Publications by authors named "Sama Aghababayan"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Higher Dietary Inflammatory Index Scores are Associated with Increased Odds of Benign Breast Diseases in a Case-Control Study.

J Inflamm Res 2020 5;13:61-69. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Purpose: Dietary inflammatory index (DII) is a new tool for assessing the inflammatory potential of diet. Since there is no study that has investigated the association of DII and benign breast diseases (BBD), the aim of our study was to compare DII scores in patients with and without BBD.

Methods: One hundred and eleven (111) subjects with BBD and 104 healthy women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer affiliated with the Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research were enrolled in a case-control study. Dietary data collected using a 168‑item validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Energy-adjusted DII was calculated based on FFQ. Socio demographic data were collected by interview. In addition, physical activity was measured by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Weight, height and waist circumference were also measured.

Results: After adjustment for multiple confounding variables, participants at the highest tertile of DII had increased OR for BBD (OR=1.7, 95% CI=0.75-3.95) (P-trend =0.04).

Conclusion: The increased chance of BBD was suggested with a higher consumption of diets with inflammatory potential. However, this result should be interpreted with caution as OR was not statistically significant. Interventional studies are warranted to elucidate the role of inflammatory diets in the development of BBD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JIR.S232157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7008174PMC
February 2020

Dietary Phytochemical Index and Benign Breast Diseases: A Case-Control Study.

Nutr Cancer 2020 2;72(6):1067-1073. Epub 2019 Sep 2.

Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

: Dietary phytochemical index (DPI) is an inexpensive method for estimating the amounts of phytochemicals in foods. No study has investigated the association of DPI and benign breast diseases (BBD). Our study aimed to compare DPI in patients with BBD and the control group. This is a case-control study of 115 subjects with BBD and 116 healthy women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer affiliated with Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research. Energy-adjusted DPI was calculated based on data collected from 168-item validated food frequency questionnaire. Sociodemographic data, physical activity, and anthropometric measures such as body weight, height, and waist circumference were determined. After adjustment for age, estrogen therapy, family history of breast disease, intake of dietary supplement, menopause status, waist circumference and physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) of BBD across the energy-adjusted DPI quartiles decreased significantly (OR = 0.3, 95%CI = 0.12-0.93) (‑trend = 0.02). We found that higher DPI score is related to lower BBD OR. This simple method may be used for the improvement of dietary intake to prevent BBD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2019.1658795DOI Listing
September 2019

Oral carnitine supplementation influences mental health parameters and biomarkers of oxidative stress in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Gynecol Endocrinol 2017 Jun 21;33(6):442-447. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

e Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences , Kashan , Iran.

Introduction: Limited data are available assessing the effects of oral carnitine supplementation on mental health parameters and biomarkers of oxidative stress of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).This study was designed to determine the effects of oral carnitine supplementation on mental health parameters and biomarkers of oxidative stress in women with PCOS.

Methods: In the current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 60 patients diagnosed with PCOS were randomized to take either 250 mg carnitine supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks.

Results: After 12 weeks' intervention, compared with the placebo, carnitine supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in Beck Depression Inventory total score (-2.7 ± 2.3 versus -0.2 ± 0.7, p < 0.001), General Health Questionnaire scores (-6.9 ± 4.9 versus -0.9 ± 1.5, p < 0.001) and Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale scores (-8.7 ± 5.9 versus -1.2 ± 2.9, p = 0.001). In addition, changes in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (+84.1 ± 151.8 versus +4.6 ± 64.5 mmol/L, p = 0.01), malondialdehyde (MDA) (-0.4 ± 1.0 versus  +0.5 ± 1.5 μmol/L, p = 0.01) and MDA/TAC ratio (-0.0005 ± 0.0010 versus +0.0006 ± 0.0019, p = 0.003) in the supplemented group were significantly different from the changes in these indicators in the placebo group.

Conclusions: Overall, our study demonstrated that carnitine supplementation for 12 weeks among patients with PCOS had favorable effects on parameters of mental health and biomarkers of oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09513590.2017.1290071DOI Listing
June 2017