Publications by authors named "Samanesadat Hosseini"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The natural-based optimization of kojic acid conjugated to different thio-quinazolinones as potential anti-melanogenesis agents with tyrosinase inhibitory activity.

Bioorg Med Chem 2021 Apr 27;36:116044. Epub 2021 Jan 27.

Medicinal and Natural Products Chemistry Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address:

Melanin pigment and melanogenesis are a two-edged sword. Melanin has a radioprotection role while melanogenesis has undesirable effects. Targeting the melanogenesis pathway, a series of kojyl thioether conjugated to different quinazolinone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against mushroom tyrosinase. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their anti-tyrosinase activity and all derivatives displayed better potency than kojic acid as the positive control. In this regard, 5j and 5h as the most active compounds showed an IC value of 0.46 and 0.50 µM, respectively. In kinetic evaluation against tyrosinase, 5j depicted an uncompetitive inhibition pattern. Designed compounds also exhibited mild antioxidant capacity. Moreover, 5j and 5h achieved good potency against the B16F10 cell line to reduce the melanin content, whilst showing limited toxicity against malignant cells. The proposed binding mode of new inhibitors evaluated through molecular docking was consistent with the results of structure-activity relationship analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2021.116044DOI Listing
April 2021

Quinazolinone-dihydropyrano[3,2-b]pyran hybrids as new α-glucosidase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, enzymatic inhibition, docking study and prediction of pharmacokinetic.

Bioorg Chem 2021 Apr 8;109:104703. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

Nano Alvand Company, Avicenna Tech Park, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

A series of new quinazolinone-dihydropyrano[3,2-b]pyran derivatives 10A-L were synthesized by simple chemical reactions and were investigated for inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. New synthesized compounds showed high α-glucosidase inhibition effects in comparison to the standard drug acarbose and were inactive against α-amylase. Among them, the most potent compound was compound 10L (IC value = 40.1 ± 0.6 µM) with inhibitory activity around 18.75-fold more than acarboase (IC value = 750.0 ± 12.5 µM). This compound was a competitive inhibitor into α-glucosidase. Our obtained experimental results were confirmed by docking studies. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the most potent compounds 10L, 10G, and 10N against normal fibroblast cells and in silico druglikeness, ADME, and toxicity prediction of these compounds were also evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioorg.2021.104703DOI Listing
April 2021

Design, synthesis, characterization, enzymatic inhibition evaluations, and docking study of novel quinazolinone derivatives.

Int J Biol Macromol 2021 Feb 19;170:1-12. Epub 2020 Dec 19.

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum, Turkey.

In this study, novel quinazolinone derivatives 7a-n were synthesized and evaluated against metabolic enzymes including α-glycosidase, acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, human carbonic anhydrase I, and II. These compounds exhibited high inhibitory activities in comparison to used standard inhibitors with K values in the range of 19.28-135.88 nM for α-glycosidase (K value for standard inhibitor = 187.71 nM), 0.68-23.01 nM for acetylcholinesterase (K value for standard inhibitor = 53.31 nM), 1.01-29.56 nM for butyrylcholinesterase (K value for standard inhibitor = 58.16 nM), 10.25-126.05 nM for human carbonic anhydrase I (K value for standard inhibitor = 248.18 nM), and 13.46-178.35 nM for human carbonic anhydrase II (K value for standard inhibitor = 323.72). Furthermore, the most potent compounds against each enzyme were selected in order to evaluate interaction modes of these compounds in the active site of the target enzyme. Cytotoxicity assay of the title compounds 7a-n against cancer cell lines MCF-7 and LNCaP demonstrated that these compounds do not show significant cytotoxic effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.12.121DOI Listing
February 2021

Novel quinazolin-sulfonamid derivatives: synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation, and molecular docking studies.

