Dr. Samuel P. Abraham, DHA, MS, RN - Bethel University School of Nursing - Associate Professor

Dr. Samuel P. Abraham

DHA, MS, RN

Bethel University School of Nursing

Associate Professor

Mishawaka, Indiana | United States

Main Specialties: Nursing, Psychiatry

Additional Specialties: Psychiatric Nursing, Evidence-based Practice, Ethics

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5635-0769


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Dr. Samuel P. Abraham, DHA, MS, RN - Bethel University School of Nursing - Associate Professor

Dr. Samuel P. Abraham

DHA, MS, RN

Introduction

Dr. Abraham completed his registered nurse (RN) program from Andrews University (Berrien Springs, MI) in 1989; his Master of Science (MS) degree is also from Andrews University nursing division. He completed his Doctor of Health Administration (DHA) degree from the University of Phoenix, AZ, in 2012. His research focused on factors contributing to patient falls in psychiatric inpatient units. His work experience includes psychiatric staff nurse, teaching psychiatric nursing in the classroom and clinical setting, and manager of psychiatric program.
He was the past president and currently a member of the Association of Behavioral Healthcare (ABH) in Michigan. His published journals include Technological Trends in Health Care: Electronic Health Record (2010); Health Care Manager Journal. Acquisition and Allocation of Human, Financial, and Physical Resources in the Health Care System (2011); Health Care Manager Journal. Fall Prevention Program: Conceptual Framework (2011); Health Care Manager Journal, and 30-plus articles in various national and international journals.

Sam likes writing, teaching, fishing, traveling, grilling, gardening, and most of all being with his family. Sam currently is the associate professor, teaching psychiatric nursing, ethics, and nursing research in Bethel College School of Nursing.

Primary Affiliation: Bethel University School of Nursing - Mishawaka, Indiana , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2009 - Aug 2012
University of Phoenix
Doctor of Health Administration
School of Advanced Studies
Jan 1989 - May 1992
Andrews University
RN, MS
Department of Nursing

Experience

Jun 2017
Associate Professor of Nursing
Jan 2003 - Jan 2010
Lake Michigan College
Faculty
Nursing
Jan 1989 - Jan 2010
Lakeland HealthCare
Manager
Psychiatric
Jan 2001 - Jan 2009
Andrews University
Assistant Professor
Nursing
Sep 2013
Western Michigan University Bronson School of Nursing
Adjunct Faculty
School of Nursing
Aug 2011
Bethel University School of Nursing
Associate Professor of Nursing
School of Nursing

Publications

82Publications

1100Reads

641Profile Views

The lived experiences of students and faculty of a Christian college who participated in a short-term international mission trip

Davis, Lechlitner, Standifer, Abraham & Gillum

TEACH Journal of Christian Education

Short-term international mission trips (STIMTs) are increasing in popularity. Likewise, educators and health care workers are increasingly concerned with obtaining an understanding that improves culturally competent care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the lived experiences of participants of a Christian college who travelled on a short-term international mission trip (STIMT). One openended inquiry guided the interviews: How would you describe your experience as a participant who travelled on a STIMT? An in-depth, oneon-one interview of participants occurred until data saturation was reached. Colaizzi’s strategy was used to analyze and organize the data. Leininger’s sunrise model was used to guide this study. Themes that emerged from this study included cultural adaptation, relationships, spiritual factors, and personal gain.

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December 2019
1 Read

Association between Sleep and Delirium in the Pediatric Intensive Care Patients

Shaelyn M. Atkins, Anna M. Schoenhals, Samuel P. Abraham

IJSRM

Background: Admission into the hospital pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) could be stressful for the child, as well as his or her family. Stress can affect many aspects of a child’s life, especially his or her sleep quality. One of the common complications of a patient’s PICU experience is the development of delirium. Delirium has many additional complications such as lengthened hospital stays, posttraumatic stress disorder, and negative long-term neurocognitive effects. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sleep and delirium in children in the PICU. Method: The method used was to use a systematic review of the literature and collect data on the association between sleep and delirium in the PICU. The patient, intervention, comparison, outcome, and time (PICOT) question was: Are PICU patients who have a lack of sleep at increased risk for developing delirium when compared with PICU patients who received adequate sleep? Conclusion: Upon conclusion of the literature review, results indicated that while a PICU patient’s amount of sleep and his or her development of delirium may be related, there is not enough evidence to confirm the association. In addition, more research. needs to be conducted to further evaluate the effects of varying amounts of sleep in a PICU patient.

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December 2019
2 Reads

Emergency Room Nurses’ Views on Bedside Shift Reporting

Crystal L. Foster, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum (2019). Emergency Room Nurses‟ Views on Bedside Shift Reportin, International Journal of Studies in Nursing; 4(4), 55-69. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v4i4.67

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Bedside shift reporting is a form of communication used by nurses to communicate with each other regarding the patient plan of care. Although bedside shift reporting is required by The Joint Commission and is a required hospital policy, there are inconsistencies in the emergency room nurses performing the task. The purpose of this study was to describe emergency room nurses’ views on bedside shift reporting. A qualitative research study was conducted using a semi-structured interview process. Colaizzi’s data collection and analysis strategy were used to determine emerging themes. Peplau’s interpersonal relations and Benner’s novice to expert theories were used to help guide this study. Fifteen emergency room nurses were interviewed, and seven themes emerged from the data collected. Three themes, nurse accountability, nurse introduction, and patient involvement were identified as benefits of bedside shift reporting. Four themes, bedside shift report not done, emergency room situations, emergency room environment, and time factors were identified as challenges of bedside shift reporting. The study helped to determine the need for additional educational opportunities for the emergency room nurses, emergency department, and the organization to increase the consistency of the reporting process. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v4i4.677

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December 2019
3 Reads

Nurses' Lived Experiences of Faith-Based Short-Term Medical Mission Trips.

