Publications by authors named "Salvatore Coppola"

9 Publications

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[Primary hyperoxaluria: case report and therapeutic perspectives].

G Ital Nefrol 2020 Feb 12;37(1). Epub 2020 Feb 12.

UOSD Nefrologia e dialisi, P.O. Piedimonte Matese, Azienda Sanitaria Locale Caserta.

Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) is a rare genetic disorder with autosomal recessive transmission, characterized by high endogenous production and markedly excessive urinary excretion of oxalate (Ox). It causes the accumulation of calcium oxide crystals in organs and tissues including bones, heart, arteries, skin and kidneys, where it may cause oxalo-calcic nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and chronic renal failure. Some forms are secondary to enteric diseases, drugs or dietetic substances, while three primitive forms, caused by various enzymatic defects, are currently known: PH1, PH2 and PH3. An early diagnosis, with the aid of biochemical and genetic investigations, helps prevent complications and establish a therapeutic strategy that often includes liver and liver-kidney transplantation, improving the prognosis of these patients. In this work we describe the clinical case of a patient with PH1 undergoing extracorporeal hemodialysis treatment and we report the latest research results that could change the life of patients with PH.
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February 2020

[The unusual couple: a clinical case of coexistence between aHUS and Fabry's disease].

G Ital Nefrol 2019 Feb;36(1)

Professore Ordinario di Nefrologia, Università degli Studi della Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli.

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, potentially lethal (1-4) systemic disorder, capable of affecting both adults and children, causing thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) (5) that leads to the formation of thrombus within small blood vessels with multiple organ failure. The pathogenesis of the aHUS is part of a sort of chronic and uncontrolled activation of the complement system by genetic mutation of some proteins usually responsible for its self-regulation (6,7). Today, the rapid diagnosis of the disease and the timely start of treatment with eculizumab, improve outcomes of renal failure, stroke and heart attack (8-10). Fabry disease is a rare tesaurismosis, X linked, due to the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (11-13), necessary for the physiological catabolism of glycosphingolipids. Multisystem clinical manifestations lead to a serious degenerative pathology. The diagnostic suspicion based on anamnesis and careful research of the symptoms and then confirmed by the enzymatic dosage of alpha galactosidase or by molecular analysis, allows the early treatment of the patient with enzyme replacement therapy, guaranteeing the resolution and/or slowing down the evolution of the disease, especially in the brain, heart and kidneys. In this report, we describe the clinical case of a patient who is a carrier of both rare diseases.
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February 2019

Therapy of hyperhomocysteinemia in hemodialysis patients: effects of folates and N-acetylcysteine.

J Ren Nutr 2012 Sep 9;22(5):507-514.e1. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

First Division of Nephrology, Department of Cardio-thoracic and Respiratory Sciences, Second University of Medicine, Naples, Italy.

Objective: Uremia represents a state where hyperhomocysteinemia is resistant to folate therapy, thus undermining intervention trials' efficacy. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, in addition to folates (5-methyltetrahydrofolate, MTHF), was tested in a population of hemodialysis patients.

Design: The study is an open, parallel, intervention study.

Setting: Ambulatory chronic hemodialysis patients.

Subjects: Clinically stable chronic hemodialysis patients, on hemodialysis since more than 3 months, undergoing a folate washout. Control group on standard therapy (n = 50).

Intervention: One group was treated with intravenous MTHF (MTHF group, n = 48). A second group was represented by patients treated with MTHF, and, during the course of 10 hemodialysis sessions, NAC was administered intravenous (MTHF + NAC group, n = 47).

Main Outcome Measure: Plasma homocysteine measured before and after dialysis at the first and the last treatment.

Results: At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in predialysis plasma homocysteine levels in the MTHF group and MTHF + NAC group, compared with the control group, but no significant difference between the MTHF group and MTHF + NAC group. A significant decrease in postdialysis plasma homocysteine levels in MTHF + NAC group (10.27 ± 0.94 μmol/L, 95% confidence interval: 8.37-12.17) compared with the MTHF group (16.23 ± 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 14.55-17.90) was present. In the MTHF + NAC group, 64% of patients reached a postdialysis homocysteine level <12 μmol/L, compared with 19% in the MTHF group and 16% in the control group.

Conclusions: NAC therapy induces a significant additional decrease in homocysteine removal during dialysis. The advantage is limited to the time of administration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2011.10.007DOI Listing
September 2012

Diversity of Staphylococcus species strains based on partial kat (catalase) gene sequences and design of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay for identification and differentiation of coagulase-positive species (S. aureus, S. delphini, S. hyicus, S. intermedius, S. pseudintermedius, and S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans).

