Publications by authors named "Samantha M Reiss"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Systems Biology Methods Applied to Blood and Tissue for a Comprehensive Analysis of Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in Adults.

Front Immunol 2020 4;11:580373. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Vaccine Evaluation Center, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Conventional vaccine design has been based on trial-and-error approaches, which have been generally successful. However, there have been some major failures in vaccine development and we still do not have highly effective licensed vaccines for tuberculosis, HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and other major infections of global significance. Approaches at rational vaccine design have been limited by our understanding of the immune response to vaccination at the molecular level. Tools now exist to undertake in-depth analysis using systems biology approaches, but to be fully realized, studies are required in humans with intensive blood and tissue sampling. Methods that support this intensive sampling need to be developed and validated as feasible. To this end, we describe here a detailed approach that was applied in a study of 15 healthy adults, who were immunized with hepatitis B vaccine. Sampling included ~350 mL of blood, 12 microbiome samples, and lymph node fine needle aspirates obtained over a ~7-month period, enabling comprehensive analysis of the immune response at the molecular level, including single cell and tissue sample analysis. Samples were collected for analysis of immune phenotyping, whole blood and single cell gene expression, proteomics, lipidomics, epigenetics, whole blood response to key immune stimuli, cytokine responses, T cell responses, antibody repertoire analysis and the microbiome. Data integration was undertaken using different approaches-NetworkAnalyst and DIABLO. Our results demonstrate that such intensive sampling studies are feasible in healthy adults, and data integration tools exist to analyze the vast amount of data generated from a multi-omics systems biology approach. This will provide the basis for a better understanding of vaccine-induced immunity and accelerate future rational vaccine design.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.580373DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7672042PMC
November 2020

Normal human lymph node T follicular helper cells and germinal center B cells accessed via fine needle aspirations.

J Immunol Methods 2020 04 17;479:112746. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA 92103, USA.. Electronic address:

Germinal centers (GC) are critically important for maturation of the antibody response and generation of memory B cells, processes that form the basis for long-term protection from pathogens. GCs only occur in lymphoid tissue, such as lymph nodes, and are not present in blood. Therefore, GC B cells and GC T follicular helper (T) cells are not well-studied in humans under normal healthy conditions, due to the limited availability of healthy lymph node samples. We used a minimally invasive, routine clinical procedure, lymph node fine needle aspirations (LN FNAs), to obtain LN cells from healthy human subjects. This study of 73 LNs demonstrates that human LN FNAs are a safe and feasible technique for immunological research, and suggests benchmarks for human GC biology under noninflammatory conditions. The findings indicate that assessment of the GC response via LN FNAs will have application to the study of human vaccination, allergy, and autoimmune disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jim.2020.112746DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200018PMC
April 2020

Rapid Germinal Center and Antibody Responses in Non-human Primates after a Single Nanoparticle Vaccine Immunization.

Cell Rep 2019 11;29(7):1756-1766.e8

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Development, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA 92103, USA. Electronic address:

The first immunization in a protein prime-boost vaccination is likely to be critical for how the immune response unfolds. Using fine needle aspirates (FNAs) of draining lymph nodes (LNs), we tracked the kinetics of the primary immune response in rhesus monkeys immunized intramuscularly (IM) or subcutaneously (s.c.) with an eOD-GT8 60-mer nanoparticle immunogen to facilitate clinical trial design. Significant numbers of germinal center B (B) cells and antigen-specific CD4 T cells were detectable in the draining LN as early as 7 days post-immunization and peaked near day 21. Strikingly, s.c. immunization results in 10-fold larger antigen-specific B cell responses compared to IM immunization. Lymphatic drainage studies revealed that s.c. immunization resulted in faster and more consistent axillary LN drainage than IM immunization. These data indicate robust antigen-specific germinal center responses can occur rapidly to a single immunization with a nanoparticle immunogen and vaccine drainage substantially impacts immune responses in local LNs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.10.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6905039PMC
November 2019

Vaccine-Induced Protection from Homologous Tier 2 SHIV Challenge in Nonhuman Primates Depends on Serum-Neutralizing Antibody Titers.

Immunity 2019 01 11;50(1):241-252.e6. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery (CHAVI-ID), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center and the Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery (CAVD), The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address:

Passive administration of HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) can protect macaques from hard-to-neutralize (tier 2) chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, conditions for nAb-mediated protection after vaccination have not been established. Here, we selected groups of 6 rhesus macaques with either high or low serum nAb titers from a total of 78 animals immunized with recombinant native-like (SOSIP) Env trimers. Repeat intrarectal challenge with homologous tier 2 SHIV led to rapid infection in unimmunized and low-titer animals. High-titer animals, however, demonstrated protection that was gradually lost as nAb titers waned over time. An autologous serum ID nAb titer of ∼1:500 afforded more than 90% protection from medium-dose SHIV infection. In contrast, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and T cell activity did not correlate with protection. Therefore, Env protein-based vaccination strategies can protect against hard-to-neutralize SHIV challenge in rhesus macaques by inducing tier 2 nAbs, provided appropriate neutralizing titers can be reached and maintained.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2018.11.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335502PMC
January 2019

The human naive B cell repertoire contains distinct subclasses for a germline-targeting HIV-1 vaccine immunogen.