Journal of Christian nursing : a quarterly publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/31464802

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August 2019
5 Reads

College Students’ Caffeine Intake Habits and Their Perception of Its Effects

Andrea R. Van Beek, Megan E. Weier, Kassandra R. Williams, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum (2019). College Students’ Caffeine Intake Habits and Their Perception of Its Effects. Journal of Education and Development; Vol. 3, No. 2

Journal of Education and Development

Background: Caffeine is a highly used stimulant on college campuses. The prevalence of energy drinks, especially among the younger generations is cause for concern. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the caffeine intake habits of college students and the perception of its effects. Method: The method used was quantitative, cross-sectional, with a descriptive design. The two research questions were: (1) What are the caffeine intake habits of college students? (2) What are the perceptions of the effects of caffeine use among college students? This study was conducted at a college campus in northern Indiana, USA. Participants included 120 male and female students ages 18 years and older. The health belief model was used to guide this study. Results: The study indicated that while caffeine is a commonly used stimulant across campus, overuse was not revealed. Many students reported being able to go 48-72 hours without caffeine and not experiencing withdrawal symptoms when going without it. However, most students do report that they perceive a need to decrease their use of caffeine, as caffeine use has increased since attending college. Conclusion: The review of the literature indicated that the use of caffeine was higher in younger people. However, the research completed as a part of this study from college students indicated that caffeine overuse may not be as prevalent as previously thought.

http://dx.doi.org/10.20849/jed.v3i2.607

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July 2019
3 Reads

College Students’ Perceptions of Stress and Coping Mechanisms

Kelsey M. Gallagher, Tiara R. Jones, Nicole V. Landrosh, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum (2019)

Journal of Education and Development

Background: Typical college students experience stressors every day. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine college students’ perceptions of stress and coping mechanisms. Method: A quantitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used to assess students’ perception of stress and coping mechanisms. To collect data, a survey tool was used to answer 6 demographic and twenty-five survey items on a 4-point Likert-type scale. Two central research questions guided the study: (1) What are college students’ perceptions of stress? and (2) What are college students’ perceptions of coping mechanisms? Results: The responses to these questions were analyzed and the implications are discussed. Conclusion: College students agree that college life is stressful and that their level of stress increases significantly before exams. In addition, students reported that expectations to excel in classes cause additional stress. Students reported a variety of coping mechanisms, including listening to music, socializing with friends/family, and sitting alone in a quiet place.

http://dx.doi.org/10.20849/jed.v3i2.600

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June 2019
24 Reads

Factors that Contribute to Nursing and Medical Students‟ Perceptions of the Nurse-Physician Relationship

Kathryn G. Conover, Michaela E. Behrens, Emily N. Usenick, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Background: Biases and preconceptions regarding future working relationships have the potential to impact professional interactions. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the factors that contribute to nursing and medical students‟ perceptions of the nurse-physician relationship. Method: This was a qualitative, phenomenological, explorative study with a descriptive design. Eight nursing students and eight medical students were interviewed for this study and themes were carefully extracted from their responses. A series of open-ended questions were asked that were intended to elicit honest, thoughtful responses regarding how they view the other profession, their relationship, and thoughts on the quality of future professional collaboration. Social identity theory was used as the conceptual framework to guide this study. Themes were then extracted from the interviews. Results: The main themes found were in the areas of attitudes and behaviors. Nursing students had more positive than negative comments about interdisciplinary attitudes, but they had slightly more negative comments regarding interdisciplinary behaviors. Medical students commented far more on interdisciplinary behaviors than on attitudes, with both categories turning out more positive than negative. Specific subthemes included medical students‟ concern with sexism against female physicians and their high degree of concern over how interdisciplinary relationships affect the patient. Nursing students believed the relationship would be respectful depending on the unit. However, most of them expressed concern with how negative behaviors impact the patient. Conclusion: Learning standout themes from nursing and medical students‟ perceptions of their future working relationships can aid in finding barriers that can be addressed. Future research would be beneficial to discover themes on a larger scale.

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June 2019
4 Reads

Factors Determining the Choice of Vegetarian vs. Meat-Eating Diets

Alexie C. Maxwell, Arianna M. Smith, Emily R. Thomas, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Background: There are various opinions of what eating healthy looks like, and it has become a frequent topic of discussion among young adults. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining the choice of vegetarian vs. meat-eating diet. Method: This study was a qualitative phenomenological study with a descriptive design that was conducted at a college in northern Indiana area using one-on-one interviews. The sample size was 16 individuals, 8 who use the vegetarian diet, and 8 who are meat-eaters. Pender’s health promotion model was used to guide this study. Results: There were 9 themes that emerged, of which 5 were vegan/vegetarian and 4 were meat-eaters. The vegetarian and vegan themes were limitation of the diet (1), health effects (2), confusion and stigma about diet (3), reasons for choosing this diet (4), and more conscious of what they eat (5). The meat-eating themes were choices (1), health effects (2), mocking and ridiculing (3), and workout (4). Conclusion: Overall, meat-eaters had more choices in their diet and vegetarians and vegans struggled with limitations. They discussed mocking or stigma about their diets as well as health effects. The need for further studies on this topic is evident from the literature review.

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v4i3.598

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June 2019
5 Reads

DEPERSONALIZATION/DEREALIZATION DISORDER: JENNIFER'S RECOVERY STORY

Jennifer L. Jones, and Samuel P. Abraham. (2019). “DEPERSONALIZATION/DEREALIZATION DISORDER: JENNIFER’S RECOVERY STORY.” International Journal of Research - Granthaalayah, 7(5), 66-70. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3234685.

International Journal of Research -GRANTHAALAYAH

Depersonalization/derealization disorder is not commonly known. A nursing student experienced depersonalization/derealization attack just as she was taking her pharmacology examination at the end of the first year of nursing school. She was brought up in a supportive family. She reports no history of abuse or substance use. She succeeded well in high school and have had no serious panic episodes throughout her childhood and teen years. Jennifer tells the story of how on April 24th, 2017 her life changed.

https://zenodo.org/record/3234685

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May 2019
8 Reads

Challenges of Treatment and Living with the Stigma Related to Paranoid Personality Disorder

Citation: Samuel P. Abraham et al. Ijsrm.Human, 2019; Vol. 12 (3): 51-64.

International Journal of Science and Research Metthodology

Background: Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is characterized by inflexible distrust and suspiciousness of others not supported by evidence. They fear others are out to get them. Stigma related to this disorder includes being labeled as mistrustful and misunderstood. This is not a new addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual; however, adequate research is lacking. Purpose: This paper aims to address the stigma of the diagnosis PPD, challenges patients face, and to recognize the challenges of treatment for this disorder. Method: This literature review examines studies on PPD and assessing the contributing factors for the diagnosis, along with analyzing a case study. It discusses challenges faced by health care providers for providing treatment. Conclusion: Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medications for the treatment of PPD. People with this disorder tend to refuse treatment. Interventions to help individuals during an inpatient stay include opening medications in front of the individual and providing pre-packaged foods. Careful diagnosis is vital for individuals to receive any help. Antianxiety, antidepressants, and antipsychotics may be helpful in subsiding symptoms.