J Clin Microbiol 2010 Jan 4;48(1):192-201. Epub 2009 Nov 4.

Department of Food Science, School of Agriculture, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Italy.

A set of degenerate PCR primers was designed and used to amplify and sequence about 75% of the catalase (kat) gene from each of 49 staphylococcal strains. In some strains of Staphylococcus xylosus, S. saprophyticus, and S. equorum, two catalase genes, katA and katB, were found. A phylogenetic tree was generated and showed diversities among 66 partial (about 900-bp) staphylococcal kat nucleotide sequences (including 17 sequences found in GenBank) representing 26 different species. The topology of this tree showed a distribution of staphylococcal species similar, but not identical, to those reported previously based on 16S rRNA, hsp60, sodA, rpoB, tuf, and gap genes. The kat gene sequences were less conserved than those of 16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, and tuf genes and slightly more conserved than those of the gap gene. Therefore, kat gene sequence analysis may provide an additional marker for inferring phylogenetic relationships of staphylococci. Moreover, the discrete nucleotide polymorphism revealed in this gene could be exploited for rapid, low-cost identification of staphylococcal species through PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. In this study, a PCR-RFLP assay performed by using only the TaqI restriction enzyme was successfully developed for rapid unequivocal identification/differentiation, at species and subspecies levels, of coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). The assay was validated by testing the DNA from 100 staphylococcal strains, including reference and wild CPS strains isolated from different environments. This reliable, rapid, and low-cost approach (requiring about 6 h from DNA isolation to the achievement of results and <5 Euros for each strain tested) allowed unambiguous identification of all the strains assayed, including the newly described S. delphini and S. pseudintermedius CPS species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00542-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2812296PMC
January 2010

Microbial diversity in natural whey cultures used for the production of Caciocavallo Silano PDO cheese.

Int J Food Microbiol 2008 May 27;124(2):164-70. Epub 2008 Mar 27.

School of Biotechnological Sciences, Department of Food Science, University of Naples Federico II, via Università 100, Portici, Italy.

The microbial diversity of sixty-three Natural Whey Cultures (NWCs) for the manufacture of Caciocavallo Silano cheese PDO was studied. The NWCs were collected from different dairies covering the whole territory of PDO production including five different regions of southern Italy. The microbial species diversity was determined by direct DNA extraction from NWCs and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification of variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). DGGE and DHPLC fingerprinting yielded the same results in terms of number of bands/peaks and specific migration/retention time of the amplicons. The DHPLC technique was used in this study for the first time to assess a food-related mixed microbial community by a culture-independent approach and proved to be at least as effective as DGGE in profiling species diversity in NWCs. Cluster analysis of DGGE and DHPLC data revealed that the species-related groups of similarity were not dependent on the geographical origin of the NWCs. The presence of three groups of 10-14 NWCs at 100% of species similarity indicated that some species associations are very commonly occurring in the NWCs for Caciocavallo Silano cheese PDO. A RAPD-PCR analysis of the NWCs was also performed for the members of the above groups and it showed that, though characterized by the same species diversity, most of the identical NWCs included different biotypes. The sequences of DGGE bands and DHPLC peaks revealed the occurrence of mainly thermophilic lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus delbrueckii, L. helveticus and Streptococcus thermophilus even though the mesophilic Lactococcus lactis also occurred in some NWCs. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that the microbial diversity of NWCs used for the Caciocavallo Silano PDO cheese is not high, it is not dependent on the geographical origin and the same microbial species occur within the territory examined. The microbiota of fermented PDO products and its possible link with territory should be studied case by case in order to have useful evidences for the assessment of product quality and authenticity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.03.007DOI Listing
May 2008

Yeast dynamics during spontaneous wine fermentation of the Catalanesca grape.

Int J Food Microbiol 2007 Jun 25;117(2):201-10. Epub 2007 Apr 25.

Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Sezione di Microbiologia Agraria, Alimentare e Ambientale e di Igiene, Stazione di Microbiologia Industriale, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Italy.

Although the use of starter cultures in winemaking has improved the reproducibility and predictability of wine quality, the main drawback to this practice is the lack of the typical traits of wines produced by spontaneous fermentation. In this study, we identified for the first time the yeast population occurring during spontaneous fermentation of the Catalanesca white grape, a variety from Campania (Italy). Yeasts were identified using molecular tools: PCR-DGGE and partial sequence analysis of the 26S rRNA gene from isolates. Eighteen different species belonging to 11 different genera were identified. Hanseniaspora spp., Issatchenkia spp. and Candida spp. were the dominant yeasts during the early stages of fermentation, while the middle and end phases were dominated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four species of Issatchenkia spp., rarely isolated from wine fermentation, were found in this study accounting for the 33.5% of the total isolates. The RAPD-PCR screening of the isolates followed by partial rRNA gene sequencing proved to be a very effective approach to first differentiate the isolates and then identify yeast species involved in a wine making procedure. The results show very high yeast diversity in this natural wine fermentation and also highlight the possibility of considering interesting autochthonous strains for starter selection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2007.04.007DOI Listing
June 2007

Evaluation of microbial diversity during the manufacture of Fior di Latte di Agerola, a traditional raw milk pasta-filata cheese of the Naples area.

