Publications by authors named "Sameer Vohra"

11 Publications

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Designing Policy Solutions to Build a Healthier Rural America.

J Law Med Ethics 2020 09;48(3):491-505

Sameer Vohra, M.D., J.D., M.A., F.A.A.P., is the Founding Chair of Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's (SIU SOM) Department of Population Science and Policy. A general pediatrician, Dr. Vohra is also an Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Medical Humanities, and Law. Dr. Vohra completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Chicago (Chicago, IL), as well as earning a Master of Arts in public policy at the University of Chicago (Chicago, IL), a medical doctorate at SIU SOM (Springfield, IL), a juris doctorate, graduating first in his class, at SIU School of Law (Carbondale, IL), and a Bachelor of Arts with honors at Northwestern University (Evanston, IL). Carolyn Pointer, J.D., is an Assistant Professor in Medical Humanities, and the Policy Director in the Department of Population Science and Policy at the SIU School of Medicine (Springfield, IL). Her background in Medical-Legal Partnerships focuses her work on the social determinants of health. Professor Pointer earned her J.D. from Boston University School of Law (Boston, MA), and a Bachelor of Science with honors at the Boston University School of Education (Boston, MA). Amanda Fogleman, M.Eng., Senior Research Project Coordinator, is one of the founding members of Southern Illinois University (SIU) Medicine's Department of Population Science and Policy (Springfield, IL). Ms. Fogleman graduated from Southern Illinois University Edwards-ville (Edwardsville, IL) with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and the University of Illinois Chicago with a Master of Engineering in Bioinformatics (Chicago, IL). T.J. Albers, M.A., is a Health Policy Coordinator at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine's Department of Population Science and Policy. He received his B.A. from Illinois College (Jacksonville, IL) and M.A. from University of Illinois - Springfield (Springfield, IL). His research focuses on rural health care delivery, policy development, and addressing rural health disparities. Anish Patel is a J.D candidate at the University of Georgia School of Law (Athens, Georgia). He received his B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Georgia (Athens, Georgia). He previously worked as a Research Chemist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, Georgia). Elizabeth Weeks, J.D., is Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Charles H. Kirbo Chair in Law at the University of Georgia School of Law (Athens, Georgia). She received her B.A. from Columbia University (New York, New York) and JD from the University of Georgia School of Law (Athens, Georgia). She previously served on the faculty of the University of Kansas School of Law (Lawrence, Kansas), where she was director of the medical-legal partnership clinic and has visited at University of the Pacific-McGeorge School of Law (Sacramento, California). Her research and teaching focus is in health care financing and regulation and public health law.

Disparities exist in the health, livelihood, and opportunities for the 46-60 million people living in America's rural communities. Rural communities across the United States need a new energy and focus concentrated around health and health care that allows for the designing capturing, and spreading of existing and new innovations. This paper aims to provide a framework for policy solutions to build a healthier rural America describing both the current state of rural health policy and the policies and practices in states that could be used as a national model for positive change.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073110520958874DOI Listing
September 2020

Focusing on Vulnerable Populations During COVID-19.

Acad Med 2020 11;95(11):e2-e3

Program director, Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism Fellowship, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, and Phoenix Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000003571DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7363379PMC
November 2020

Incentivized Screening to Reduce Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk and Prevalence.

Sex Transm Dis 2019 10;46(10):654-656

STD Section, Illinois Department of Public Health, Springfield, IL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001049DOI Listing
October 2019

Pediatric population health analysis of southern and central Illinois region: A cross sectional retrospective study using association rule mining and multiple logistic regression.

Comput Methods Programs Biomed 2019 Sep 18;178:145-153. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Office of Population Science and Policy, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address:

Background: Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM) collects large amounts of data every day. SIUSOM and other similar healthcare systems are always looking for better ways to use the data to understand and address population level problems. The purpose of this study is to analyze the administrative dataset for pediatric patients served by Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM) to uncover patterns that correlate specific demographic information to diagnoses of pediatric diseases. The study uses a cross-sectional database of medical billing information for all pediatric patients served by SIUSOM between June 2013 and December 2016. The dataset consists of about 980.9K clinical visits for 65.4K unique patients and includes patient demographic identifiers such as their sex, date of birth, race, anonymous zipcode and primary and secondary insurance plan as well as the related pediatric diagnosis codes. The goal is to find unknown correlations in this database.