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May 2019
7 Reads

College Students’ Perceptions of Influenza Vaccination and Childhood Immunizations

Samantha E. Czyz, Janelle Y. Miller, Hope M. Muniz, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum (2019). College Students’ Perceptions of Influenza Vaccination and Childhood Immunization, International Journal of Studies in Nursing; Vol. 4, No. 2, 66-75. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v4i2.582

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Background: After reviewing the literature on flu vaccinations and childhood immunizations, it was concluded that participation in these preventative measures is beneficial to health in increasing the chances of protection from specific diseases. Further studies show that not all college students receive them or plan to have their prospective children vaccinated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine college students’ perception of influenza vaccination and childhood immunizations. Method: This was a quantitative, non-experimental study with a descriptive design using two open-ended questions to enhance data collection. A total of 120 college students were recruited to participate in this study. The research questions were: “What are college students’ perceptions of influenza vaccination?” and “What are college students’ perceptions of childhood immunizations?” The health belief model was used to guide the study. Results/Conclusion: Survey results showed that many students in a Christian college believe immunization is effective and plan to immunize their future children. However, a few students stated a desire to learn more about immunization. Keywords: college students, perceptions, immunizations, influenza, childhood vaccinations

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v4i2.582

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May 2019
6 Reads

Relationships effecting college students' perception of family influence impacting their health and lifestyle

Nicholas, Kayla J.; Soptich, Kayla M.; Tyson, Amy; Perry, Graeme; Abraham, Sam Dr.; and Gillum, Deborah (2018) "Relationships Effecting College Students’ Perception of Family Influence Impacting their Health and Lifestyle," TEACH Journal of Christian Education: Vol. 12 : Iss. 2 , Article 7. Availabl

TEACH Journal of Christian Education

Abstract The purpose of this cross-sectional, non experimental descriptive design study was to determine college students’ perception of family influence impacting their health and lifestyle. The sample included 120 college students in a faith-based institution and each student completed a Likert-type survey (4-point agreement scale) that investigated their perception of health, and the degree of influence peers and family had on their health. This second data analysis reports correlations between variables and group differences related to health perceptions and behaviours. The strongest correlation is between ‘family demonstration of positive health habits’ and ‘personal health practices being like my families’ (r = 0.671, p < 0.01), amoderate relationship supported by other weaker positive correlations to specific health outcomes. Negative correlations between ‘my friends display more positive health habits than family’ and both ‘family has influenced my idea of health’ and ‘my health practices are similar to my family’ indicate the potential for other contextual factors to effect family impact. While differences relating to health influence and outcomes between groups formed by age, gender, ethnicity, family structure and religion were found, the variable related to most healthy lifestyle transmission elements was ‘My family demonstrates positive health habits’. Recommendations supporting improved societal health are offered, together with suggestions for further research. Group classifications that are fixed but might inform interactions with elements of cohorts are identified, together with group memberships which might be changed to enhance health options. Caution in the generalisation of these findings is advised due to the explained limitations of this study.

https://research.avondale.edu.au/teach/vol12/iss2/7

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2018
5 Reads

Faith-Based College Students’ Perception of Medical and Recreational Use of Marijuana and its Health Effects

Brown, Bontrager, Westmeyer, Abraham, & Gillum (2018).

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

ABSTRACT Background: The literature review revealed that the legalization of marijuana and the use of the drug within the college-aged population was a controversial topic. There was an ongoing discussion about the effects of marijuana on the body as well as effects on college students' performance. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions regarding the medical and recreational use of marijuana and its health effects among students in a faith-based college. Method: This was a quantitative, cross-sectional, non-experimental study with a descriptive design. One hundred thirty-five participants completed the demographic and 13-item surveys. The health belief model was used to guide this research study. Results: In alignment with the literature, the participants agreed that marijuana could cause learning disabilities and mental health problems but disagreed with marijuana being extremely dangerous. Overall, the participants were in favor of the medical use of marijuana for adults but not for children. The majority of participants (M=3.45, SD= 1.08) agreed that they were neutral regarding the recreational use of marijuana. Conclusion: There was an array of both positive and negative perceptions from students on the college campus. Predominantly, the views of young people have become more accepting of the use of marijuana. Keywords: medical marijuana, recreational marijuana, marijuana use in college students, legalization of marijuana, health effects of marijuana

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October 2018
13 Reads

Optimizing Health Outcomes through Employee Wellness Programs

Samuel P. Abraham, & Brooke Whittaker (2018). Optimizing Health Outcomes through Employee Wellness Programs. International Journal of Science and Research Methodology, 10(3), 168-175.

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

Background: Lack of exercise and poor dietary habits are significant causes of employee illness; they result in increased costs for both the employer and employee. Employee wellness programs should not be a luxury but a necessity in the workplace. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to espouse the optimization of health outcomes through employee wellness programs. Method: The method was a review of the pertinent literature using the keywords: Employee assistance programs (EAP), health outcomes, return on investment (ROI), employee wellness, and healthcare costs. Result: Return on investment is positive not only monetarily but also in increasing the value of retaining qualified individuals, improving morale, employee satisfaction, and job productivity. Conclusion: A wellness program is cost-effective and is likely to improve health and decrease health care expenses.

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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September 2018
14 Reads

Initial Experiences of Pre-Licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing Students with High-Fidelity Simulations

Samuel P. Abraham et al. Ijsrm.Human, 2018; Vol. 10 (3): 57-74.

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

ABSTRACT Aim: The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the initial experiences of pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students with high-fidelity simulations. Background: High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is increasing in nursing education. Improvement in critical thinking, improved prioritization of activities, active learning, and assessment of student learning in a non-threatening practice environment are expected with HFS. Method: This was a qualitative study. The study occurred at a private college in northern Indiana that began using HFS in the same academic year. The data were collected through interviews of 18 students. Results: Altogether, 7 themes emerged from the data analysis. Themes had negative, neutral, and positive characteristics. Conclusion: Nursing students new to HFS experiences could be overwhelmed with HFS scenarios and react emotionally in their initial participation. Therefore, adequate orientation is essential before exposing students to HFS simulation for learning purposes, and debriefing must be available at the end of all sessions.

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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September 2018
16 Reads

The Appearance of the Nurse and Perceived Professionalism

Nikki L. Wills, Brittany Wilson, Eva B. Woodcock, Samuel P. Abraham & Deborah R. Gillum (2018). Appearance of nurses and perceived professionalism. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(3). 30-40.

