Publications by authors named "Samaneh Saffar"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preparation, Optimization and In-Vitro Evaluation of Curcumin-Loaded Niosome@calcium Alginate Nanocarrier as a New Approach for Breast Cancer Treatment.

Biology (Basel) 2021 Feb 26;10(3). Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Department of Engineering, Norfolk state University, Norfolk, VA 23504, USA.

Cancer is one of the most common causes of mortality, and its various treatment methods can have many challenges for patients. As one of the most widely used cancer treatments, chemotherapy may result in diverse side effects. The lack of targeted drug delivery to tumor tissues can raise the possibility of damage to healthy tissues, with attendant dysfunction. In the present study, an optimum formulation of curcumin-loaded niosomes with a calcium alginate shell (AL-NioC) was developed and optimized by a three-level Box-Behnken design-in terms of dimension and drug loading efficiency. The niosomes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. The as-formulated niosomes showed excellent stability for up to 1 month at 4 °C. Additionally, the niosomal formulation demonstrated a pH-dependent release; a slow-release profile in physiological pH (7.4), and a more significant release rate at acidic conditions (pH = 3). Cytotoxicity studies showed high compatibility of AL-NioC toward normal MCF10A cells, while significant toxicity was observed in MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Gene expression studies of the cancer cells showed downregulation of Bcl2, cyclin D, and cyclin E genes, as well as upregulation of P53, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 genes expression following the designed treatment. Flow cytometry studies confirmed a significant enhancement in the apoptosis rate in the presence of AL-NioC in both MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3 cells as compared to other samples. In general, the results of this study demonstrated that-thanks to its biocompatibility toward normal cells-the AL-NioC formulation can efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs to target cancer cells while reducing side effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biology10030173DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996962PMC
February 2021

Niosomal delivery of simvastatin to MDA-MB-231 cancer cells.

Drug Dev Ind Pharm 2020 Sep 28;46(9):1535-1549. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Nanobiotechnology, New Technologies Research Group, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: The objective of this study was to use nano-niosomal formulations to deliver simvastatin as a poor-water soluble drug into breast cancer cells.

Significance: Our study focused on the problem associated with poor water-soluble drugs which have significant biological activity .

Methods: Different niosomal formulations of simvastatin were prepared and characterized in terms of morphology, size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), and release kinetic. Antiproliferative activity and the mechanism were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Moreover, confocal microscopy was employed to analyze the cell uptake of simvastatin loaded niosomes to the cancerous cells.

Results: Size, polydispersity index (PDI), and EE of the best formulation were obtained as 164.8 nm, 0.232, and 97%, respectively. The formulated simvastatin had a spherical shape and showed a slow release profile of the drug after 72 h. Stability data elucidated an increase in mean diameter and PDI which was lower for 4 °C than 25 °C. Confocal microscopy showed the localization of drug loaded niosomes in the cancer cells. The MTT assay revealed both free drug and drug loaded niosomes exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells). Flow cytometry and qPCR analysis revealed drug loaded niosomes exert their cytotoxicity on cancerous cells via regulation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes.

Conclusion: The prepared niosomal simvastatin showed good physicochemical and biological properties than free drug. Our study suggests that niosomal delivery could be considered as a promising strategy for the delivery of poor water-soluble drugs to cancer cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03639045.2020.1810269DOI Listing
September 2020

Biomolecular Corona Dictates Aβ Fibrillation Process.

ACS Chem Neurosci 2018 07 30;9(7):1725-1734. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Pharmacutical Sciences Research Center , Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences , Kermanshah 67145-67346 , Iran.

Amyloid beta (Aβ), which forms toxic oligomers and fibrils in brain tissues of patients with Alzheimer's disease, is broadly used as a model protein to probe the effect of nanoparticles (NPs) on oligomerization and fibrillation processes. However, the majority of the reports in the field have ignored the effect of the biomolecular corona on the fibrillogenesis of the Aβ proteins. The biomolecular corona, which is a layer composed of various types of biomolecules that covers the surface of NPs upon their interaction with biological fluids, determines the biological fates of NPs. Therefore, during in vivo interaction of NPs with Aβ protein, what the Aβ actually "sees" is the human plasma and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomolecular-coated NPs rather than the pristine surface of NPs. Here, to mimic the in vivo effects of therapeutic NPs as antifibrillation agents, we probed the effects of a biomolecular corona derived from human CSF and/or plasma on Aβ fibrillation. The results demonstrated that the type of biomolecular corona can dictate the inhibitory or acceleratory effect of NPs on Aβ and Aβ fibrillation processes. More specifically, we found that the plasma biomolecular-corona-coated gold NPs, with sphere and rod shapes, has less inhibitory effect on Aβ fibrillation kinetics compared with CSF biomolecular-corona-coated and pristine NPs. Opposite results were obtained for Aβ peptide, where the pristine NPs accelerated the Aβ fibrillation process, whereas corona-coated ones demonstrated an inhibitory effect. In addition, the CSF biomolecular corona had less inhibitory effect than those obtained from plasma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acschemneuro.8b00076DOI Listing
July 2018

Cell-imprinted substrates act as an artificial niche for skin regeneration.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2014 Aug 10;6(15):13280-92. Epub 2014 Jul 10.

Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine (SATiM), Tehran University of Medical Sciences , P.O. Box 14177-55469, Tehran, Iran.

Bioinspired materials can mimic the stem cell environment and modulate stem cell differentiation and proliferation. In this study, biomimetic micro/nanoenvironments were fabricated by cell-imprinted substrates based on mature human keratinocyte morphological templates. The data obtained from atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that the keratinocyte-cell-imprinted poly(dimethylsiloxane) casting procedure could imitate the surface morphology of the plasma membrane, ranging from the nanoscale to the macroscale, which may provide the required topographical cell fingerprints to induce differentiation. Gene expression levels of the genes analyzed (involucrin, collagen type I, and keratin 10) together with protein expression data showed that human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) seeded on these cell-imprinted substrates were driven to adopt the specific shape and characteristics of keratinocytes. The observed morphology of the ADSCs grown on the keratinocyte casts was noticeably different from that of stem cells cultivated on the stem-cell-imprinted substrates. Since the shape and geometry of the nucleus could potentially alter the gene expression, we used molecular dynamics to probe the effect of the confining geometry on the chain arrangement of simulated chromatin fibers in the nuclei. The results obtained suggested that induction of mature cell shapes onto stem cells can influence nucleus deformation of the stem cells followed by regulation of target genes. This might pave the way for a reliable, efficient, and cheap approach of controlling stem cell differentiation toward skin cells for wound healing applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am503045bDOI Listing
August 2014