Method: We proposed a two step methodology to derive unknown correlations in SIUSOM administrative database. First, Class association rule mining was used as a well-established data mining method to generate hypothesis and derive associations of the form D → M, where D is diagnosis code of a pediatric disease and M is a patient demographic identifier (age,sex, anonymous zipcode, insurance plan, or race). The resulting associations were pruned and filtered using measures such as lift, odds ratio, relative risk, and confidence. The final associations were selected by a pediatric doctor based on their clinical significance. Second,each association rule in the final set was further validated and adjusted odds ratios were obtained using multiple logistic regression.

Results: Several associations were found correlating specific patients' residential zip codes with the diagnosis codes for viral hepatitis carrier, exposure to communicable diseases, screening for mental and developmental disorder in childhood, history allergy to medications, disturbance of emotions specific to childhood, and acute sinusitis. In addition, the results show that African American patients are more likely to be screened for mental and developmental disorders compared to White patients for SIUSOM pediatric population (Odds Ratio (OR):3.56, 95% Confidence Interval (CI):[3.29,3.85]).

Conclusion: Class association rule mining is an effective method for detecting signals in a large patient administrative database and generating hypotheses which correlate patients' demographics with diagnosis of pediatric diseases. A post processing of the hypotheses generated by this method is necessary to prune spurious associations and select a set of clinically relevant hypotheses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmpb.2019.06.020DOI Listing
September 2019

The Promise of Precision Population Health: Reducing Health Disparities Through a Community Partnership Framework.

Adv Pediatr 2019 08 26;66:1-13. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, 550 16th Street, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yapd.2019.03.002DOI Listing
August 2019

The Role of Community Health Needs Assessments in Medicalizing Poverty.

J Law Med Ethics 2018 Sep;46(3):615-621

Arden Caffrey was Health Policy Specialist, Department of Population Science and Policy, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. Carolyn Pointer, J.D., is Director of Policy, Department of Population Science and Policy, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. David Steward, M.D., M.P.H., is Vice Chair of Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement in Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. Sameer Vohra, M.D., J.D., M.A., F.A.A.P., is Executive Director, Department of Population Science and Policy, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), passed in 2010, is considered by many to be the most significant healthcare overhaul since the 1960s, but part of its promise - improvement of population health through requirements for non-profit hospitals to provide "community benefit" - has not been met. This paper examines the history of community benefit legislation, how community benefit dollars are allocated, and innovative practices by a few hospitals and communities that are addressing primarily non-medical factors that influence health such as social disadvantage, attitudes, beliefs, risk exposure, and social inequalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073110518804212DOI Listing
September 2018

A piece of my mind. Learning not to move forward.

Authors:
Sameer Vohra

JAMA 2014 Dec;312(21):2215-6

Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2014.12931DOI Listing
December 2014

SERVICE: Selecting Educational Residencies with Value, Incentives, Cost, and Effectiveness.

Acad Med 2010 Nov;85(11):1682

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181f593beDOI Listing
November 2010

Irregular menses linked to vomiting in a nonclinical sample: findings from the National Eating Disorders Screening Program in high schools.

J Adolesc Health 2008 May 4;42(5):450-7. Epub 2008 Mar 4.

Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Purpose: Using data from an eating disorders screening initiative conducted in high schools across the United States, we examined the relationship between vomiting frequency and irregular menses in a nonclinical sample of adolescent females.

Methods: A self-report questionnaire was administered to students from U.S. high schools participating in the National Eating Disorders Screening Program in 2000. The questionnaire included items on frequency of vomiting for weight control in the past 3 months, other eating disorder symptoms, frequency of menses, height, and weight. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted using data from 2791 girls to estimate the risk of irregular menses (defined as menses less often than monthly) associated with vomiting frequency, adjusting for other eating disorder symptoms, weight status, age, race/ethnicity, and school clusters.

Results: Girls who vomited to control their weight one to three times per month were one and a half times more likely (risk ratio [RR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-2.2), and girls who vomited once per week or more often were more than three times more likely (RR = 3.2; 95% CI = 2.3-4.4), to experience irregular menses than were girls who did not report vomiting for weight control. Vomiting for weight control remained a strong predictor of irregular menses even when overweight and underweight participants were excluded.

Conclusions: Our study adds to the evidence that vomiting may have a direct effect on hormonal function in adolescent girls, and that vomiting for weight control may be a particularly deleterious component of eating disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.11.139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3206632PMC
May 2008

An American Muslim's right to die. Incorporating Islamic law into the debate.

Authors:
Sameer S Vohra

J Leg Med 2006 Sep;27(3):341-59

Southern Illinois University, IL 62901, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01947640600870932DOI Listing
September 2006
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