Sci Transl Med 2018 07;10(448)

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Traditional vaccine development to prevent some of the worst current pandemic diseases has been unsuccessful so far. Germline-targeting immunogens have potential to prime protective antibodies (Abs) via more targeted immune responses. Success of germline-targeting vaccines in humans will depend on the composition of the human naive B cell repertoire, including the frequencies and affinities of epitope-specific B cells. However, the human naive B cell repertoire remains largely undefined. Assessment of antigen-specific human naive B cells among hundreds of millions of B cells from multiple donors may be used as pre-phase 1 ex vivo human testing to potentially forecast B cell and Ab responses to new vaccine designs. VRC01 is an HIV broadly neutralizing Ab (bnAb) against the envelope CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We characterized naive human B cells recognizing eOD-GT8, a germline-targeting HIV-1 vaccine candidate immunogen designed to prime VRC01-class Abs. Several distinct subclasses of VRC01-class naive B cells were identified, sharing sequence characteristics with inferred precursors of known bnAbs VRC01, VRC23, PCIN63, and N6. Multiple naive B cell clones exactly matched mature VRC01-class bnAb L-CDR3 sequences. Non-VRC01-class B cells were also characterized, revealing recurrent public light chain sequences. Unexpectedly, we also identified naive B cells related to the IOMA-class CD4bs bnAb. These different subclasses within the human repertoire had strong initial affinities () to the immunogen, up to 13 nM, and represent encouraging indications that multiple independent pathways may exist for vaccine-elicited VRC01-class bnAb development in most individuals. The frequencies of these distinct eOD-GT8 B cell specificities give insights into antigen-specific compositional features of the human naive B cell repertoire and provide actionable information for vaccine design and advancement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aat0381DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6145074PMC
July 2018

BALDR: a computational pipeline for paired heavy and light chain immunoglobulin reconstruction in single-cell RNA-seq data.

Genome Med 2018 03 20;10(1):20. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, GA, USA.

B cells play a critical role in the immune response by producing antibodies, which display remarkable diversity. Here we describe a bioinformatic pipeline, BALDR (BCR Assignment of Lineage using De novo Reconstruction) that accurately reconstructs the paired heavy and light chain immunoglobulin gene sequences from Illumina single-cell RNA-seq data. BALDR was accurate for clonotype identification in human and rhesus macaque influenza vaccine and simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine induced vaccine-induced plasmablasts and naïve and antigen-specific memory B cells. BALDR enables matching of clonotype identity with single-cell transcriptional information in B cell lineages and will have broad application in the fields of vaccines, human immunodeficiency virus broadly neutralizing antibody development, and cancer.BALDR is available at https://github.com/BosingerLab/BALDR .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-018-0528-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859752PMC
March 2018

Structure-based design of native-like HIV-1 envelope trimers to silence non-neutralizing epitopes and eliminate CD4 binding.

Nat Commun 2017 11 21;8(1):1655. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.

Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a primary HIV vaccine goal. Native-like trimers mimicking virion-associated spikes present nearly all bnAb epitopes and are therefore promising vaccine antigens. However, first generation native-like trimers expose epitopes for non-neutralizing antibodies (non-nAbs), which may hinder bnAb induction. We here employ computational and structure-guided design to develop improved native-like trimers that reduce exposure of non-nAb epitopes in the V3-loop and trimer base, minimize both CD4 reactivity and CD4-induced non-nAb epitope exposure, and increase thermal stability while maintaining bnAb antigenicity. In rabbit immunizations with native-like trimers of the 327c isolate, improved trimers suppress elicitation of V3-directed and tier-1 neutralizing antibodies and induce robust autologous tier-2 neutralization, unlike a first-generation trimer. The improved native-like trimers from diverse HIV isolates, and the design methods, have promise to assist in the development of a HIV vaccine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01549-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5698488PMC
November 2017

Direct Probing of Germinal Center Responses Reveals Immunological Features and Bottlenecks for Neutralizing Antibody Responses to HIV Env Trimer.

Cell Rep 2016 11;17(9):2195-2209

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Scripps Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address:

Generating tier 2 HIV-neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses by immunization remains a challenging problem, and the immunological barriers to induction of such responses with Env immunogens remain unclear. Here, some rhesus monkeys developed autologous tier 2 nAbs upon HIV Env trimer immunization (SOSIP.v5.2) whereas others did not. This was not because HIV Env trimers were immunologically silent because all monkeys made similar ELISA-binding antibody responses; the key difference was nAb versus non-nAb responses. We explored the immunological barriers to HIV nAb responses by combining a suite of techniques, including longitudinal lymph node fine needle aspirates. Unexpectedly, nAb development best correlated with booster immunization GC B cell magnitude and Tfh characteristics of the Env-specific CD4 T cells. Notably, these factors distinguished between successful and unsuccessful antibody responses because GC B cell frequencies and stoichiometry to GC Tfh cells correlated with nAb development, but did not correlate with total Env Ab binding titers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.10.085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5142765PMC
November 2016

A Cytokine-Independent Approach To Identify Antigen-Specific Human Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells and Rare Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells in Blood.

