Publications by authors named "Salvador Lladó"

11 Publications

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GlobalFungi, a global database of fungal occurrences from high-throughput-sequencing metabarcoding studies.

Sci Data 2020 07 13;7(1):228. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi are key players in vital ecosystem services, spanning carbon cycling, decomposition, symbiotic associations with cultivated and wild plants and pathogenicity. The high importance of fungi in ecosystem processes contrasts with the incompleteness of our understanding of the patterns of fungal biogeography and the environmental factors that drive those patterns. To reduce this gap of knowledge, we collected and validated data published on the composition of soil fungal communities in terrestrial environments including soil and plant-associated habitats and made them publicly accessible through a user interface at https://globalfungi.com . The GlobalFungi database contains over 600 million observations of fungal sequences across > 17 000 samples with geographical locations and additional metadata contained in 178 original studies with millions of unique nucleotide sequences (sequence variants) of the fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 representing fungal species and genera. The study represents the most comprehensive atlas of global fungal distribution, and it is framed in such a way that third-party data addition is possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0567-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359306PMC
July 2020

A meta-analysis of global fungal distribution reveals climate-driven patterns.

Nat Commun 2019 11 13;10(1):5142. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

The evolutionary and environmental factors that shape fungal biogeography are incompletely understood. Here, we assemble a large dataset consisting of previously generated mycobiome data linked to specific geographical locations across the world. We use this dataset to describe the distribution of fungal taxa and to look for correlations with different environmental factors such as climate, soil and vegetation variables. Our meta-study identifies climate as an important driver of different aspects of fungal biogeography, including the global distribution of common fungi as well as the composition and diversity of fungal communities. In our analysis, fungal diversity is concentrated at high latitudes, in contrast with the opposite pattern previously shown for plants and other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi appear to have narrower climatic tolerances than pathogenic fungi. We speculate that climate change could affect ecosystem functioning because of the narrow climatic tolerances of key fungal taxa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13164-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853883PMC
November 2019

Drivers of microbial community structure in forest soils.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 May 30;102(10):4331-4338. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Prague, Czech Republic.

Forests are essential biomes for global biogeochemical cycles, and belowground microorganisms have a key role in providing relevant ecosystem services. To predict the effects of environmental changes on these ecosystem services requires a comprehensive understanding of how biotic and abiotic factors drive the composition of microbial communities in soil. However, microorganisms are not homogeneously distributed in complex environments such as soil, with different features affecting microbes at different extent depending on the niche they occupy. Indeed, this spatial heterogeneity hampers the extrapolation of microbial diversity study results from particular habitats to the ecosystem level, even if the resolution of the more recent studies has increased significantly after the standardization of high-throughput sequencing techniques. The present work intends to give a comprehensive view of the knowledge accumulated until date defining the more important drivers determining the structure of forest soil microbial communities from fine to continental scales.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-018-8950-4DOI Listing
May 2018

Forest Soil Bacteria: Diversity, Involvement in Ecosystem Processes, and Response to Global Change.

Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 2017 06 12;81(2). Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Vestec, Czech Republic

The ecology of forest soils is an important field of research due to the role of forests as carbon sinks. Consequently, a significant amount of information has been accumulated concerning their ecology, especially for temperate and boreal forests. Although most studies have focused on fungi, forest soil bacteria also play important roles in this environment. In forest soils, bacteria inhabit multiple habitats with specific properties, including bulk soil, rhizosphere, litter, and deadwood habitats, where their communities are shaped by nutrient availability and biotic interactions. Bacteria contribute to a range of essential soil processes involved in the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. They take part in the decomposition of dead plant biomass and are highly important for the decomposition of dead fungal mycelia. In rhizospheres of forest trees, bacteria interact with plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi as commensalists or mycorrhiza helpers. Bacteria also mediate multiple critical steps in the nitrogen cycle, including N fixation. Bacterial communities in forest soils respond to the effects of global change, such as climate warming, increased levels of carbon dioxide, or anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. This response, however, often reflects the specificities of each studied forest ecosystem, and it is still impossible to fully incorporate bacteria into predictive models. The understanding of bacterial ecology in forest soils has advanced dramatically in recent years, but it is still incomplete. The exact extent of the contribution of bacteria to forest ecosystem processes will be recognized only in the future, when the activities of all soil community members are studied simultaneously.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MMBR.00063-16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5485800PMC
June 2017

Community-level physiological profiling analyses show potential to identify the copiotrophic bacteria present in soil environments.