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Background: After completing a literature review on the topic of appearance and professionalism a knowledge gap was identified, relating to how individuals perceive professionalism based on appearance. First impressions are how patients form opinions of their nurses. Professionalism is influenced by many variables, such as hair, make-up, uniform, behavior, and image. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of a nurse’s appearance and projected professionalism. Method: A total of 120 students volunteered to participate in the study. The research question was: “How do college students perceive the professional appearance of the nurse?” This was a quantitative, cross-sectional, non-experimental study with a descriptive design. A qualitative question was also asked to complement the quantitative data. The survey contained 3 demographic questions and 18 items based on the participant’s perception of the perceived professionalism using the given images. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Orem’s theory of self-care was used to guide this study. Results: The results confirmed the complex nature of the nursing image. Participants perceived a nurse who took extra time to improve appearance to be professional, trustworthy and least lazy. A not so prepared nurse was perceived to lack confidence and also to be less compassionate. Keywords: professionalism and appearance, nurse appearance and professionalism, professional nurses, nursing attire, self-care

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September 2018
14 Reads

College Students’ Perception of Family Influence Impacting their Health and Lifestyle

Nicholas, Kayla J.; Soptich, Kayla M.; Tyson, Amy; Abraham, Samuel P.; Perry, Graeme; and Gillum, Deborah R. (2018) "College Students’ Perception of Family Influence Impacting their Health and Lifestyle," TEACH Journal of Christian Education: Vol. 12 : Iss. 1 , Article 10. Available at: https://rese

TEACH Journal of Christian Education

Abstract Family influence affects the entire family, especially children, adolescents and even young adults once they leave home. The purpose of this study was to determine college students’ perception of family influence impacting their health and lifestyle. This was a cross-sectional, non-experimental study with a descriptive design that used social learning theory to inform and guide the process. The study included 120 college students in a faith-based institution. Each student completed a Likert-type survey (4-point agreement scale) that pertained to their perception of health, and the degree of influence peers and family have on their health. The data analysis showed that respondents are in most agreement (M = 3.34, SD = 0.615) that “family has influenced my idea of health”, 94.2% indicating their agreement. Three reliable factors and scales - Family Influence (FI) (α = 0.764), Positive Family Impacts (PFI) (α = 0.679) and Negative Impacts (NI) α = 0.613) - were established. Most students indicated agreement with perceiving FI (54.2%) and PFI (58%) with low frequencies of disagreement (19.2% and 14.1% respectively). Most disagreed with perceiving NI (61.7%), but 11.7% agreed they experienced negative health impacts. A weak to moderate positive association between FI and PFI (r = 0.334), a moderate but negative correlation between FI and NI (r = -0.429), and a very weak negative correlation between PFI and NI (-0.242) emerged on analysis. Some statistically significant differences in the mean scales for groups defined by four demographic variables - age, gender, family type and religion, but not ethnicity, were confirmed. The general importance of family health education as a integrative public health potential and contributor to student wellbeing, is asserted. The importance of the contribution of this study to Christian education is the known dependence of effective learning experiences (including spirituality) on student wellbeing.

https://research.avondale.edu.au/teach/vol12/iss1/10

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August 2018
17 Reads

Nurse Competencies and Optimization of Patient Outcomes: The Synergy Model

Sobaski & Abraham (2018)

IJSRM Human Journals

ABSTRACT Problem: An ideal nurse-patient assignment framework is non-existent. There is no formal system in place to match nurse competencies with patient clinical severity indicators. Purpose: The purpose of this literature review was to identify acuity rating models that could be used to match patient care characteristics with nurse competencies. Method: A review of the literature was conducted using the EBSCOhost health search engine, which included databases from Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Results: The Synergy Model supported the use of an acuity rating system that considers the complexity of the patient, the patient needs, and the nurse’s ability to meet those needs. The outcomes were positive for patient outcomes, patient, staff, and healthcare provider satisfaction. Keywords: Acuity tool and medical-surgical unit, failure to rescue and nurse competencies, competencies for nurses and evidence-based practice, synergy model, nurse-patient assignment model

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July 2018
12 Reads

Mediterranean Diet and Reducing the Risk of Cancer: A Literature Review

Havens, J., & Abraham, S. P. (2018). Mediterranean Diet and Reducing the Risk of Cancer: A Literature Review. International Journal of Science and Research Methodology, 10(1), 30-39

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

ABSTRACT Background: The traditional Mediterranean Diet (MD) is thought to be associated with a reduced risk of different types of health issues, including cancer. However, the research varies from study to study. Purpose: The intent of this paper is to review the components which make up the traditional MD and discuss the findings of several European studies which target the effectiveness of the MD in reducing the risk of cancer in adults. Method: This literature review is comprised of meta-analyses, cohort studies, and case-control studies published from 2016 to 2018. Findings: Each study evaluated the effectiveness of the MD in relationship to the risk of cancer. Dependent upon the type and location of cancer, the findings varied. With pancreatic and lung cancers, it was determined there was insufficient evidence to support an inverse relationship with the MD. However, a reduced risk of cancer was reported with adherence to the MD in the studies reviewing nasopharyngeal, endometrial, and breast cancers. In adults, adherence to the MD did not decrease the risk of pancreatic or lung cancers but was found to reduce the risk of nasopharyngeal, endometrial and breast cancers. Conclusion: Evidence collected in these studies can be used by medical staff, including nurses, in educating the adult population of the efficacy of reducing different types of cancer by adhering to the MD. Keywords: Mediterranean Diet, Cancer, Implications of Mediterranean Diet, Traditional Mediterranean Diet, Diet and Risk of Cancer

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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July 2018
20 Reads

Nurses’ Perspectives on Patient and Visitor Violence: A Qualitative Study

Lannette Henderson, Brittany Kamp, Keri Niedbalski, Samuel P. Abraham, & Deborah R. Gillum (2018). Nurses’ Perspectives on Patient and Visitor Violence: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Studies in Nursing; Vol. 3, No. 2; 117-126

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i2.427

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July 2018
24 Reads

Night Shift Work and Its Health Effects on Nurses.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2017 Oct/Dec;36(4):347-353

Author Affiliations: Intermediate Care Center (Ms Books) and Palliative Care (Mr Coody), Elkhart General Hospital, IN; Department of Anesthesia, Wentworth Douglas Hospital (Mr Kauffman), Dover, NH; and School of Nursing, Bethel College (Dr Abraham), Mishakawa, IN.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HCM.0000000000000177DOI Listing
July 2018
66 Reads

The Social Aspect of Soup Kitchens

Abraham, S. P. (2018). The social aspects of soup kitchens. International Journal of Science and Research Methodology, 9(3), 72-78.

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

Background: Social institutions such as soup kitchens are the primary food source for the majority of people who are homeless. Purpose: The central research question was: What are the concerns of people who frequently visit the soup kitchen? What conversations and observations are noted around the table? Other motives for research included finding the type of people using the soup kitchen, their culture, and societal needs. Method: The study involves observation of participants in a soup kitchen in the South-Western Michigan region and recording (taking notes by hand) of the conversations. No participation or interaction with the participants occurred. An effort was made to be as unobtrusive as possible during the observation. The attempt was not made to verify or confirm the accuracy of what the participants said about themselves. Findings: One would assume the primary concern of people who visit the soup kitchen is to obtain food; however, once people are sitting at the table eating food, the subjects of conversation among individuals is wide-ranging. Findings indicate that other than eating a meal, people seem to enjoy socializing with others.

