Publications by authors named "Salman Asghar"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The influence of social context on the perception of assistive technology: using a semantic differential scale to compare young adults' views from the United Kingdom and Pakistan.

Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol 2020 07 25;15(5):563-576. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

School of the Arts English and Drama, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.

A Society's view of disability may influence the perception and use of Assistive Technology (AT) products. Semantic cues or cultural coding provide the viewer with a series of visual stimuli to be given or ascribed meaning. Previous research has shown cognitive approaches to visual perception and assignment of meaning vary between diverse cultures. This study reviews the influence of contextual settings on perception, to provide the basis for a debate on the societal perception of communicative content (semantic/meaning) of an AT product; and, the relevance of different cultural cognitive styles. The paper explores, from a cultural viewpoint, the overall understanding of disability internationally. A Semantic Differential (SD) scale was used to obtain views on the image of an attendant wheelchair from nine hundred and ninety-one (991) young adults from the United Kingdom (UK) and Pakistan (PAK), reflecting the individualist and collectivist societies, respectively. This survey follows a previous paper-based study using the same image and protocol. Comparing the two surveys, a consensus of views from the two groups was achieved. The responses from the UK group were skewed towards a negative view of disability compared to the Pakistan group. This inferred greater social stigma associated with this AT product in the UK. The combined findings from both surveys provide insights into societal perception of AT products and disability. Areas for future research are suggested, including what visual components of an AT product (graphemes) appear to be associated with positive or negative responses for collectivist and individual societal groups.Implications for rehabilitationAssistive Technology (AT) product designers, academics, professionals and stakeholders need to be aware of challenges which are originated from one's socio-cultural environment. AT products convey certain meanings, semantics, which are interpreted by the society and are subjective to a specific cultural setting.•For the effective communication of meanings and values an AT product relies on the visual clues and design features embedded within the design. However, there have been a limited number of studies reviewing this aspect of product semantics.•The survey and associated testing has highlighted the differences in cultural perception towards AT products and demonstrated the importance of effectively designing the semantic attributes of an AT product as well as its function.•The demonstration of the efficacy of methods within the study for exploring the interpretation of semantic attributes of AT products will help designers and developers better understand the perceptions of individual cultures and societal groups.•A better understanding of different cultures and societies will enable designers and clinicians who specify AT products to reduce AT product abandonment; and, the associated stigma around disability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17483107.2019.1646819DOI Listing
July 2020

Cultural influences on perception of disability and disabled people: a comparison of opinions from students in the United Kingdom (UK) Pakistan (PAK) about a generic wheelchair using a semantic differential scale.

Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol 2020 04 19;15(3):292-304. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

School of the Arts English and Drama, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK.

Assistive Technology (AT) product use occurs within a socio-cultural setting. The growth internationally in the AT product market suggests that designers need to be aware of the influences that diverse cultures may have on the societal perception of an AT product through its semantic attributes. The study aimed to evaluate the visual interaction with an AT product by young adults from Pakistan, a collectivist society, and the United Kingdom (UK), an individualist society. A paper-based questionnaire survey was carried out with 281 first-year undergraduate students from the UK and Pakistan to evaluate their perception towards the visual representation of a generic conventional wheelchair image. A semantics differential (SD) scale method was used involving a seven-point bipolar SD scale incorporating sixteen pairs of adjectives defining functional, meaning, and usability attributes of the product. The mean (M) and standard deviation (sd) values were obtained for each pair of adjectives and compared between both groups by employing appropriate parametric tests. The results show that having a diverse cultural background did not appear to have overtly influenced the meanings ascribed to the generic manual wheelchair, which was unexpected. The University 'Internationalist' environment may have influenced the results. Some minor but critical differences were found for some pairs of adjectives (bulky-compact, heavy-light), having -value less than .05 ( < .05) that related to previous experience of wheelchairs and/or their use. Further studies are planned to investigate and validate outcomes with other student and non-student groups.Implications for RehabilitationThe semantic attributes of assistive technologies highlight a number of aspects that have implications for those involved in Assistive Technology (AT) product development, manufacturing and marketing.• For online sales, the AT products rely on the web page image to communicate the purpose and attributes of the product. There are limited explorations related to the semantic/communicative attributes of AT product presented in images, as perceived by individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds.• The knowledge towards semantic meaning ascribed to the AT product is important to investigate to provide a perspective that goes beyond practical functions of the AT product towards the communicative function.• Information of comprehending semantics and significance of the AT product from a social (non-users) viewpoint may benefits manufacturers in the development of AT products that best meet the societal needs, preferences and expectations.• A model of best practice, with a focus on semantic manipulation will offer Industrial Designers (ID) internationally with the suitable process and tools to reframe perceptions of disability and enhance acceptance of AT products not only for users, but also for the society around them.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17483107.2019.1568595DOI Listing
April 2020

Use of 'Trocar Site Closure Device' for Frontalis Brow Suspension.

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2018 Jun;28(6):S123-S124

Department of Ophthalmology, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan.

Ptosis correction by Fox Pentagon technique of frontalis brow suspension, using 'trocar site closure device' for placement of banked fascia lata is presented. The use of this device was found to be safe, secure, smooth, and stable. It has a gently tapered cutting upper edge and a blunt front, and is less traumatic as compared to the conventional Wright's fascia needle or the 18 gauge needle which are sharper and could cause an inadvertent and relatively more damage to the eyelids' delicate tissues. The surgery can be performed quickly with this single-use device and it provides a good grasp for holding the fascia lata during the manoeuvres, forming the desired pentagon.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.29271/jcpsp.2018.06.S123DOI Listing
June 2018

Peripheral ulcerative keratitis: Our challenging experience.

Saudi J Ophthalmol 2014 Jul 21;28(3):234-8. Epub 2013 Dec 21.

DOMS Resident Ophthalmologist, Hera General Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

A 52 year old male presented with peripheral ulcerative keratitis in the right eye. Patient's history included retinitis pigmentosa, pseudophakia (right eye), cataract (left eye), bilateral partial deafness, ischemic heart disease, hypertension, type 1 diabetes mellitus, depression, hyperparathyroidism, hypertriglycemia and renal failure. The patient was on weekly hemodialysis. The peripheral corneal ulceration remained stable until he developed sudden and rapid thinning after eight months of regular follow up and management. Laboratory investigations including immunological studies were negative and we had to rely on treatment based on clinical signs, including the visual acuity, size, depth and staining of the ulcer and perilimbal, episcleral, scleral, corneal and anterior chamber reactions. The patient was treated with medical and conservative approaches and the eye was protected with a plastic shield to avoid injury. Despite our efforts, the patient perforated his eye due to a trivial trauma during sleep. He was managed successfully with cyanoacrylate glue and a bandage contact lens. The anterior chamber reformed after the perforation was sealed and the patient is on a regular follow up with a multidisciplinary approach.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjopt.2013.12.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4181453PMC
July 2014

Nocardia canaliculitis presenting as pouted punctum.

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2008 Jan;18(1):55-7

Department of Ophthalmology, Combined Military Hospital, Gujranwala Cantt.

A rare case of culture-positive Nocardia canaliculitis is reported that presented with a history of chronic conjunctivitis and epiphora for the last 1.4 years, refractory to multiple treatment courses. Chronic conjunctivitis and a pouted punctum were observed in the right lower eyelid. Probing and sac syringing was performed. The "Sulfur granules" were expressed and subjected to various microbiological analyses. Nocardia sp was grown on culture. The patient was successfully managed with surgical removal of concretions and topical/systemic antibiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/01.2008/JCPSP.5557DOI Listing
January 2008