Publications by authors named "Samantha D Minc"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Anesthetic choice for arteriovenous access creation: A National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry analysis.

J Vasc Access 2021 Sep 21:11297298211045495. Epub 2021 Sep 21.

Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anesthesiology, Department of Anesthesiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA.

Background: We sought to evaluate differences in primary anesthetic type used in arteriovenous access creation with the hypothesis that administration of regional anesthesia and monitored anesthesia care (MAC) with local anesthesia as the primary anesthetic has increased over time.

Methods: National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry data were retrospectively evaluated. Covariates were selected a priori within multivariate models to determine predictors of anesthetic type in adults who underwent elective arteriovenous access creation between 2010 and 2018.

Results: A total of 144,392 patients met criteria; 90,741 (62.8%) received general anesthesia. The use of regional anesthesia and MAC decreased over time (8.0%-6.8%, 36.8%-27.8%, respectively; both  < 0.0001). Patients who underwent regional anesthesia were more likely to have ASA physical status >III and to reside in rural areas (52.3% and 12.9%, respectively; both  < 0.0001). Patients who underwent MAC were more likely to be older, male, receive care outside the South, and reside in urban areas (median age 65, 56.8%, 68.1%, and 70.8%, respectively; all  < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that being male, having an ASA physical status >III, and each 5-year increase in age resulted in increased odds of receiving alternatives to general anesthesia (regional anesthesia adjusted odds ratios (AORs) 1.06, 1.12, and 1.26, MAC AORs 1.09, 1.2, and 1.1, respectively; all  < 0.0001). Treatment in the Midwest, South, or West was associated with decreased odds of receiving alternatives to general anesthesia compared to the Northeast (regional anesthesia AORs 0.28, 0.38, and 0.03, all  < 0.0001; MAC 0.76, 0.13, and 0.43, respectively; all  < 0.05).

Conclusions: Use of regional anesthesia and MAC with local anesthesia for arteriovenous access creation has decreased over time with general anesthesia remaining the primary anesthetic type. Anesthetic choice, however, varies with patient characteristics and geography.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/11297298211045495DOI Listing
September 2021

Healthcare disparities in vascular surgery: A critical review.

J Vasc Surg 2021 08;74(2S):6S-14S.e1

Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV.

Health disparities in vascular surgical care have existed for decades. Persons categorized as Black undergo a nearly twofold greater risk-adjusted rate of leg amputations. Persons categorized as Black, Latinx, and women have hemodialysis initiated via autogenous fistula less often than male persons categorized as White. Persons categorized as Black, Latino, Latina, or Latinx, and women are less likely to undergo carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis and repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. New approaches are needed to address these disparities. We suggest surgeons use data to identify groups that would most benefit from medical care and then partner with community organizations or individuals to create lasting health benefits. Surgeons alone cannot rectify the structural inequalities present in American society. However, all surgeons should contribute to ensuring that all people have access to high-quality vascular surgical care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2021.03.055DOI Listing
August 2021

Disparities in amputation in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

Surgery 2021 06 27;169(6):1290-1294. Epub 2021 Feb 27.

Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Electronic address: https://twitter.com/SamanthaMinc.

Background: To describe peripheral arterial disease-related amputation as a marker for health disparities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2021.01.025DOI Listing
June 2021

Sex-related disparities in intervention rates and type of intervention in patients with aortic and peripheral arterial diseases in the National Inpatient Sample Database.

J Vasc Surg 2021 06 8;73(6):2081-2089.e7. Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV.

Objective: The first annual Women's Vascular Summit highlighted sex- and gender-related knowledge gaps in vascular disease diagnosis and treatment. This finding suggests an opportunity for further research to improve care and outcomes in people who identify as women, specifically. The purpose of this study was to a large national dataset to identify all operations performed for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), carotid artery stenosis (CAS), and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the United States, and to provide data on sex-related disparities in treatment.

Methods: All hospitalizations of adult patients (≥18 years old) diagnosed with AAA, CAS, or PAD who underwent vascular surgery from 2000 to 2016 were identified in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Sex-stratified U.S. Census data and sex-specific population disease prevalence estimates from the National Institute of Health and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality were used to calculate the number of U.S. adults with AAA, CAS, and PAD. Sex-stratified rates of surgery and incidence rate ratios were estimated using Poisson regression. Among those undergoing surgery, multivariable logistic regression was used to assess differences in endovascular vs open approach.

Results: Over 16 years, there were 1,021,684 hospitalizations for vascular surgery: 13% AAA (21% female, 79% male), 40% CAS (42% female, 58% male), and 47% PAD (42% female, 58% male). Females were older than males at time of surgery (median age, 71.3 years vs 69.7 years) and less likely to have private insurance (18% vs 23%); minimal differences were seen across race/ethnicity, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics. After accounting for disease prevalence, females were still 25% less likely to undergo surgery for AAA and 30% less likely to undergo surgery for PAD compared with males with the same disease. These results were consistent over time. After adjustment, females, compared with males, were less likely to receive an endovascular procedure compared with open for AAA or CAS, and more likely to receive one for PAD.

Conclusions: From 2000 to 2016 in the United States, females were less likely to undergo intervention for AAA and PAD than males. This finding is particularly significant for PAD, because the prevalence is the same for both sexes, indicating that females are likely undertreated for PAD. Additionally, females were less likely to undergo endovascular surgery for AAA and more likely to undergo endovascular surgery for PAD than males. These findings suggest that improvement in AAA and PAD identification and management in females may improve outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2020.11.034DOI Listing
June 2021

Vascular Complications Increase Hospital Charges and Mortality in Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the United States.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2021 Summer;33(2):397-406. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) who suffer vascular complications frequently accrue additional procedures and costs. We sought to evaluate the effect of ECMO-related vascular complications on hospital charges and in-hospital mortality. Adult discharges involving ECMO from 2004 to 2013 in the National Inpatient Sample were examined. There were 12,636 patients in the cohort. Vascular complications, focusing on arterial complications were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis and procedure codes. A multivariable survey linear regression model using median hospital charges was used to model the effect of vascular complications on charges. We used multivariable survey logistic regression to evaluate the effect of vascular complications on in-hospital mortality. Of the 12,636 patients examined, 6467 (51.2%) had ECMO-related vascular complications. Median charges in patients with vascular complications were $ 477,363 (interquartile range: 258,660-875,823) and were $ 282,298 (interquartile range: 130,030-578,027) without vascular complications. On multivariable analysis, patients with vascular complications had 24% higher median charges than patients without vascular complications (Ratio: 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-1.33; P < 0.0001) and 34% higher odds of experiencing in-hospital mortality than patients without vascular complications (adjusted odds ratio: 1.34; 95% CI:1.08-1.66; P = 0.009). Vascular complications occur in over half of ECMO patients and are associated with an increased risk of high hospital charges and in-hospital mortality. These findings support the need for identification and modification of risk factors for ECMO-related vascular complications. Furthermore, the standardization of protocols using evidence-based measures to mitigate vascular complications may improve overall ECMO outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.semtcvs.2020.09.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7985037PMC
July 2021
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