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2020 Nov 23:1-12. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

In the design of novel drugs, the formation of hybrid molecules via the combination of several pharmacophores can give rise to compounds with interesting biochemical profiles. A series of novel quinazolin-sulfonamid derivatives () were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their antidiabetic, anticholinergics, and antiepileptic activity. These synthesized novel quinazolin-sulfonamid derivatives () were found to be effective inhibitor molecules for the α-glycosidase, human carbonic anhydrase I and II (hCA I and hCA II), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme, with Ki values in the range of 100.62 ± 13.68-327.94 ± 58.21 nM for α-glycosidase, 1.03 ± 0.11-14.87 ± 2.63 nM for hCA I, 1.83 ± 0.24-15.86 ± 2.57 nM for hCA II, 30.12 ± 3.81-102.16 ± 13.87 nM for BChE, and 26.16 ± 3.63-88.52 ± 20.11 nM for AChE, respectively. In the last step, molecular docking calculations were made to compare biological activities of molecules against enzymes which are achethylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and α-glycosidase. Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2020.1847193DOI Listing
November 2020

Synthesis and potent antimicrobial activity of CoFeO nanoparticles under visible light.

Heliyon 2020 Oct 8;6(10):e05058. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.

The nanoparticles of Cobalt ferrite are synthesized using polyethylene glycol as a solvent by the solvothermal method in a surfactant-free condition. Nanoparticles that were synthesized were determined by using various techniques such as Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy (DRS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The Scanning electron microscope confirmed the range of spherical nanoparticles in the size of 20-33 nm.An excellent match was observed between the calculated particles size in the X-ray diffraction and electron microscopes results. Furthermore, their antimicrobial efficacy was determined by MIC, MBC, IC50 and disc diffusion method on Gram-negative ( and ) and Gram-positive () bacteria. The results indicated an acceptable bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of this nanoparticles. Additionally, it was seen that by the increase in the concentration of nanoparticles, their antimicrobial property would increase.

Background And Objective: In recent years, antibacterial materials have found a special place to avoid the overuse of antibiotics. In this study, the antibacterial effects of CoFeO nanoparticles on were investigated due to their importance as human pathogens in nosocomial infection.

Methodology: In this study, the antibacterial effects of CoFeO nanoparticles such as MIC, MBC, IC50, and disc diffusion method were examined.

Findings: According to the results, CoFeO nanoparticles exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the bacteria that were examined, especially . The MBC (Minimum Bactericidal Concentration) of CoFeO nanoparticle on , , , was between 0.12-0.48 mg/ml and MIC (Minimum Inhibition Concentration) on these bacteria detected between 0.06-0.24 mg/ml. The least IC50 determined for with a concentration of 0.061 mg/ml. and identified as the most resistant and sensitive bacteria in the disc diffusion method, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e05058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7550927PMC
October 2020

Synthesis, characterization, molecular docking, and biological activities of coumarin-1,2,3-triazole-acetamide hybrid derivatives.

Arch Pharm (Weinheim) 2020 Oct 9;353(10):e2000109. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

Coumarins and their derivatives are receiving increasing attention due to numerous biochemical and pharmacological applications. In this study, a series of novel coumarin-1,2,3-triazole-acetamide hybrids was tested against some metabolic enzymes including α-glycosidase (α-Gly), α-amylase (α-Amy), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), human carbonic anhydrase I (hCA I), and hCA II. The new coumarin-1,2,3-triazole-acetamide hybrids showed K values in the range of 483.50-1,243.04 nM against hCA I, 508.55-1,284.36 nM against hCA II, 24.85-132.85 nM against AChE, 27.17-1,104.36 nM against BChE, 590.42-1,104.36 nM against α-Gly, and 55.38-128.63 nM against α-Amy. The novel coumarin-1,2,3-triazole-acetamide hybrids had effective inhibition profiles against all tested metabolic enzymes. Also, due to the enzyme inhibitory effects of the new hybrids, they are potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as epilepsy, glaucoma, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and leukemia. Additionally, these inhibition effects were compared with standard enzyme inhibitors like acetazolamide (for hCA I and II), tacrine (for AChE and BChE), and acarbose (for α-Gly and α-Amy). Also, those coumarin-1,2,3-triazole-acetamide hybrids with the best inhibition score were docked into the active site of the indicated metabolic enzymes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ardp.202000109DOI Listing
October 2020