotene spermatocytes (Caspase-3-positive), and a high frequency of sperm head defects were observed in ΔdblGATA mice. The main differences were observed in the intertubular compartment, as ΔdblGATA mice showed several morphofunctional changes in Leydig cells. Reduced volume, increased number and down-regulation of steroidogenic enzymes were observed in ΔdblGATA Leydig cells. Moreover, the mutant animal showed lower serum testosterone concentration and high LH levels. These results are consistent with the phenotypic and biometric data of mutant mice, i.e., shorter anogenital index and reduced accessory sexual gland weight. In conclusion, our findings suggest that GATA-1 protein is an important factor for germ cell differentiation as well as for the steroidogenic activity in the testis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mce.2021.111519DOI Listing
February 2022

Production of donor-derived eggs after ovarian germ cell transplantation into the gonads of adult, germ cell-less, triploid hybrid fish†.

Biol Reprod 2020 12;103(6):1289-1299

Noto Center for Fisheries Science and Technology, Faculty of Biological Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan.

In animals, spermatogonial transplantation in sterile adult males is widely developed; however, despite its utility, ovarian germ cell transplantation is not well developed. We previously showed that the interspecific hybrid offspring of sciaenid was a suitable model for germ cell transplantation studies as they have germ cell-less gonads. However, all these gonads have testis-like characteristics. Here, we tested whether triploidization in hybrid embryos could result in germ cell-less ovary development. Gonadal structure dimorphism and sex-specific gene expression patterns were examined in 6-month-old triploid hybrids (3nHybs). Thirty-one percent of 3nHybs had germ cell-less gonads with an ovarian cavity. cyp19a1a and foxl2, ovarian differentiation-related genes, were expressed in these gonads, whereas dmrt1 and vasa were not expressed, suggesting ovary-like germ cell-less gonad development. Some (26%) 3nHybs had testis-like germ cell-less gonads. Ovarian germ cells collected from homozygous green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic blue drum (BD) (Nibea mitsukurii) were transplanted into 6-month-old 3nHybs gonads via the urogenital papilla or oviduct. After 9 months, the recipients were crossed with wild type BD. Among the six 3nHyb recipients that survived, one female and one male produced fertile eggs and motile sperm carrying gfp-specific DNA sequences. Progeny tests revealed that all F1 offspring possessed gfp-specific DNA sequences, suggesting that these recipients produced only donor-derived eggs or sperm. Histological observation confirmed donor-derived gametogenesis in the 3nHyb recipients' gonads. Overall, triploidization reduces male-biased sex differentiation in germ cell-less gonads. We report, for the first time, donor-derived egg production in an animal via direct ovarian germ cell transplantation into a germ cell-less ovary.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolre/ioaa168DOI Listing
December 2020

Germ cell-less hybrid fish: ideal recipient for spermatogonial transplantation for the rapid production of donor-derived sperm†.

Biol Reprod 2019 08;101(2):492-500

Division of Fisheries Resource Sciences, Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University, Shimoarata 4-50-20, Kagoshima City, Japan.

An interspecific hybrid marine fish that developed a testis-like gonad without any germ cells, i.e., a germ cell-less gonad, was produced by hybridizing a female blue drum Nibea mitsukurii with a male white croaker Pennahia argentata. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of the germ cell-less fish as a recipient by transplanting donor testicular cells directly into the gonads through the urogenital papilla. The donor testicular cells were collected from hemizygous transgenic, green fluorescent protein (gfp) (+/-) blue drum, and transplanted into the germ cell-less gonads of the 6-month-old adult hybrid croakers. Fluorescent and histological observations showed the colonization, proliferation, and differentiation of transplanted spermatogonial cells in the gonads of hybrid croakers. The earliest production of spermatozoa in a hybrid recipient was observed at 7 weeks post-transplantation (pt), and 10% of the transplanted recipients produced donor-derived gfp-positive spermatozoa by 25 weeks pt. Sperm from the hybrid recipients were used to fertilize eggs from wild-type blue drums, and approximately 50% of the resulting offspring were gfp-positive, suggesting that all offspring originated from donor-derived sperm that were produced in the transplanted gfp (+/-) germ cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful spermatogonial transplantation using a germ cell-less adult fish as a recipient. This transplantation system has considerable advantages, such as the use of comparatively simple equipment and procedures, and rapid generation of donor-derived spermatogenesis and offspring, and presents numerous applications in commercial aquaculture.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolre/ioz045DOI Listing
August 2019

Gene delivery to Nile tilapia cells for transgenesis and the role of PI3K-c2α in angiogenesis.

Sci Rep 2017 03 20;7:44317. Epub 2017 Mar 20.

Cell Signaling &Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry &Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Microinjection is commonly performed to achieve fish transgenesis; however, due to difficulties associated with this technique, new strategies are being developed. Here we evaluate the potential of lentiviral particles to genetically modify Nile tilapia cells to achieve transgenesis using three different approaches: spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) genetic modification and transplantation (SC), in vivo transduction of gametes (GT), and fertilised egg transduction (ET). The SC protocol using larvae generates animals with sustained production of modified sperm (80% of animals with 77% maximum sperm fluorescence [MSF]), but is a time-consuming protocol (sexual maturity in Nile tilapia is achieved at 6 months of age). GT is a faster technique, but the modified gamete production is temporary (70% of animals with 52% MSF). ET is an easier way to obtain mosaic transgenic animals compared to microinjection of eggs, but non-site-directed integration in the fish genome can be a problem. In this study, PI3Kc2α gene disruption impaired development during the embryo stage and caused premature death. The manipulator should choose a technique based on the time available for transgenic obtainment and if this generation is required to be continuous or not.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep44317DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5357942PMC
March 2017

Biology and identity of fish spermatogonial stem cell.

Gen Comp Endocrinol 2014 Oct 23;207:56-65. Epub 2014 Jun 23.

Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Morphology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901, Brazil. Electronic address:

Although present at relatively low number in the testis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are crucial for the establishment and maintenance of spermatogenesis in eukaryotes and, until recently, those cells were investigated in fish using morphological criteria. The isolation and characterization of these cells in fish have been so far limited by the lack of specific molecular markers, hampering the high SSCs biotechnological potential for aquaculture. However, some highly conserved vertebrate molecular markers, such as Gfra1 and Pou5f1/Oct4, are now available representing important candidates for studies evaluating the regulation of SSCs in fish and even functional investigations using germ cells transplantation. A technique already used to demonstrate that, different from mammals, fish germ stem cells (spermatogonia and oogonia) present high sexual plasticity that is determined by the somatic microenvironment. As relatively well established in mammals, and demonstrated in zebrafish and dogfish, this somatic environment is very important for the preferential location and regulation of SSCs. Importantly, a long-term in vitro culture system for SSCs has been now established for some fish species. Therefore, besides the aforementioned possibilities, such culture system would allow the development of strategies to in vitro investigate key regulatory and functional aspects of germline stem cells (ex: self-renewal and/or differentiation) or to amplify SSCs of rare, endangered, or commercially valuable fish species, representing an important tool for transgenesis and the development of new biotechnologies in fish production.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygcen.2014.06.018DOI Listing
October 2014
-->