Publications by authors named "Sammani Ramanayaka"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Distribution, behaviour, bioavailability and remediation of poly- and per-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in solid biowastes and biowaste-treated soil.

Environ Int 2021 Oct 5;155:106600. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA; Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.

Aqueous film-forming foam, used in firefighting, and biowastes, including biosolids, animal and poultry manures, and composts, provide a major source of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) input to soil. Large amounts of biowastes are added to soil as a source of nutrients and carbon. They also are added as soil amendments to improve soil health and crop productivity. Plant uptake of PFAS through soil application of biowastes is a pathway for animal and human exposure to PFAS. The complexity of PFAS mixtures, and their chemical and thermal stability, make remediation of PFAS in both solid and aqueous matrices challenging. Remediation of PFAS in biowastes, as well as soils treated with these biowastes, can be achieved through preventing and decreasing the concentration of PFAS in biowaste sources (i.e., prevention through source control), mobilization of PFAS in contaminated soil and subsequent removal through leaching (i.e., soil washing) and plant uptake (i.e., phytoremediation), sorption of PFAS, thereby decreasing their mobility and bioavailability (i.e., immobilization), and complete removal through thermal and chemical oxidation (i.e., destruction). In this review, the distribution, bioavailability, and remediation of PFAS in soil receiving solid biowastes, which include biosolids, composts, and manure, are presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2021.106600DOI Listing
October 2021

Macro, colloidal and nanobiochar for oxytetracycline removal in synthetic hydrolyzed human urine.

Environ Pollut 2020 Dec 18;267:115683. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Ecosphere Resilience Research Center, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka. Electronic address:

Macro (BC), colloidal (CBC) and nanobiochar (NBC) were examined for the particle size effect for adsorptive removal of oxytetracycline (OTC) and co-occurring nutrients, which are present in synthetic hydrolyzed human urine. The surface morphologies and functionality of biochars were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Experiments for the removal of OTC were performed at the natural pH (pH 9.0) of hydrolyzed human urine using solid-solutions of 3 types of chars (1 g/L) with a contact time of 5 h, at initial OTC concentration of 50 mg/L where isotherm experiments were investigated with OTC concentrations from 25 to 1000 mg/L. The highest maximum adsorption capacity of 136.7 mg/g was reported for CBC, while BC reported slightly low value (129.34 mg/g). Interestingly, NBC demonstrated a two-step adsorption process with two adsorption capacities (16.9 and 113.2 mg/g). Colloidal biochar depicted the highest adsorption for NH, PO, and SO nutrients. All 3 types of chars showed strong retention with a poor desorption (6% in average) of OTC in synthetic hydrolyzed urine medium. CBC and NBC demonstrated both physisorption and chemisorption, whereas the OTC removal by BC was solely via physisorption. Nevertheless, CBC biochar demonstrated the best performance in adsorptive removal of OTC and nutrients in hydrolyzed human urine and its capability towards wastewater treatment. As the removal of nutrients were low, the treated urine can possibly be used as a safe fertilizer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115683DOI Listing
December 2020

Implications of layered double hydroxides assembled biochar composite in adsorptive removal of contaminants: Current status and future perspectives.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Oct 28;737:139718. Epub 2020 May 28.

Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland. Electronic address:

In recent years, biochar composites have received considerable attention for environmental applications. This paper reviews the current state of research on Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) tailored biochar composites in terms of their synthesis methods, characteristics, and their use as adsorbents for the removal of various pollutants from water, highlighting and discussing the key advancement in this area. The adsorption potential of LDHs-biochar composites for different inorganic and organic contaminants, important factors affecting composites' properties and the adsorption process, and the mechanisms involved in adsorption are discussed in this review. Though the adsorption capacities are high for the composites studied, partition coefficient which suggest the performance of composites remain low for most adsorbents. Despite the recent progress in the synthesis of LDHs-biochar composites, further research is needed to improve the performance of composites for different classes of aquatic pollutants, and to test their applicability in pilot-scale with real wastewater under real environmental conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.139718DOI Listing
October 2020

Green synthesis of graphitic nanobiochar for the removal of emerging contaminants in aqueous media.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Mar 28;706:135725. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

Ecosphere Resilience Research Center, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka. Electronic address:

This study reports the preparation of nanobiochar (NBC) via top-down approach of bioenergy waste-derived dendro biochar through mechanised grinding in order to assess its capacity to remove emerging contaminants, such as antibiotics, agrochemicals, and potentially toxic elements from aqueous media. Preconditioned biochar was disc milled in ethanol media, and the resulting colloidal biochar was dispersed in water to obtain the NBC fraction by centrifugation. Adsorption edge and isotherm experiments were carried out at pH 3 to 8 and NBC dosages of 0.5 g/L for oxytetracycline (OTC), glyphosate (GL), hexavalent chromium (CrVI), and cadmium (CdII). NBC was characterised by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which demonstrated the flakey and graphitic nature of the NBC particles with a surface area of 28 m/g and the presence of different functional groups, such as OH, CO, NH, and CH. The best pH for OTC and Cd(II) was 9, whereas the best pH levels for GL and Cr(VI) were 7 and 4, respectively. Isotherms depicted a positive cooperative adsorption mechanism by providing the best fit to the Hills equation, with high removal capacities for four contaminants. Dendro NBC showed the best performance, demonstrated by the high partition coefficient for the removal of OTC, GL, Cr(VI), and Cd(II) over various types of adsorbents. The overall results indicated that graphitic NBC produced by mechanical grinding of dendro biochar is a promising material for the removal of OTC, GL, Cr(VI), and Cd(II) from aqueous media.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135725DOI Listing
March 2020

Halloysite nanoclay supported adsorptive removal of oxytetracycline antibiotic from aqueous media.

J Hazard Mater 2020 02 26;384:121301. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Ecosphere Resilience Research Center, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka. Electronic address:

Halloysite nanoclay was utilized to retain aqueous oxytetracycline (OTC) which is extensively used in the veterinary industry. The micro-structure and functionality of the nanoclay were characterized through spectroscopic techniques before and after adsorption. The OTC removal experiments were performed at different pH conditions (pH 3.0-9.0), ionic strengths (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 M NaNO) and contact time (up to 32 h) at an initial 25 mg/L OTC concentration with 1.0 g/L halloysite. Oxytetracycline adsorption was pH dependent, and the best pH was observed in the range of pH 3.5-5.5 at a 0.001 M ionic strength. At pH 3.5, the maximum OTC adsorption amount was 21 mg/g which translated to 68% removal of the initial OTC loading. Positively charged inner lumen and negatively charged outer lumen of the tubular halloysite structure led to form inner-sphere complexes with the anionic and cationic forms of OTC, respectively. A rapid adsorption of OTC was observed in the kinetic study where 62% OTC was adsorbed in 90 min.. Pseudo-second order equation obeyed by the kinetic data indicated that the adsorption was governed by chemisorption, whereas Hill isotherm equation was the most fitted with a maximum adsorption capacity of 52.4 mg/g indicating a cooperative adsorption phenomenon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.121301DOI Listing
February 2020