Publications by authors named "Salma Ahi"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Worldwide ACE (I/D) polymorphism may affect COVID-19 recovery rate: an ecological meta-regression.

Endocrine 2020 06 15;68(3):479-484. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Student Research Committee, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran.

With the emergence of the Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), researchers worldwide have started detecting the probable pathogenesis of the disease. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin-converting enzymes have received a good deal of attention as possible pathways involved in 2019-nCoV pathogenesis. As the experiments seeking to find potential medications acting on these pathways are being conducted in the early phases, having an ecological worldview on the relationship between the prevalence of COVID-19 disease and the genetic differences in the genes involved in the RAS system could be valuable for the field. In this regard, we conducted a meta-analysis study of the prevalence of ACE (I/D) genotype in countries most affected by the COVID-19. In the meta-analysis, 48,758 healthy subjects from 30 different countries were evaluated in 116 studies, using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis software. The I/D allele frequency ratio was pooled by a random-effect model. The COVID-19 prevalence data of death and recovery rates were evaluated as the latitudes for the meta-regression analysis. Our results demonstrated that with the increase of the I/D allele frequency ratio, the recovery rate significantly increased (point estimate: 0.48, CI 95%: 0.05-0.91, p = 0.027). However, there was no significant difference in the case of death rate (point estimate: 1.74, CI 95%: 4.5-1.04, p = 0.22). This ecological perspective coupled with many limitations does not provide a direct clinical relevance between the COVID-19 and RAS system, but it shows potential pathophysiological associations. Our results raise concerns about ethnic and genetic differences that could affect the effectiveness of the currently investigated RAS-associated medications in different regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12020-020-02381-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294766PMC
June 2020

Vitamin D deficiency in non-autoimmune hypothyroidism: a case-control study.

BMC Endocr Disord 2020 Mar 20;20(1):41. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Student Research Committee, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran.

Background: Although in many studies, the relationship between autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto) and Vitamin D deficiency was shown, no research has been performed on the role of vitamin D in non-autoimmune hypothyroidism.

Methods: This was a case-control study in Endocrinology clinic of Jahrom (south of Iran). The patients with Hashimoto (n = 633) and non-Hashimoto hypothyroidism (n = 305), along with a control group (n = 200) were evaluated. 25(OH) D level, T3 and T4 levels were studied and Anti TPO and Anti TG tests were performed. The results of vitamin D level were analyzed and interpreted using SPSS in terms of the cause of hypothyroidism (immune and non-immune).

Results: The results of the study showed a significantly lower level of vitamin D in both immune and non-immune Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in comparison to healthy controls (P < 0.05). We observed a significant inverse correlation between the vitamin D and TGAb level (p = 0.001, r = - 0.261) and a direct correlation of vitamin D with TSH level (p = 0.008, r = 0.108) in Hashimoto thyroiditis patients.

Conclusion: Finally, the results indicated that non-autoimmune hypothyroidism, as well as HT, is associated with vitamin D deficiency. The role of vitamin D deficiency in Hashimoto thyroiditis was thought to be in the association of higher autoantibody (TGAb) level; while, there should be further studies determining vitamin D deficiency's role in non-immune hypothyroidism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12902-020-0522-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082994PMC
March 2020

Trend of lipid and thyroid function tests in adults without overt thyroid diseases: A cohort from Tehran thyroid study.

PLoS One 2019 16;14(5):e0216389. Epub 2019 May 16.

Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Context: While the role of overt hypothyroidism in lipid disorders is clear, the association between dyslipidemia and subclinical thyroid diseases remains unclarified.

Objective: To examine lipid trends based on thyroid function over a 10-year period.

Design: This is a prospective population based cohort study.

Setting: General community.

Participants: 2383 euthyroid participants, as well as those with subclinical thyroid diseases, in all residents of district 13 of Tehran were examined. Subjects who were on levothyroxine, anti-hyperthyroid drugs, and glucocorticoids, those with a history of thyroid surgery or RAI and pregnant women were excluded.

