Publications by authors named "Samuel Lienemann"

3 Publications

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Stretchable gold nanowire-based cuff electrodes for low-voltage peripheral nerve stimulation.

J Neural Eng 2021 05 25;18(4). Epub 2021 May 25.

Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.

. Electrical stimulation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can treat various diseases and disorders, including the healing process after nerve injury. A major challenge when designing electrodes for PNS stimulation is the mechanical mismatch between the nerve and the device, which can lead to non-conformal contact, tissue damage and inefficient stimulation due to current leakage. Soft and stretchable cuff electrodes promise to tackle these challenges but often have limited performance and rely on unconventional materials. The aim of this study is to develop a high performance soft and stretchable cuff electrode based on inert materials for low-voltage nerve stimulation.. We developed 50m thick stretchable cuff electrodes based on silicone rubber, gold nanowire conductors and platinum coated nanowire electrodes. The electrode performance was characterized under strain cycling to assess the durability of the electrodes. The stimulation capability of the cuff electrodes was evaluated in ansciatic nerve rat model by measuring the electromyography response to various stimulation pulses.. The stretchable cuff electrodes showed excellent stability for 50% strain cycling and one million stimulation pulses. Saturated homogeneous stimulation of the sciatic nerve was achieved at only 200 mV due to the excellent conformability of the electrodes, the low conductor resistance (0.3 Ohm sq), and the low electrode impedance.. The developed stretchable cuff electrode combines favourable mechanical properties and good electrode performance with inert and stable materials, making it ideal for low power supply applications within bioelectronic medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/abfebbDOI Listing
May 2021

Soft Electronics Based on Stretchable and Conductive Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications.

Adv Healthc Mater 2021 02 17;10(3):e2001397. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), 333 Techno jungan-dareo, Daegu, 42988, South Korea.

Research on the field of implantable electronic devices that can be directly applied in the body with various functionalities is increasingly intensifying due to its great potential for various therapeutic applications. While conventional implantable electronics generally include rigid and hard conductive materials, their surrounding biological objects are soft and dynamic. The mechanical mismatch between implanted devices and biological environments induces damages in the body especially for long-term applications. Stretchable electronics with outstanding mechanical compliance with biological objects effectively improve such limitations of existing rigid implantable electronics. In this article, the recent progress of implantable soft electronics based on various conductive nanocomposites is systematically described. In particular, representative fabrication approaches of conductive and stretchable nanocomposites for implantable soft electronics and various in vivo applications of implantable soft electronics are focused on. To conclude, challenges and perspectives of current implantable soft electronics that should be considered for further advances are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202001397DOI Listing
February 2021

Elastic conducting polymer composites in thermoelectric modules.

Nat Commun 2020 Mar 18;11(1):1424. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 601 74, Norrköping, Sweden.

The rapid growth of wearables has created a demand for lightweight, elastic and conformal energy harvesting and storage devices. The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) has shown great promise for thermoelectric generators, however, the thick layers of pristine poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) required for effective energy harvesting are too hard and brittle for seamless integration into wearables. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-elastomer composites have been developed to improve its mechanical properties, although so far without simultaneously achieving softness, high electrical conductivity, and stretchability. Here we report an aqueously processed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polyurethane-ionic liquid composite, which combines high conductivity (>140 S cm) with superior stretchability (>600%), elasticity, and low Young's modulus (<7 MPa). The outstanding performance of this organic nanocomposite is the result of favorable percolation networks on the nano- and micro-scale and the plasticizing effect of the ionic liquid. The elastic thermoelectric material is implemented in the first reported intrinsically stretchable organic thermoelectric module.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15135-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7080746PMC
March 2020