J Immunol 2016 08 24;197(3):983-93. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037; Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, La Jolla, CA 92037; and

Detection of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells is central to the study of many human infectious diseases, vaccines, and autoimmune diseases. However, such cells are generally rare and heterogeneous in their cytokine profiles. Identification of Ag-specific germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells by cytokine production has been particularly problematic. The function of a GC Tfh cell is to selectively help adjacent GC B cells via cognate interaction; thus, GC Tfh cells may be stingy cytokine producers, fundamentally different from Th1 or Th17 cells in the quantities of cytokines produced. Conventional identification of Ag-specific cells by intracellular cytokine staining relies on the ability of the CD4(+) T cell to generate substantial amounts of cytokine. To address this problem, we have developed a cytokine-independent activation-induced marker (AIM) methodology to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in human lymphoid tissue. Whereas Group A Streptococcus-specific GC Tfh cells produced minimal detectable cytokines by intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM method identified 85-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. Intriguingly, these GC Tfh cells consistently expressed programmed death ligand 1 upon activation. AIM also detected non-Tfh cells in lymphoid tissue. As such, we applied AIM for identification of rare Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells in human peripheral blood. Dengue, tuberculosis, and pertussis vaccine-specific CD4(+) T cells were readily detectable by AIM. In summary, cytokine assays missed 98% of Ag-specific human GC Tfh cells, reflecting the biology of these cells, which could instead be sensitively identified by coexpression of TCR-dependent activation markers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1600318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955771PMC
August 2016

Cytokine-Independent Detection of Antigen-Specific Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells in Immunized Nonhuman Primates Using a Live Cell Activation-Induced Marker Technique.

J Immunol 2016 08 22;197(3):994-1002. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, La Jolla, CA 92037;

A range of current candidate AIDS vaccine regimens are focused on generating protective HIV-neutralizing Ab responses. Many of these efforts rely on the rhesus macaque animal model. Understanding how protective Ab responses develop and how to increase their efficacy are both major knowledge gaps. Germinal centers (GCs) are the engines of Ab affinity maturation. GC T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4 T cells are required for GCs. Studying vaccine-specific GC Tfh cells after protein immunizations has been challenging, as Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are difficult to identify by conventional intracellular cytokine staining. Cytokine production by GC Tfh cells may be intrinsically limited in comparison with other Th effector cells, as the biological role of a GC Tfh cell is to provide help to individual B cells within the GC, rather than secreting large amounts of cytokines bathing a tissue. To test this idea, we developed a cytokine-independent method to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. RNA sequencing was performed using TCR-stimulated GC Tfh cells to identify candidate markers. Validation experiments determined CD25 (IL-2Rα) and OX40 to be highly upregulated activation-induced markers (AIM) on the surface of GC Tfh cells after stimulation. In comparison with intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM assay identified >10-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in HIV Env protein-immunized macaques (BG505 SOSIP). CD4 T cells in blood were also studied. In summary, AIM demonstrates that Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are intrinsically stingy producers of cytokines, which is likely an essential part of their biological function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1600320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955744PMC
August 2016

CXCL13 is a plasma biomarker of germinal center activity.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2016 Mar 23;113(10):2702-7. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037; Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, La Jolla, CA 92037;

Significantly higher levels of plasma CXCL13 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13] were associated with the generation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV in a large longitudinal cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Germinal centers (GCs) perform the remarkable task of optimizing B-cell Ab responses. GCs are required for almost all B-cell receptor affinity maturation and will be a critical parameter to monitor if HIV bnAbs are to be induced by vaccination. However, lymphoid tissue is rarely available from immunized humans, making the monitoring of GC activity by direct assessment of GC B cells and germinal center CD4(+) T follicular helper (GC Tfh) cells problematic. The CXCL13-CXCR5 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5] chemokine axis plays a central role in organizing both B-cell follicles and GCs. Because GC Tfh cells can produce CXCL13, we explored the potential use of CXCL13 as a blood biomarker to indicate GC activity. In a series of studies, we found that plasma CXCL13 levels correlated with GC activity in draining lymph nodes of immunized mice, immunized macaques, and HIV-infected humans. Furthermore, plasma CXCL13 levels in immunized humans correlated with the magnitude of Ab responses and the frequency of ICOS(+) (inducible T-cell costimulator) Tfh-like cells in blood. Together, these findings support the potential use of CXCL13 as a plasma biomarker of GC activity in human vaccine trials and other clinical settings.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1520112113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4790995PMC
March 2016