Publications by authors named "Samagra Jain"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Messenger RNA-based vaccines: Past, present, and future directions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2021 Oct 9;179:114000. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA. Electronic address:

mRNA vaccines have received major attention in the fight against COVID-19. Formulations from companies such as Moderna and BioNTech/Pfizer have allowed us to slowly ease the social distancing measures, mask requirements, and lockdowns that have been prevalent since early 2020. This past year's focused work on mRNA vaccines has catapulted this technology to the forefront of public awareness and additional research pursuits, thus leading to new potential for bionanotechnology principles to help drive further innovation using mRNA. In addition to alleviating the burden of COVID-19, mRNA vaccines could potentially provide long-term solutions all over the world for diseases ranging from influenza to AIDS. Herein, we provide a brief commentary based on the history and development of mRNA vaccines in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, we address current research using the technology and future directions of mRNA vaccine research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2021.114000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8502079PMC
October 2021

CRISPR/Cas systems to overcome challenges in developing the next generation of T cells for cancer therapy.

Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2020 21;158:17-35. Epub 2020 Jul 21.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; Departments of Pediatrics and Surgery, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA. Electronic address:

Genetically engineered immune cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or modified T cell receptors (TCR) have demonstrated their potential as a potent class of new cancer therapeutic strategy. Despite the clinical success of autologous CD19 CAR T cells in hematological malignancies, allogeneic T cells exhibit many advantages over their autologous counterparts and have recently gathered widespread attention due to the emergence of multiplex genome editing techniques, particularly CRISPR/Cas systems. Furthermore, genetically engineered T cells face a host of major challenges in solid tumors that are not as significant for blood cancers such as T cell targeted delivery, target specificity, proliferation, persistence, and the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We take this opportunity to analyze recent strategies to develop allogeneic T cells, specifically in consideration of CRISPR/Cas and its delivery systems for multiplex gene editing. Additionally, we discuss the current methods used to delivery CRISPR/Cas systems for immunotherapeutic applications, and the challenges to continued development of novel delivery systems. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of the major challenges that genetically engineered T cells face in solid tumors along with the most recent strategies to overcome these barriers, with an emphasis on CRISPR-based approaches. We illustrate the synergistic prospects for how the combination of synthetic biology and immune-oncology could pave the way for designing the next generation of precision cancer therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2020.07.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7736063PMC
September 2021
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