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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May 2018
21 Reads

College Students’ Breakfast Habits and the Perception of its Health Effects

College Students’ Breakfast Habits

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore breakfast habits and the perception of its health effects among college students. Background: Eating breakfast yields energy, increases concentration, and reduces obesity; however, students rarely make time for breakfast. Students miss the opportunity to enjoy better health from eating breakfast regularly. Participants: Participants were 116 students age 18 and older in a college situated in Northern Indiana, USA. Method: This is a quantitative, cross-sectional study with a descriptive design. Results: Perceptions did not always match with habits. Students seemed to skip breakfast even though they admit it helps with concentration. They agree that it is important to eat before a test. Time was the biggest barrier to eating breakfast in the morning. Most students preferred extra sleeping time in the morning. Conclusion: Most college students lack the motivation and time management skills to include breakfast into their diet, thus repudiating themselves of the opportunity to be healthier, and increase school performance. Further interventions should focus on time management and seeking to work smarter.

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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May 2018
18 Reads

Nurses’ Awareness Regarding Human Trafficking

Ramnauth, T., Benitez, M., Logan, B., Abraham, S. P., & Gillum, D. (2018). Nurses' awareness regarding human trafficking. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(2), 76-87. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v3i2.389

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Problem: A review of the literature indicated that human trafficking is a worldwide problem and not all nurses in the healthcare setting were adequately trained to identify and care for human trafficking victims. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to further explore nurses’ awareness regarding human trafficking. Method: This quantitative, cross-sectional, non-experimental study with a descriptive design, studied the issue by administering a survey to nurses actively working in the field. The theoretical framework of forced labor and Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory were used to guide the study. The data were collected using SurveyMonkey®, an Internet-based confidential data-collection tool. The survey contained eight demographic questions and sixteen Likert-type statements. The researchers obtained personal email addresses and used Facebook contacts to send out the survey initially. In this study, a Snowball sampling was used to obtain nurse participants. Results: A total of 166 responses were received from nurses across the United States. The results confirmed that there is a lack of awareness among nurses about human trafficking. An increase in both training and education amongst nurses could increase the number of victims, which go unnoticed, being saved or provided with assistance. Nurses also must be more self-aware about the patients they are encountering and be more observant of signs that look suspicious. The most agreed upon statement by participants was that counseling should be available to people who are affected by human trafficking (M = 3.75, SD = 0.48). Keywords: human trafficking, sex trafficking, health care professionals, nurses, victim, preparation, awareness, identification

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i2.389

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May 2018
18 Reads

A Correlational Study of Spiritual Well-being and Depression in the Adult Cancer Patient.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2017 Apr/Jun;36(2):164-172

Author Affiliations: Bethel College School of Nursing, Mishawaka, Indiana.

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May 2018
103 Reads

Perceptions of College Student-Athletes Regarding the Long-Term Effects of Concussions.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2017 Jul/Sep;36(3):210-218

Author Affiliations: 7 Medical, Parkview Regional Medical Center (Ms Fawcett), Fort Wayne; Cardiothoracic Vascular Transplant Unit, Franciscan Alliance (Ms Gibson), Indianapolis; and School of Nursing, Bethel College (Dr Abraham), Mishawaka, Indiana.

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May 2018
39 Reads

Parents’ Perception of the Effects of Childhood Vaccinations

Samuel P. Abraham et al. Ijsrm.Human, 2018; Vol. 9 (1): 211-234

International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

Background and Objectives: Parents‘ perceptions regarding the effects of childhood vaccinations could have a serious implication on the health of their child and the health of the community. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge level of parents and the perception of the effects of vaccinations among parents of small children. Methods: This was a quantitative, cross-sectional study with a descriptive design. A survey was distributed to 120 parents 18 years and older from a community at an early learning center and a college campus in northern Indiana, USA. One parent from each family was asked to participate. The surveys contained eight demographic questions, in addition to 18 survey statements. The Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) guided the study on parental immunization knowledge and decisions. Results: The analysis indicated the participants are likely to vaccinate their children based on the safety of the vaccine, the purpose of the vaccine, education regarding the vaccine, and the factors influencing vaccine administration. Most parents (97.5%) believe that vaccinations are used to prevent future illness. A positive yet unanticipated finding was that the majority of participants did not believe autism was strongly associated with vaccinations. Among the participants, 82% stated it was recommended not to vaccinate a child when they are ill. This was a false statement and showed there needs to be education given to the parent regarding vaccinations. Another finding was that 77% of the participants agreed their decision to vaccinate their children was because of personal history. Conclusion: Vaccination education should be geared towards the gaps in knowledge for participants to understand all aspects of vaccines and how they are related to childhood. Recommendations for practice include the need for increased and more frequent education during parenthood to enhance the rate of vaccinations.

http://www.ijsrm.humanjournals.com

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March 2018
17 Reads

Bridging the Gap With Peer Support: Patricia's Recovery Story.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2018 Mar 8;56(3):7-11. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

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March 2018
17 Reads
0.873 Impact Factor

Factors That Affect Exercise Habits of College Students

Luke Eichorn, Kayla Bruner, Taylor Short & Samuel P. Abraham (2018). Factors That Affect Exercise Habits of College Students. Journal of Education and Development; Vol. 2, No. 1;

Journal of Education and Development

Abstract Various factors affect the exercise habits of college students. Some of these factors include sleep habits, diet, social life, homework, and other extracurricular activities. Although college students are aware of some of these influencing agents, they do not always take the necessary steps to change their habits. Exercise habits that an individual adheres to while in college would often determine their exercise habits for the rest of their lives. The purpose of this study was to determine the various factors that affect the exercise habits of college students. In this research, a convenience sample of 124 college students participated in a cross-sectional survey. The results indicated that the top reasons college students exercised was to remain healthy (M = 3.42, SD = 0.64), to gain the positive feeling that comes from exercise (M = 3.22, SD = 0.74); to join with friends who exercised (M = 2.99, SD = 0.72); and when feeling overweight (M = 2.96, SD = 0.88). Participants gave increased agreement to the item, “Having an increased homework load decreases the time I spend for exercise” (M = 3.10, SD = 0.86). This study may be useful for educators to teach and inform college students on the factors that affect exercise habits. A recommendation is to promote time management skills that are intentional about leaving adequate time for exercise. Teaching students how to balance personal life, school, and work will leave more time for them to exercise, and therefore, increase their health overall. Based on the health belief model, both positive and negative self-perceptions are motivating factors that causes people to take necessary steps to stay healthy. Keywords: exercise and motives, stressors and college students, stress and college students, exercise and college students

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March 2018
24 Reads

College Students’ Perception of the Risk Factors Contributing to Childhood Lead Poisoning

Pulling, A., Sinish, K., Wagner, C., & Abraham, S. P. (2018). College Students’ Perception of the Risk Factors Contributing to Childhood Lead Poisoning. IJSRM International Journal of Science and Research Methodology, 8(4), 143-160.