PLoS One 2017 7;12(2):e0171638. Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Prague, Czech Republic.

Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) analyses from very diverse environments are frequently used with the aim of characterizing the metabolic versatility of whole environmental bacterial communities. While the limitations of the methodology for the characterization of whole communities are well known, we propose that CLPP combined with high-throughput sequencing and qPCR can be utilized to identify the copiotrophic, fast-growing fraction of the bacterial community of soil environments, where oligotrophic taxa are usually dominant. In the present work we have used this approach to analyze samples of litter and soil from a coniferous forest in the Czech Republic using BIOLOG GN2 plates. Monosaccharides and amino acids were utilized significantly faster than other C substrates, such as organic acids, in both litter and soil samples. Bacterial biodiversity in CLPP wells was significantly lower than in the original community, independently of the carbon source. Bacterial communities became highly enriched in taxa that typically showed low abundance in the original soil, belonging mostly to the Gammaproteobacteria and the genus Pseudomonas, indicating that the copiotrophic strains, favoured by the high nutrient content, are rare in forest litter and soil. In contrast, taxa abundant in the original samples were rarely found to grow at sufficient rates under the CLPP conditions. Our results show that CLPP is useful to detect copiotrophic bacteria from the soil environments and that bacterial growth is substrate specific.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0171638PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5295708PMC
August 2017

Comparative assessment of fungal augmentation treatments of a fine-textured and historically oil-contaminated soil.

Sci Total Environ 2016 Oct 21;566-567:250-259. Epub 2016 May 21.

Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food, and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy.

The removal of aged hydrophobic contaminants from fine-textured soils is a challenging issue in remediation. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of augmentation treatments to that of biostimulation in terms of total aliphatic hydrocarbon (TAH) and toxicity removal from a historically contaminated clay soil and to assess their impact on the resident microbial community. To this aim, Pleurotus ostreatus, Botryosphaeria rhodina and a combination of both were used as the inoculants while the addition of a sterilized lignocellulose mixture to soil (1:5, w/w) was used as a biostimulation approach. As opposed to the non-amended control soil, where no changes in TAH concentration and residual toxicity were observed after 60days, the activation of specialized bacteria was found in the biostimulated microcosms resulting in significant TAH removal (79.8%). The bacterial community structure in B. rhodina-augmented microcosms did not differ from the biostimulated microcosms due to the inability of the fungus to be retained within the resident microbiota. Best TAH removals were observed in microcosms inoculated with P. ostreatus alone (Po) and in binary consortium with B. rhodina (BC) (86.8 and 88.2%, respectively). In these microcosms, contaminant degradation exceeded their bioavailability thresholds determined by sequential supercritical CO2 extraction. Illumina metabarcoding of 16S rRNA gene showed that the augmentation with Po and BC led to lower relative abundances of Gram(+) taxa, Actinobacteria in particular, than those in biostimulated microcosms. Best detoxification, with respect to the non-amended incubation control, was found in Po microcosms where a drop in collembola mortality (from 90 to 22%) occurred. At the end of incubation, in both Po and BC, the relative abundances of P. ostreatus sequences were higher than 60% thus showing the suitability of this fungus in bioaugmentation-based remediation applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.018DOI Listing
October 2016

Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov. sp. nov., an acidobacterium isolated from coniferous soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park.

Syst Appl Microbiol 2016 Feb 18;39(1):14-9. Epub 2015 Dec 18.

