Publications by authors named "Samuel Ardois"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Thyroid disorders in familial Mediterranean fever: think about AA amyloidosis!

Clin Rheumatol 2021 08 6;40(8):3381-3382. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Department of Internal Medicine, Tenon Hospital, AP-HP, Sorbonne University, 75020, Paris, France.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-021-05852-yDOI Listing
August 2021

Amyloid Goiter in Familial Mediterranean Fever: Description of 42 Cases from a French Cohort and from Literature Review.

J Clin Med 2021 May 5;10(9). Epub 2021 May 5.

Internal Medicine Department and National Reference Center for Autoinflammatory Diseases and Inflammatory Amyloidosis (CEREMAIA), APHP, Tenon Hospital, Sorbonne University, 4 rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France.

Our aim was to describe the main features of amyloid goiter in adults with amyloidosis secondary to familial Mediterranean fever. Therefore, we analyzed cases from a French cohort of familial Mediterranean fever patients with amyloidosis and from literature review. Forty-two cases were identified: 9 from the French cohort and 33 from literature review. Ninety percent of patients were on hemodialysis for renal amyloidosis before the development of goiter. The goiter grew up rapidly in 88% of cases; 75.6% of patients were euthyroid, 58% displayed dyspnea, and 44.8% dysphagia. Various features were seen on ultrasound, from diffuse to multinodular goiter. When it was performed, fine-needle aspiration biopsy almost always revealed amyloidosis. Thirty-one patients underwent thyroidectomy: to manage compressive symptoms (72%) or rule out malignancy (27%). Histology showed mature adipose tissue in 64% of cases and lymphocytic infiltration in 21.4%. In conclusion, amyloid goiter in familial Mediterranean fever preferentially occurs in patients with end stage renal failure. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy seems to be a sensitive exam for diagnosis, but thyroidectomy remains sometimes necessary to rule out malignancy or release compressive symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091983DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8125620PMC
May 2021

Primary varicella-zoster virus infection of the immunocompromised associated with acute pancreatitis and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Apr;100(16):e25351

CH René Pleven, Department of Internal Medicine, Dinan.

Rationale: Primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection may be associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), as well as with acute pancreatitis. However, there is few data concerning the evolution and the optimal treatment of these rare associations.

Patient Concerns: A 57-year-old immunocompromised woman, who was treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia 3 years prior to admission, was hospitalized with abdominal pain revealing severe acute pancreatitis. The day after admission, a pruritic rash appeared on her face, trunk, and limbs, sparing the palmoplantar regions. At the same time, fever, thrombocytopenia (27 × 109/L), major hyperferritinemia (11,063 μg/mL), hypertriglyceridemia (2.56 mmol/L) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels (1441 IU/L) suggested HLH.

Diagnosis: The diagnosis of chickenpox (varicella) was established. Primary VZV infection was then confirmed: cutaneous and plasma VZV polymerase chain reactions were positives, VZV serology was negative for IgG.

Interventions: Treatment with aciclovir was started intravenously after the onset of the rash, for a total of 10 days. A 48-h surveillance in intensive care was carried out.

Outcomes: Acute pancreatitis and biological abnormalities evolved favorably under aciclovir. Platelet count was normalized 6 days after admission to hospital.

Lessons: A favorable outcome of primary VZV infection associated with severe acute pancreatitis and probable HLH in an immunocompromised patient is possible with aciclovir alone.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000025351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8078430PMC
April 2021

Association between familial Mediterranean fever and multiple sclerosis: A case series from the JIR cohort and systematic literature review.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2021 May 10;50:102834. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Sorbonne University; Internal Medicine Department; AP-HP; Hôpital Tenon; Paris; France; Centre de Référence des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires et des Amyloses Inflammatoire (CEREMAIA)-JIR Cohort; France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disorder; and leads to the uncontrolled production of interleukin (IL)-1β. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system; and its development seems to be partly correlated with IL-1β levels. It is hypothesized that FMF could be associated with MS. We aim to describe the features of patients displaying both diseases and to investigate the MEFV mutation rate in MS patients.

Methods: Patients with definite MS were retrieved from the cohort of FMF patients in the Reference Center for Rare Auto-inflammatory Diseases and Amyloidosis (CEREMAIA). We also performed a systematic literature review of articles from PubMed that were published from 1990 to 2020.

Results: Twenty-four patients were included in the case series: five patients (1.3%) from our cohort of 364 and 19 patients from the literature. The sex ratio was 2:1. The mean age at diagnosis of FMF was 19 years old; and that for MS was 29 years old. Seven studies investigating the MEFV mutation rate in MS patients were included. Three studies found a higher mutation rate in MS patients than in the control group.

Conclusion: FMF and MS features were comparable to those of patients with unrelated diseases; and MEFV mutation carriage was not positively correlated with MS. However; MS prevalence in FMF patients was higher than was expected in a healthy population. To a lesser extent; FMF prevalence in MS patients was higher than expected in a healthy population and the difference might not be significant. These data suggest that FMF could be associated with MS; and further studies are needed to investigate a potential causal association.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2021.102834DOI Listing
May 2021
-->