Publications by authors named "Samuel J House"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preliminary Study of Testosterone and Empathy in Determining Recidivism and Antisocial Behavior.

J Forensic Sci 2017 Sep 15;62(5):1360-1365. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Departments of Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham, Little Rock, AR, 72205.

Recidivism, repeated criminal behavior after conviction and correction of prior offenses, is a costly problem across the nation. However, the contribution of empathy in determining the risk of recidivism has received limited attention, although lack of empathy has been related to antisocial personality disorder in various studies. Studies linked testosterone to aggression, antisocial behavior, and criminality, and evidence support hormonal connections between empathy and aggression. Adult male prison inmates convicted of violent or nonviolent offenses were included in a cross-sectional study of empathy, antisocial behavior, salivary testosterone, and recidivism. Subjects underwent criminal history, Empathy Quotient, Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and salivary testosterone assays. Bivariate analyses indicated multiple correlations between variables. Multivariate modeling analyses found a significant relationship between self-reported conviction number and psychopathy scale score (p = 0.013). These preliminary results suggest avenues of investigation of factors contributing to recidivism risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.13469DOI Listing
September 2017

Perinatal Substance Abuse: At the Clinical Crossroads of Policy and Practice.

Am J Psychiatry 2016 11;173(11):1077-1080

From the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Pediatrics, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.15081104DOI Listing
November 2016

Obsessive-compulsive disorder in pregnancy and the postpartum period: course of illness and obstetrical outcome.

Arch Womens Ment Health 2016 Feb 16;19(1):3-10. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Box 843, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA.

The study aimed to examine the course of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) across pregnancy and its impact on obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Women enrolled prior to 20-week gestation in a prospective, observational study. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was completed to obtain lifetime Axis I diagnoses. A total of 56 women with OCD were followed at 1 to 3-month intervals through 52 weeks postpartum. Each visit, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), clinical assessment, and medication/exposure tracking were performed. Obstetric and neonatal data were abstracted from the medical record. In subjects with OCD, associations between perinatal obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCSs) and outcomes were examined. Additionally, outcomes were compared to 156 matched psychiatric patients without OCD. Maternal age inversely correlated with the YBOCS scores across the study period (β = -0.5161, p = .0378). Cesarean section was associated with increased OCSs in the postpartum period compared to vaginal delivery (β = 5.3632, p = 0.043). No associations were found between severity of perinatal obsessions or compulsions and any specific obstetric or neonatal complications. Subjects without OCD had higher frequency of fetal loss compared to mothers with OCD (χ (2) = 4.03, p = 0.043). These novel prospective data fail to identify an association of OCSs with adverse outcomes. In contrast, there is an association of delivery method and younger maternal age with increased postnatal symptoms of OCD. Psychiatric subjects without OCD may have a higher risk of miscarriage and intrauterine fetal demise compared to subjects with OCD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00737-015-0542-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4715787PMC
February 2016
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