Publications by authors named "Samara C Ferreira-Machado"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Biological effects induced by doses of mammographic screening.

Phys Med 2021 Jul 12;87:90-98. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Radiological Sciences (LCR), State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Pavilhão Haroldo Lisboa da Cunha, Rua São Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, RJ CEP 20550-900, Brazil.

Purpose: Mammography is the diagnostic imaging practice used in screening to detect early lesions suspected of malignancy. It uses a low energy X-ray beam in which a low dose in the order of 2-3 mGy is delivered to patient breast cells. However, it has been speculated that it could lead to significant cell damage, when compared to conventional X-ray. We investigated the biological effects of low doses, with mean glandular doses (MGDs) of 2.5 mGy and 2.5 + 2.5 mGy, on mammary cells in vitro.

Methods: We used the non-tumorigenic cell line (MCF-10A) and two tumor cells lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). Colony formation, apoptosis, and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) were quantified.

Results: The selected MGD regimens did not alter the formation of colonies by any of the cell lines. MCF-7 cells exhibited a markedly increase in apoptosis, 24 h after the single-dose protocol; MCF-10A cells underwent apoptosis only after 72 h, with both irradiation regimens, while MDA-MB-231 cells (highly invasive and metastatic) were not susceptible to apoptosis. The detection of γH2AX histone in the nuclei of irradiated cells showed that the double-dose resulted in increase of DSBs, especially in tumor cell lines.

Conclusions: Although the health benefits of early breast screening remain indisputable, our future perspective is to better understand the biological basis for the effects of low dose radiation on breast cells and to investigate if and under what conditions there would be a risky situation in repeated mammography screening, in both asymptomatic and symptomatic women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmp.2021.06.002DOI Listing
July 2021

Preliminary pre-clinical studies on the side effects of breast cancer treatment.

Int J Radiat Biol 2021 5;97(7):877-887. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Histology and Embryology, Rio de Janeiro State University (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Technological advancement in the treatment of cancer together with early detection and diagnosis have considerably improved the survival of breast cancer patients. On the other hand, the potential of patients developing side effects from cancer treatment are not negligible. Despite the progress that has been made in terms of early diagnosis, therapy, and survival, including improvements in the chemotherapeutic agents, radiation and molecular targeted therapies, cardiotoxicity of cancer therapy is still cause for concern. Radiation therapy for breast cancer is associated with increased risk of heart disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, the association of radiation therapy to chemotherapy is an important aspect to be considered in the development of cardiac disease, as this could play an additional role as a risk factor. Besides the heart effect, other side effects can be observed in the bone, ovary, uteri, and other organs. This paper aims to review the recent literature to present the current understanding of side effects associated with breast cancer treatment. The focus is on recent preclinical studies that have assessed potential changes in different organs that may be injured after breast cancer treatment, both due to both radiation and chemotherapy agents. Radiation-induced heart disease is one important side effect that must be considered during the treatment planning and patient follow-up. The cardiac damage can be potentialized when chemotherapy is associated to radiotherapy, and the literature findings indicate that heart fibrosis plays an important role at the radio-chemotherapy induced cardiac damage. Literature findings also showed important side effects at the bone, that can lead to ospeoporosis, due to the decrease of calcium, after radio or chemotherapy treatments. This decrease could be explained by the ovarian failure observed at rats after chemotherapy treatment. It is of great importance to acknowledge the complications originating from the treatment, so that new strategies can be developed. In this way, it will be possible to minimize side effects and improve the patients' quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09553002.2021.1919782DOI Listing
May 2021

Common Deletion (CD) in mitochondrial DNA of irradiated rat heart.

An Acad Bras Cienc 2014 06 25;86(2):685-694. Epub 2014 Apr 25.

Laboratório de Ciências Radiológicas, Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.

The purpose of this study was to map the common deletion (CD) area in mtDNA and investigate the levels of this deletion in irradiated heart. The assays were developed in male Wistar rats that were irradiated with three different single doses (5, 10 or 15 Gy) delivered directly to the heart and the analyses were performed at various times post-irradiation (3, 15 or 120 days). The CDs area were sequenced and the CD quantified by real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the CD levels progressively decreased from the 3rd until the 15th day after irradiation, and then increased thereafter. Additionally, it was observed that the levels of CD are modulated differently according to the different categories of doses (moderate and high). This study demonstrated an immediate response to ionizing radiation, measured by the presence of mutations in the CD area and a decrease in the CD levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0001-37652014110912DOI Listing
June 2014

Caspase-3 activation and increased procollagen type I in irradiated hearts.

An Acad Bras Cienc 2013 Mar 1;85(1):215-22. Epub 2013 Mar 1.

Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto de Biologia, Departamento de Biologia Geral, Niterói, RJ, Brasil.

The caspase-3-cleaved presence was evaluated in this study in the heart of irradiated rats, during the decline of ventricular function. Female Wistar rats were irradiated with a single dose of radiation (15 Gy) delivered directly to the heart and the molecular, histological and physiological evaluations were performed at thirteen months post-irradiation. The expressions of procollagen type I, TGF-ß1 and caspase-3-cleaved were analyzed using Western blotting. Cardiac structural and functional alterations were investigated by echocardiography and electron microscopy. In the irradiated group, the levels of procollagen type I, TGF-ß1 and caspase-3-cleaved are increased. Significant histological changes (degeneration of heart tissue and collagen deposition) and functional (reduced ejection fraction) were observed. Data suggest that the cardiac function decline after exposure to ionizing radiation is related, in part, to increased collagen and increased caspase-3-cleaved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0001-37652013005000009DOI Listing
March 2013
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