IJSRM International Journal of Science and Research Methodology

ABSTRACT Background: Lead poisoning can cause harmful nonreversible effects on the body. Lead poisoning is known to cause damage to the nervous system, major organs, and body systems as well as have adverse effects on learning and behavioral development. The purpose of this study was to determine the college students’ perceptions of the risk factors contributing to childhood lead poisoning. Methods: In a quantitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of 97 college students was surveyed. The participants answered five demographic questions and 15 Likert-type statements. Results: Data were analyzed using descriptive statistic techniques, such as frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation. Half of the participants were female. Most of the participants (94%) were 18 to 22 years of age. The participants tended to agree strongly with the item related to lead poisoning having long-term medical effects (M = 3.25, SD = .54) and with buildings built before 1978 containing lead products (M=3.18, SD=0.54). Conclusion: Participants lacked knowledge of the risk factors that could prevent childhood lead poisoning. They were also not well-informed about the resource availability for prevention of childhood lead poisoning.

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February 2018
18 Reads

Skin Cancer Risk-lowering Behaviors and Skincare Habits of Youth Ages 18-25 Years

Elizabeth Rainous1, Eli J. Herrmann2 & Samuel P. Abraham3

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Young adults are known for feeling invincible and thus engaging in risky behaviors. One such risky behavior is not protecting themselves from the sun, which can cause skin cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the skin cancer risk-lowering behaviors and skincare habits among youth ages 18 to 25 years. The findings indicated that a high level of knowledge does not equal regular use of risk-lowering behaviors. This study was quantitative, cross-sectional, and non-experimental. The survey, consisting of 20 Likert-type scale statements, was given in a college consisting of about 2000 students of which 120 college undergraduates participated. Orem’s self-care theory was used as a guide for the study. Participants tended to agree that the use of sunscreen would help protect them from getting skin cancer (M=2.88, SD=0.57), and that sunlight causes skin cancer (M=2.80, SD=0.70). Despite having an adequate level of knowledge on skin cancer risk factors, individuals did not follow through with correct risk-lowering behaviors. For risk-lowering behaviors, more than half of the participants regularly used sunscreen when exposed to the sun (M=2.50, SD=0.90), and most never used tanning beds (M=1.20, SD=0.60).

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February 2018
22 Reads

Families’ Support and Influence on College Students’ Educational Performance

DeFauw, C., Levering, K., Msipa, R. T., & Abraham, S. (2018). Families’ support and influence on college students’ educational performance. Journal of Education and Development, 2(1), 11-19.

Journal of Education and Development

The purpose of this study was to explore families’ support and influence on the educational performance of students on a faith-based campus in northern Indiana, USA. The study answered the following research question: How does families’ support influence college students’ educational performance? This research question was developed after reviewing the literature and coming to the realization that there is little research on families’ influence role in college students’ academic performance. The data was collected through in-depth interviews with 12 students who resided at the college campus. Themes recognized within the study were used to discuss families’ role in students’ academic performance. Considering the families’ role in students’ everyday life and the background support is vital to their educational performance. Themes included: (1) Frequency of contact with family, especially mother; (2) Levels of parental financial involvement; (3) Independence from family; (4) Siblings’ influence on academics; (5) Parents’ spiritual involvement; and (6) Parents’ educational background.

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February 2018
18 Reads

College Students’ Sleep Habits and Their Perceptions Regarding Its Effects on Quality of Life

Herrmann, M. L., Palmer, A. K., Sechrist, M. F., & Abraham, S. (2018). College Students’ Sleep Habits and Their Perceptions Regarding Its Effects on Quality of Life. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(2),

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Objective: Poor sleep in college students can attribute to poor academic performance. Poor sleep is detrimental to health; however, adequate sleep is not often seen as a priority. The objective of the study was to better understand college students’ sleep habits and determine their perceptions regarding the effects of these sleep habits on quality of life. Methodology: A quantitative, cross-sectional approach with a descriptive design was appropriate for this study. Participants were 122 students, in a Christian college with a population of about 2000 in the mid-western region of the United States. The survey instrument was developed with 6 demographic items and 19 statements using a 4-point Likert-type scale. Data collection occurred in the hallway of the library on two days in the spring semester of 2016. Results: Regarding sleep habits, the average college student keeps their sleep and study spaces separate, they wake up at a regular time every day, they do use technology, such as a cell phone, TV/radio, computer, or iPad before going to sleep, and they have a sleep environment that is quiet and calming. A significant finding was that students did not think extracurricular activities (anything outside of class) negatively affected their sleep. Conclusions: A large percentage of students use technology before bed, which places them at a higher risk for negative quality of life. Students admit to experiencing irregularity in their sleep patterns (M=3.59, on a 4-point scale); however, most participants did not agree that caffeine consumption (M=2.15), extracurricular activities (M=2.25), or daytime naps (M=2.16) contributed to sleep problems.

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i2.297

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January 2018
11 Reads

College student’s perception of risk factors related to fast food consumption and their eating habits.

Abraham S, Martinez M, Salas G, et al. College student’s perception of risk factors related to fast food consumption and their eating habits. J Nutr Hum Health. 2018;2(1):18-21

J Nutr Hum Health

The purpose of the current study was to explore college students’ perceptions of the health effects of fast food consumption and their eating habits. The consequences of increased fast food consumption among college students is rising health problems, which include obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. The problem was explored in a quantitative survey using a crosssectional approach with a descriptive design. A sample size of 120 college students among a 2000 student-body population in the Midwestern United States participated in the survey. On a 4-point Likert-type scale of strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (4), the strongest agreement for the perception statement was: “Obesity is linked to increased fast food consumption” (M=3.54; SD=0.57). However, in the habit category, the students claimed, “I go to fast food restaurants more often, in the evenings, when hanging out with friends” (M=3.08; SD=0.73). The students were aware of the risks associated with fast food consumption on health; however, their eating habits did not indicate they practiced what they knew could be harmful to their health, especially when they were socializing with friends. Hopefully, this study will help attract attention to evils of food choices and its effects on health.

http://www.alliedacademies.org/nutrition-human-health/

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January 2018
17 Reads

College students eating habits and knowledge of nutritional requirements.

