Publications by authors named "Salvatore Corallino"

11 Publications

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The RESOLUTE consortium: unlocking SLC transporters for drug discovery.

Authors:
Giulio Superti-Furga Daniel Lackner Tabea Wiedmer Alvaro Ingles-Prieto Barbara Barbosa Enrico Girardi Ulrich Goldmann Bettina Gürtl Kristaps Klavins Christoph Klimek Sabrina Lindinger Eva Liñeiro-Retes André C Müller Svenja Onstein Gregor Redinger Daniela Reil Vitaly Sedlyarov Gernot Wolf Matthew Crawford Robert Everley David Hepworth Shenping Liu Stephen Noell Mary Piotrowski Robert Stanton Hui Zhang Salvatore Corallino Andrea Faedo Maria Insidioso Giovanna Maresca Loredana Redaelli Francesca Sassone Lia Scarabottolo Michela Stucchi Paola Tarroni Sara Tremolada Helena Batoulis Andreas Becker Eckhard Bender Yung-Ning Chang Alexander Ehrmann Anke Müller-Fahrnow Vera Pütter Diana Zindel Bradford Hamilton Martin Lenter Diana Santacruz Coralie Viollet Charles Whitehurst Kai Johnsson Philipp Leippe Birgit Baumgarten Lena Chang Yvonne Ibig Martin Pfeifer Jürgen Reinhardt Julian Schönbett Paul Selzer Klaus Seuwen Charles Bettembourg Bruno Biton Jörg Czech Hélène de Foucauld Michel Didier Thomas Licher Vincent Mikol Antje Pommereau Frédéric Puech Veeranagouda Yaligara Aled Edwards Brandon J Bongers Laura H Heitman Ad P IJzerman Huub J Sijben Gerard J P van Westen Justine Grixti Douglas B Kell Farah Mughal Neil Swainston Marina Wright-Muelas Tina Bohstedt Nicola Burgess-Brown Liz Carpenter Katharina Dürr Jesper Hansen Andreea Scacioc Giulia Banci Claire Colas Daniela Digles Gerhard Ecker Barbara Füzi Viktoria Gamsjäger Melanie Grandits Riccardo Martini Florentina Troger Patrick Altermatt Cédric Doucerain Franz Dürrenberger Vania Manolova Anna-Lena Steck Hanna Sundström Maria Wilhelm Claire M Steppan

Nat Rev Drug Discov 2020 07;19(7):429-430

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/d41573-020-00056-6DOI Listing
July 2020

Unjamming overcomes kinetic and proliferation arrest in terminally differentiated cells and promotes collective motility of carcinoma.

Nat Mater 2019 11 22;18(11):1252-1263. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

IFOM, the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Milan, Italy.

During wound repair, branching morphogenesis and carcinoma dissemination, cellular rearrangements are fostered by a solid-to-liquid transition, known as unjamming. The biomolecular machinery behind unjamming and its pathophysiological relevance remain, however, unclear. Here, we study unjamming in a variety of normal and tumorigenic epithelial two-dimensional (2D) and 3D collectives. Biologically, the increased level of the small GTPase RAB5A sparks unjamming by promoting non-clathrin-dependent internalization of epidermal growth factor receptor that leads to hyperactivation of the kinase ERK1/2 and phosphorylation of the actin nucleator WAVE2. This cascade triggers collective motility effects with striking biophysical consequences. Specifically, unjamming in tumour spheroids is accompanied by persistent and coordinated rotations that progressively remodel the extracellular matrix, while simultaneously fluidizing cells at the periphery. This concurrent action results in collective invasion, supporting the concept that the endo-ERK1/2 pathway is a physicochemical switch to initiate collective invasion and dissemination of otherwise jammed carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41563-019-0425-1DOI Listing
November 2019

Author Correction: A RAB35-p85/PI3K axis controls oscillatory apical protrusions required for efficient chemotactic migration.

Nat Commun 2018 05 22;9(1):2085. Epub 2018 May 22.

IFOM, the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Via Adamello 16, 20139, Milan, Italy.

The originally published version of this Article contained an error in the name of the author Salvatore Corallino, which was incorrectly given as Corallino Salvatore. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-04515-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5964222PMC
May 2018

A RAB35-p85/PI3K axis controls oscillatory apical protrusions required for efficient chemotactic migration.

Nat Commun 2018 04 16;9(1):1475. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

IFOM, the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Via Adamello 16, 20139, Milan, Italy.

How cells move chemotactically remains a major unmet challenge in cell biology. Emerging evidence indicates that for interpreting noisy, shallow gradients of soluble cues a system must behave as an excitable process. Here, through an RNAi-based, high-content screening approach, we identify RAB35 as necessary for the formation of growth factors (GFs)-induced waves of circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs), apically restricted actin-rich migratory protrusions. RAB35 is sufficient to induce recurrent and polarized CDRs that travel as propagating waves, thus behaving as an excitable system that can be biased to control cell steering. Consistently, RAB35 is essential for promoting directed chemotactic migration and chemoinvasion of various cells in response to gradients of motogenic GFs. Molecularly, RAB35 does so by directly regulating the activity of p85/PI3K polarity axis. We propose that RAB35 is a molecular determinant for the control of an excitable, oscillatory system that acts as a steering wheel for GF-mediated chemotaxis and chemoinvasion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-03571-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5902610PMC
April 2018

Endocytic reawakening of motility in jammed epithelia.