Institute of Microbiology ASCR, Laboratory of Fungal Genetics and Metabolism, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

During the course of a study assessing the bacterial diversity of a coniferous forest soil (pH 3.8) in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we isolated strain S15(T) which corresponded to one of the most abundant soil OTUs. Strain S15(T) is represented by Gram-negative, motile, rod-like cells that are 0.3-0.5μm in diameter and 0.9-1.1μm in length. Its pH range for growth was 3-6, with optimal conditions found at approximately 4-5. It can grow at temperatures between 20°C and 28°C, with optimum growth at 22-24°C. Its respiratory quinone is MK-8, and its main fatty acid is iso-C15:0 (73.7%). The G+C DNA content was 58.2mol%. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S15(T) belongs to subdivision 1 of the phylum Acidobacteria, being affiliated to the cluster of Acidipila rosea AP8(T) and Acidobacterium capsulatum ATCC 51196(T). Analysis of the S15(T) genome revealed the presence of 404 genes that are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, which indicates the metabolic potential to degrade polysaccharides of plant and fungal origin. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain S15(T) represents a new genus and species within the family Acidobacteriaceae, for which the name Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain S15(T)=LMG 28607(T)=CECT 8790(T)).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.syapm.2015.12.005DOI Listing
February 2016

Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an Abundant and Active Forest Soil Acidobacterium Important in Organic Matter Transformation.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2016 01 6;82(2):560-9. Epub 2015 Nov 6.

Institute of Microbiology ASCR, Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Prague, Czech Republic

Understanding the activity of bacteria in coniferous forests is highly important, due to the role of these environments as a global carbon sink. In a study of the microbial biodiversity of montane coniferous forest soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we succeeded in isolating bacterial strain S55(T), which belongs to one of the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in active bacterial populations, according to the analysis of RNA-derived 16S rRNA amplicons. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the species most closely related to strain S55(T) include Bryocella elongata SN10(T) (95.4% identity), Acidicapsa ligni WH120(T) (95.2% identity), and Telmatobacter bradus TPB6017(T) (95.0% identity), revealing that strain S55(T) should be classified within the phylum Acidobacteria, subdivision 1. Strain S55(T) is a rod-like bacterium that grows at acidic pH (3 to 6). Its phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicate that strain S55(T) corresponds to a new genus within the phylum Acidobacteria; thus, we propose the name Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (strain S55(T) = NBRC 111238(T) = CECT 8791(T)). This strain produces extracellular enzymes implicated in the degradation of plant-derived biopolymers. Moreover, analysis of the genome sequence of strain S55(T) also reveals the presence of enzymatic machinery required for organic matter decomposition. Soil metatranscriptomic analyses found 132 genes from strain S55(T) being expressed in the forest soil, especially during winter. Our results suggest an important contribution of T. gabretensis S55(T) in the carbon cycle in the Picea abies coniferous forest.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03353-15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711116PMC
January 2016

Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a Potential Plant Growth Promoter Isolated from Coniferous Forest Soil in the Czech Republic.

Genome Announc 2014 Aug 14;2(4). Epub 2014 Aug 14.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., Praha, Czech Republic.

Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biological control of plant diseases, and green remediation technologies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00810-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4132624PMC
August 2014

Microbial populations related to PAH biodegradation in an aged biostimulated creosote-contaminated soil.

Biodegradation 2009 Sep 21;20(5):593-601. Epub 2009 Jan 21.

Department of Microbiology, University of Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028, Barcelona, Spain.

A previous bioremediation survey on a creosote-contaminated soil showed that aeration and optimal humidity promoted depletion of three-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but residual concentrations of four-ringed benzo(a)anthracene (B(a)A) and chrysene (Chry) remained. In order to explain the lack of further degradation of heavier PAHs such as four-ringed PAHs and to analyze the microbial population responsible for PAH biodegradation, a chemical and microbial molecular approach was used. Using a slurry incubation strategy, soil in liquid mineral medium with and without additional B(a)A and Chry was found to contain a powerful PAH-degrading microbial community that eliminated 89% and 53% of the added B(a)A and Chry, respectively. It is hypothesized that the lack of PAH bioavailability hampered their further biodegradation in the unspiked soil. According to the results of the culture-dependent and independent techniques Mycobacterium parmense, Pseudomonas mexicana, and Sphingobacterials group could control B(a)A and Chry degradation in combination with several microorganisms with secondary metabolic activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10532-009-9247-1DOI Listing
September 2009