Abraham S, Noriega Brooke R, Shin JY. College students eating habits and knowledge of nutritional requirements. J Nutr Hum Health. 2018;2(1):13-17

Journal of Nutrition and Human Health

Background: Inadequate nutrition affects students’ health and academic success. Students may have proficient knowledge regarding nutritional requirements; however, the transition to college life gives them more freedom to choose the type and the amount of food they eat. Most college campuses have dining facilities that provide a variety of food options, which can lead to establishing either good or bad eating behaviors. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college students’ eating habits and knowledge of nutritional requirements for health. Method: This was a quantitative, cross-sectional study, with a descriptive design. Results: The students are knowledgeable that consuming fast food, soda, and processed food are unhealthy and they contain additives. They indicated strong agreement to keep themselves hydrated and choosing food because of taste preference. Even though majority admitted eating fresh fruits, a significant number consume processed food such as chips, cookies, and cereal based on convenience. Smartphone resources, vending machine use, and drinking soda were their least frequently used habits. Conclusion: Students have a fair knowledge of nutritional requirements for health; however, food choices they make are not necessarily healthy. Convenience and taste of food were priority.

http://www.alliedacademies.org/nutrition-human-health/

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January 2018
19 Reads

College Students’ Stress Coping Behaviors and Perception of Stress- Effects Holistically

Dexter, L. R., Huff, K., Rudecki, M., & Abraham, S. (2018). College students’ stress coping behaviors and perception of stress-effects holistically. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(2), 1-6. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v3i2

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Objective: The purpose of the current study was to determine college students’ stress coping behaviors and perception of stress-effects holistically (emotionally, mentally, and physically). Participants: The current study was conducted using a convenience sample of 120 students in a Midwestern Christian college with a student population of about 2000. Participants were mostly from the education, nursing, and ministry departments. Method: A quantitative, cross-sectional, with a descriptive survey design was most suitable for this study. Results: Students deal with stressors in positive and negative ways. Positive ways included exercise, depending more on faith, and telling themselves that everything will be “Okay.” Negative ways included eating more, sleeping less, increased use of the Internet and more procrastination. Conclusions: College students are aware of constructive ways to cope with stress; however, these techniques are rarely used. Keywords: stress in college students, spiritual life in college students, mental health, holistic, and stress coping behaviors

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i2.

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January 2018
13 Reads

Building Cultural Competence: The Lived Experience of Semester Study Abroad Students.

Cox L, Crump L, Struwing R, Gillum D, Abraham S, Journal of Christian nursing : a quarterly publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship, 2017, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. E35-E40, 2017

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/28604537

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2017
22 Reads

Self-Evaluation in a Clinical Setting to Develop Nursing Students’ Clinical Judgment

Sobaski, T., & Abraham, S. (2018). Self-evaluation in a clinical setting to develop nursing students’ clinical judgment. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(1), 48-55. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v3i1.241

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Background: The Lasater clinical judgment rubric is based upon Tanner’s clinical judgment model for developing clinical judgment and the incorporation of the Benner Novice to Expert theory. The Lasater clinical judgment rubric has been used in nursing programs at the baccalaureate level and with simulation exercises. Method: In this study, the Lasater clinical judgment rubric was used to compare instructor and associate degree nursing students’ evaluations in an acute care setting during their first nursing care rotation. Data analysis included a split-plot ANOVA with repeat measures. A sample size of 16 students yielded an effect size of .40 with  = .001. Results: There was no significant difference in mean scores between the five administrations of the assessment with different groups. Conclusion: The interactions between the evaluator and the scores over time were consistent between groups. Development of student’s ability to use self-evaluation, introspection, and self-awareness skills are foundational for thinking that is more complex. Keywords: nursing education, clinical judgment, performance based self-evaluation, Lasater clinical judgment rubric

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i1.241

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December 2017
19 Reads

Bridging the Gap With Peer Support: Patricia's Recovery Story.

Authors:

Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/29117423

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December 2017
12 Reads

Health Literacy and Use of Preventative Care of Female Undergraduate Nursing vs. Non-Nursing Students

Eden, K., Mann, M., Miller, G., & Abraham, S. (2018). Health Literacy and Use of Preventive Care of Female Undergraduate Nursing vs. Non-Nursing Students. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 3(1), 22-33. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v3i1.230

International Journal of Studies in Nursing;

Abstract Background: Health literacy and use of preventative care are important aspects of health care. Health literacy, or the ability to understand basic medical knowledge, affects a person’s understanding and use of preventative health care. Aim: This study was designed to investigate the perception of health literacy and use of preventative care resources by female undergraduate college students. Method: This is a quantitative, non-experimental descriptive research study with a cross-sectional design. A 30-item demographic yes or no and a Likert-type scale was used to survey 62 female college students living in a dormitory. The goal was to discover if additional education is needed to obtain optimal utilization of health care resources for this population. Result: Surveying the undergraduate nursing and non-nursing students helped raise awareness of health literacy of the female students. Conclusion: Understanding the use of preventative care resources by this population may influence the way nursing interventions are formulated.

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v3i1.230

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November 2017
21 Reads

Nursing Students’ Perception of Childhood Lead Poisoning Risk Factors

Morrison, Ressler, Sheets, & Abraham (2017). Nursing Students’ Perception of Childhood Lead Poisoning Risk Factors. International Journal of Studies in Nursing; Vol. 2, No. 2.

https://doi.org/10.20849/ijsn.v2i2

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November 2017
12 Reads

Building Cultural Competence: The Lived Experience of Semester Study Abroad Students.

J Christ Nurs 2017 Jul/Sep;34(3):E35-E40

Lauren Cox, BSN, RN, works as a nurse at Elkhart General Hospital, Elkhart, Indiana. Lauren Crump, BSN, RN, works as a nurse at Elkhart General Hospital, Elkhart, Indiana. Renee Struwing, BSN, RN, works as a nurse at Advocate Healthcare Hospital, Libertyville, Illinois. Deborah Gillum, PhD, RN, is the Dean of Nursing at Bethel College School of Nursing, Mishawaka, Indiana. Sam Abraham, DHA, RN, is an assistant professor of nursing at Bethel College, Mishawaka, Indiana.

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October 2017
67 Reads

College Students’ Knowledge of Risk Factors Related to Cardiovascular Disease

Andrew, Hiles-Gaddy, MacRitchie, & Abraham (2017). College students’ knowledge of risk factors related to cardiovascular disease. International Journal of Studies in Nursing, 2(2). 1-10. doi:10.20849/ijsn.v2i2.