Nat Mater 2017 05 30;16(5):587-596. Epub 2017 Jan 30.

IFOM-FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Via Adamello, 16 20139, Milan, Italy.

Dynamics of epithelial monolayers has recently been interpreted in terms of a jamming or rigidity transition. How cells control such phase transitions is, however, unknown. Here we show that RAB5A, a key endocytic protein, is sufficient to induce large-scale, coordinated motility over tens of cells, and ballistic motion in otherwise kinetically arrested monolayers. This is linked to increased traction forces and to the extension of cell protrusions, which align with local velocity. Molecularly, impairing endocytosis, macropinocytosis or increasing fluid efflux abrogates RAB5A-induced collective motility. A simple model based on mechanical junctional tension and an active cell reorientation mechanism for the velocity of self-propelled cells identifies regimes of monolayer dynamics that explain endocytic reawakening of locomotion in terms of a combination of large-scale directed migration and local unjamming. These changes in multicellular dynamics enable collectives to migrate under physical constraints and may be exploited by tumours for interstitial dissemination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmat4848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5407454PMC
May 2017

Alterations in the phosphoproteomic profile of cells expressing a non-functional form of the SHP2 phosphatase.

N Biotechnol 2016 Sep 24;33(5 Pt A):524-36. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della ricerca scientifica, 00133 Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

The phosphatase SHP-2 plays an essential role in growth factor signaling and mutations in its locus is the cause of congenital and acquired pathologies. Mutations of SHP-2 are known to affect the activation of the RAS pathway. Gain-of-function mutations cause the Noonan syndrome, the most common non-chromosomal congenital disorder. In order to obtain a holistic picture of the intricate regulatory mechanisms underlying SHP-2 physiology and pathology, we set out to characterize perturbations of the cell phosphorylation profile caused by an altered localization of SHP-2. To describe the proteins whose activity may be directly or indirectly modulated by SHP-2 activity, we identified tyrosine peptides that are differentially phosphorylated in wild type SHP-2 cells and isogenic cells expressing a non-functional SHP-2 variant that cannot dephosphorylate the physiological substrates due to a defect in cellular localization upon growth factor stimulation. By an iTRAQ based strategy coupled to mass spectrometry, we have identified 63 phosphorylated tyrosine residues in 53 different proteins whose phosphorylation is affected by SHP-2 activity. Some of these confirm already established regulatory mechanisms while many others suggest new possible signaling routes that may contribute to the modulation of the ERK and p38 pathways by SHP-2. Interestingly many new proteins that we found to be regulated by SHP-2 activity are implicated in the formation and regulation of focal adhesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbt.2015.08.002DOI Listing
September 2016

Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Plasticity Harnesses Endocytic Circuitries.

Front Oncol 2015 26;5:45. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare (IFOM) , Milan , Italy ; Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano , Milan , Italy.

The ability of cells to alter their phenotypic and morphological characteristics, known as cellular plasticity, is critical in normal embryonic development and adult tissue repair and contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases, such as organ fibrosis and cancer. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a type of cellular plasticity. This transition involves genetic and epigenetic changes as well as alterations in protein expression and post-translational modifications. These changes result in reduced cell-cell adhesion, enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered organization of the cytoskeleton and of cell polarity. Among these modifications, loss of cell polarity represents the nearly invariable, distinguishing feature of EMT that frequently precedes the other traits or might even occur in their absence. EMT transforms cell morphology and physiology, and hence cell identity, from one typical of cells that form a tight barrier, like epithelial and endothelial cells, to one characterized by a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype. Time-resolved proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of cells undergoing EMT recently identified thousands of changes in proteins involved in many cellular processes, including cell proliferation and motility, DNA repair, and - unexpectedly - membrane trafficking (1). These results have highlighted a picture of great complexity. First, the EMT transition is not an all-or-none response but rather a gradual process that develops over time. Second, EMT events are highly dynamic and frequently reversible, involving both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. The net results is that EMT generates populations of mixed cells, with partial or full phenotypes, possibly accounting (at least in part) for the physiological as well as pathological cellular heterogeneity of some tissues. Endocytic circuitries have emerged as complex connectivity infrastructures for numerous cellular networks required for the execution of different biological processes, with a primary role in the control of polarized functions. Thus, they may be relevant for controlling EMT or certain aspects of it. Here, by discussing a few paradigmatic cases, we will outline how endocytosis may be harnessed by the EMT process to promote dynamic changes in cellular identity, and to increase cellular flexibility and adaptation to micro-environmental cues, ultimately impacting on physiological and pathological processes, first and foremost cancer progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2015.00045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4341543PMC
March 2015

Reactive oxygen species and epidermal growth factor are antagonistic cues controlling SHP-2 dimerization.