J Dairy Res 2006 Aug 29;73(3):264-72. Epub 2006 Mar 29.

Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, 80055 Portici, Italy.

Microbial diversity of the raw milk for the production of Fior di Latte di Agerola and its changes during cheesemaking were studied. Viable counts showed that at the end of curd ripening, loads of lactic acid bacteria, both mesophilic and thermophilic rods and cocci, higher than those commonly evidenced in similar cheeses produced by using natural or commercial starters, were detected. Identification of 272 isolates, supported by molecular diagnostic aids, evidenced representative cultures of a high number of bacterial taxa of interest as participating in the process, although most of the isolates belonged to Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus helveticus species. RAPD-PCR and REA-PFGE biotyping were performed for the isolates of the above species and it was shown that most of the strains isolated from the raw milk occurred during the whole cheesemaking process, and an active role of these strains in the fermentation was supposed. The results offer further proof of the importance of the raw milk as source of technologically interesting strains of lactic acid bacteria capable of driving the fermentation of traditional cheeses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022029906001804DOI Listing
August 2006

Sequence heterogeneity in the lacSZ operon of Streptococcus thermophilus and its use in PCR systems for strain differentiation.

Res Microbiol 2005 Mar 26;156(2):161-72. Epub 2004 Nov 26.

Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Sezione di Microbiologia Agraria, Alimentare e Ambientale e di Igiene, Stazione di Microbiologia Industriale, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici, Italy.

Sequences of the lacSZ operon of 29 Streptococcus thermophilus strains from different dairy products were determined. Differences in sequence among the strains were detected within LacS more often than in the LacZ gene. The sequences were aligned and compared and it was possible to gather the strains into three groups of similarity on the basis of the LacS gene sequence. The dairy environment of origin did not seem to be related to the lacSZ operon sequence and thus to the similarity shown. Nucleotide variability was investigated and a total of 139 nucleotide changes were found in the LacS gene while 40 nucleotide changes were found in the sequences of the LacZ gene. Moreover, the influence of the nucleotide changes on the amino acid sequence of the LacS transporter and of the beta-galactosidase enzyme were discussed. Sequence variability within the region upstream from the LacS gene was used to develop group-specific PCR systems capable of distinguishing S. thermophilus at the strain level. A strain-specific primer set was designed allowing the specific detection of 11 out of 29 strains of S. thermophilus. Moreover, LacS-PCR-SSCP analysis of the 29 strains provided 2 different profiles, whereas 4 strain-specific profiles were detected by LacS-PCR-DGGE, indicating the potential to use these techniques for profiling and monitoring population of strains of S. thermophilus in food products. The results are discussed with reference to the potential of these PCR methods for ascertaining strain dominance and starter fitness in dairy processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resmic.2004.09.005DOI Listing
March 2005

Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Oenococcus oeni strains isolated from Italian wines.

Int J Food Microbiol 2003 May;83(1):1-14

Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Agrarie, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Piazzale delle Cascine 27, I 50144 Florence, Italy.

A phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 84 Oenococcus oeni isolates from Italian wines of different oenological areas was carried out. Numerical analysis of fatty acid profiles grouped the isolates into two clusters at low level of similarity (63%), the minor cluster containing seven isolates besides the type and the reference strains. Forthy-eight O. oeni isolates, representative of the two clusters, showed no differences in their metabolic properties (heterolactic fermentation pattern, citrate degradation capability and formation of some secondary metabolites). Moreover, the analysis of species-specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region polymorphism as well as the sequence-specific separation of V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis demonstrated a substantial homogeneity among the isolates. On the basis of ApaI Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) restriction patterns, the 84 isolates were grouped into five different clusters at 70% similarity, but no correlation with the phenotypic groups could be demonstrated. However, by combining phenotypic and genotypic data, the 84 O. oeni isolates grouped into eight phenotypic-genotypic combined profiles and a relationship between the origin of the isolates and their combined profile became evident, so that a sort of strain specificity can be envisaged for each wine-producing area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0168-1605(02)00323-9DOI Listing
May 2003