International Journal of Studies in Nursing

Abstract Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a prevalent health issue, accounting for a large proportion of deaths worldwide. Despite the high prevalence of this potentially detrimental condition, many college students are not fully aware of its contributing risk factors. The purpose of the current study was to determine college students’ knowledge of risk factors related to CVD. Methods: This was a quantitative, cross-sectional study with a descriptive design. A survey with 5 demographic questions and 20 Likert-type statements was administered to 118 students in a Midwestern college in the United States. Results: The majority of the students displayed knowledge of risk factors such as smoking tobacco, inactive lifestyle, hypertension, low intake of fruits and vegetables, elevated cholesterol levels, high dietary sodium and obesity. However, a knowledge deficit existed regarding gender and ethnicity, which are non-modifiable risk factors, albeit important considerations. Conclusions: Although students appeared knowledgeable about areas such as cholesterol in cardiovascular health, further education could be beneficial to improve this knowledge base. Keywords: risk factors, cardiovascular disease, modifiable risk factors, non-modifiable risk factors, dietary risk factors, and heart disease

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October 2017
21 Reads

A Qualitative Study of Health Care Experiences Among International Students.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2017 Jan/Mar;36(1):78-86

Author Affiliations: Midwifery Clinic, Africa (Ms Anderson); Nursing Department (Ms Kitsos) and Critical Care (Ms Miller), Elkhart General Hospital; and Bethel College School of Nursing, Mishawaka (Dr Abraham), Indiana.

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July 2017
26 Reads

A Qualitative Study of the Change-of-Shift Report at the Patients' Bedside.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2016 Oct/Dec;35(4):294-304

Author Affiliations: Goshen Hospital, Goshen (Mr Grimshaw); Critical Care (ICU), VA Northern Indiana Health Care System, Pierceton (Mr Hatch); Critical Care Unit, Kosciusko Community Hospital, Warsaw (Ms Willard); and Bethel College School of Nursing, Mishawaka (Dr Abraham), Indiana.

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June 2017
27 Reads

Oral Health Behaviors and Perceptions Among College Students.

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2016 Oct/Dec;35(4):350-360

Author Affiliations: St. Francis Hospital, Tulsa, Oklahoma (Ms Crabtree); Medical Cardiology, St. Mary's Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (Ms Kirk); Oncology Care Services, Elkhart General Hospital, Elkhart (Mrs Moore); and Bethel College School of Nursing (Dr Abraham), Mishawaka, Indiana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HCM.0000000000000124DOI Listing
June 2017
19 Reads

Patient Falls in the Acute Care Hospital Setting as Perceived by the Frontline Staff

Shumba C, Abraham S (2017) Patient Falls in the Acute Care Hospital Setting as Perceived by the Frontline Staff. Prensa Med Argent 103:3. doi: 10.4172/lpma.1000251

LaPrensa Medica Argentina

Abstract Patient falls and related injuries are traumatic life experiences, for patients, family members, and institutions that provide health care. Falls in acute care hospitals are a significant nursing clinical problem with legal implications and regulatory consequences. The purpose of this study was to identify perceptions of frontline staff regarding the factors associated with patient falls in acute care hospital settings. A survey of 20 items, using a Likert-type scale consisting of intrinsic and extrinsic factor statements, and 1 openended question were used in this study. The results were found using descriptive statistics. The top 4 intrinsic factors contributing to falls as agreed by the participants in order of mean were confusion, unsteady gait, history of falls, and taking multiple medications. The top 3 extrinsic contributing fall risk factors were identified as lack of supervision, lack of teamwork, and inadequate staff education. In conclusion, the safety of patients who are confused, have unsteady gait, have fallen before, or on multiple medications need to be supervised using a team approach, with staff who are trained in caring for fall risk patients. Maslow and Orlando’s theories were used to guide the study.

https://www.scitechnol.com/peer-review/patient-falls-in-the-acute-care-hospital-setting-as-perceived-by-the-frontline-staff-dBSx.php?article_id=6303

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June 2017
20 Reads

Managing Patient Falls in Psychiatric Inpatient Units: Part 2.

Authors:
Sam Abraham

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2016 Apr-Jun;35(2):121-33

Author Affiliations: Bethel College, Mishawaka, Indiana.

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June 2017
15 Reads

Managing Patient Falls in Psychiatric Inpatient Units: Part 1.

Authors:
Sam Abraham

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2016 Jan/Mar;35(1):21-27

Author Affiliation: Bethel College, Mishawaka, Indiana.

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June 2017
50 Reads

Looking for a Psychiatric Fall Risk Assessment Tool

Abraham S (2016) Looking for a Psychiatric Fall Risk Assessment Tool. Ann Psychiatry Ment Health 4(2): 1061.

Annals of Psychiatry and Mental Health

http://www.jscimedcentral.com/Psychiatry/psychiatry-4-1061.pdf

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2016
22 Reads

Increasing Registered Nurse Retention Using Mentors in Critical Care Services.

Schroyer CC, Zellers R, Abraham S, The health care manager, 2016, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 251-265, 2016

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/27455367

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2016
37 Reads

Factors Contributing to Psychiatric Patient Falls

Abraham S (2016) Factors Contributing to Psychiatric Patient Falls. J Community Med Health 6: 410. doi:10.4172/2161-0711.1000410

Journal of Community Medicine & Health Education

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2016
20 Reads

Antidepressant Drugs to Electroconvulsive Therapy: Kristina's Story.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv 2016 Aug;54(8):43-7

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August 2016
31 Reads
0.873 Impact Factor

Fall prevention conceptual framework.

Authors:
Sam Abraham

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2011 Apr-Jun;30(2):179-84

Department of Nursing, Lake Michigan College, Benton Harbor, USA.

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September 2011
477 Reads

Acquisition and allocation of human, financial, and physical resources in the health care system.

Authors:
Sam Abraham

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2011 Jan-Mar;30(1):38-44

Department of Nursing, Lake Michigan College, Benton Harbor, Michigan, USA.

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May 2011
16 Reads

Technological trends in health care: electronic health record.

Authors:
Sam Abraham

Health Care Manag (Frederick) 2010 Oct-Dec;29(4):318-23

Department of Nursing, Lake Michigan College, Benton Harbor, Michigan, USA.

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March 2011
72 Reads

Top co-authors

Melissa Willard
Melissa Willard

Michigan State University

1
Daniel Hatch
Daniel Hatch

Utah State University

1
John Grimshaw
John Grimshaw

Biochemisches Institut der Universität Zürich

1
Andrea Miller
Andrea Miller

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

1
Rebecca Crabtree
Rebecca Crabtree

Author Affiliations: St. Francis Hospital

1
Coreena C Schroyer
Coreena C Schroyer

Author Affiliations: Elkhart General Hospital

1