Mol Cell Biol 2012 May 12;32(10):1998-2009. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase plays key regulatory roles in the modulation of the cell response to growth factors and cytokines. Over the past decade, the integration of genetic, biochemical, and structural data has helped in interpreting the pathological consequences of altered SHP-2 function. Using complementary approaches, we provide evidence here that endogenous SHP-2 can dimerize through the formation of disulfide bonds that may also involve the catalytic cysteine. We show that the fraction of dimeric SHP-2 is modulated by growth factor stimulation and by the cell redox state. Comparison of the phosphatase activities of the monomeric self-inhibited and dimeric forms indicated that the latter is 3-fold less active, thus pointing to the dimerization process as an additional mechanism for controlling SHP-2 activity. Remarkably, dimers formed by different SHP-2 mutants displaying diverse biochemical properties were found to respond differently to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Although this differential behavior cannot be rationalized mechanistically yet, these findings suggest a possible regulatory role of dimerization in SHP-2 function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.06674-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3347403PMC
May 2012

The 4G10, pY20 and p-TYR-100 antibody specificity: profiling by peptide microarrays.

N Biotechnol 2012 Jun 13;29(5):571-7. Epub 2011 Dec 13.

Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della ricerca scientifica, 00133 Rome, Italy.

The reversible phosphorylation of tyrosine residues is one of the most frequent post-translational modifications regulating enzymatic activities and protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic cells. Cells responding to internal or external regulatory inputs modify their phosphorylation status and diseased cells can often be diagnosed by observing alterations in their qualitative or quantitative phosphorylation profile. As a consequence the ability to describe the phosphorylation profile of a cell is central to many approaches aiming at the characterisation of signalling pathways. Anti-phosphotyrosine (pY) antibodies are widely used as experimental tools to monitor the phosphorylation status of a cell. By using peptide microarray technology we have characterised the substrate specificity of three widely used pY antibodies. We report that they are more sensitive to sequence context than is generally assumed and that their sequence preferences differ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbt.2011.12.001DOI Listing
June 2012

Identification of new substrates of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B by Bayesian integration of proteome evidence.

J Biol Chem 2011 Feb 1;286(6):4173-85. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00144 Rome, Italy.

There is growing evidence that tyrosine phosphatases display an intrinsic enzymatic preference for the sequence context flanking the target phosphotyrosines. On the other hand, substrate selection in vivo is decisively guided by the enzyme-substrate connectivity in the protein interaction network. We describe here a system wide strategy to infer physiological substrates of protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we integrate, by a Bayesian model, proteome wide evidence about in vitro substrate preference, as determined by a novel high-density peptide chip technology, and "closeness" in the protein interaction network. This allows to rank candidate substrates of the human PTP1B phosphatase. Ultimately a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches were used to verify the prediction that the tyrosine phosphorylation levels of five high-ranking substrates, PLC-γ1, Gab1, SHP2, EGFR, and SHP1, are indeed specifically modulated by PTP1B. In addition, we demonstrate that the PTP1B-mediated dephosphorylation of Gab1 negatively affects its EGF-induced association with the phosphatase SHP2. The dissociation of this signaling complex is accompanied by a decrease of ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.157420DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039405PMC
February 2011

The central proline rich region of POB1/REPS2 plays a regulatory role in epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis by binding to 14-3-3 and SH3 domain-containing proteins.

BMC Biochem 2008 Jul 22;9:21. Epub 2008 Jul 22.

Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome, Italy.

Background: The human POB1/REPS2 (Partner of RalBP1) protein is highly conserved in mammals where it has been suggested to function as a molecular scaffold recruiting proteins involved in vesicular traffic and linking them to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery. More recently POB1/REPS2 was found highly expressed in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell lines, while one of its isoforms (isoform 2) is down regulated during prostate cancer progression.

Results: In this report we characterize the central proline rich domain of POB1/REPS2 and we describe for the first time its functional role in receptor endocytosis. We show that the ectopic expression of this domain has a dominant negative effect on the endocytosis of activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) while leaving transferrin receptor endocytosis unaffected. By a combination of different approaches (phage display, bioinformatics predictions, peptide arrays, mutagenic analysis, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation), we have identified two closely spaced binding motifs for 14-3-3 and for the SH3 of the proteins Amphiphysin II and Grb2. Differently from wild type, proline rich domains that are altered in these motifs do not inhibit EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that these binding motifs play a functional role in this process.

Conclusion: Our findings are relevant to the characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the involvement of POB1/REPS2, SH3 and 14-3-3 proteins in receptor endocytosis, suggesting that 14-3-3 could work by bridging the EGF receptor and the scaffold protein POB1/REPS2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2091-9-21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2494995PMC
July 2008