Main Outcome Measures: Lipid trends in Model 1 were adjusted for age and follow up duration, and in Model 2 gender-specific multivariate adjustments were performed for thyroid status, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, education, BMI, lipid lowering medications, age and follow up duration by using generalized estimating equations.

Results: In every four years of assessments, there were significant decreases in levels of all lipid parameters (all Ps <0.001) except for HDL-C, in which a decrescendo-crescendo trend was observed. The results did not change after adjusting for thyroid status, consumption of lipid lowering drugs during the follow-up period, or other variables. There were significant decreases in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia (all Ps <0.001) during the follow-up period.

Conclusion: During a 10 year follow-up, decrescendo trends were observed in levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, which were not be accounted for by the consumption of lipid lowering drugs and thyroid status.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216389PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6522003PMC
January 2020

The Association Between Normal Range TSH and Lipid Profile.

Horm Metab Res 2017 Jun 8;49(6):424-429. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Dyslipidemia in thyroid dysfunction is mostly attributed to thyrotropin (TSH) levels, especially in subclinical disorders, but the exact role of TSH in dyslipidemia has not been explained. A total of 3 020 subjects who remained euthyroid in 3 phases of the Tehran Thyroid study were enrolled and divided according to quartiles of TSH as: Q1 (0.32-1.02), Q2 (1.02-1.53), Q3 (1.53-2.27), and Q4 (2.27-5.06). General Linear model was used to determine whether there was a significant correlation between subjects' lipid profile and quartiles of TSH from 1st to 2nd and from 1st to 3rd phase. Mean TC, LDL-C level and median TG were significantly higher for Q1 in all study phases. All lipid parameters of participants after 6 years (3rd phase study) except LDL-C were significantly varied in different TSH groups. Highest levels of TC, TG and HDL-C were observed in Q4. Thus, irrespective of TC and LDL-C in Q1 and Q4 (participants with the lowest and highest limit of TSH within the normal range), the difference in lipid parameters in middle of normal TSH range was not significant. Normal range TSH levels have a statistically significant effect on lipid profile, but the effect size is not clinically significant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-110142DOI Listing
June 2017

Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in rheumatoid arthritis: Regulatory effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells activation.

Int Immunopharmacol 2017 Jun 30;47:59-69. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

Department of Immunology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran.

Background And Objectives: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells with immunomodulatory properties. The mechanisms by which MSCs inhibit the proliferation of pro-inflammatory T cells have not been fully elucidated yet. It is assumed that pro-inflammatory T-cells play an important role in the development of autoimmune diseases. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of human adipose tissue derived (Ad)-MSCs on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy individuals, with a particular focus on Th17-associated cytokines.

Materials And Methods: PBMCs from RA patients and healthy donors were co-cultured with Ad-MSCs and HeLa with or without Phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Finally, IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were determined by ELISA and quantitative real-time RT-PCR on co-culture supernatants and PBMCs, respectively.

Results: In co-culture interaction, Ad-MSCs inhibited IL-17 secretion by PBMCs compared to unstimulated PBMCs cultured alone. In addition, IL-21 expressions in PBMCs of the patient group, and IL-17 and IL-21 in healthy group were inhibited by Ad-MSCs compared to PBMCs cultured alone. TGF-β expression in healthy individuals remarkably increased in both MSC-treated groups with and without PHA in comparison to PHA-stimulated and -unstimulated PBMCs.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that human Ad-MSCs act as key regulators of immune tolerance by inhibiting the inflammation. Therefore, they can be attractive candidates for immunomodulatory cell-based therapy in RA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2017.03.016DOI Listing
June 2017

A bulking agent may lead to adrenal insufficiency crisis: a case report.

Acta Med Iran 2011 ;49(10):688-9

Department of Internal Medicine, Rasul Akram Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran.

Adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening disorder which must be treated with glucocorticoid replacement and needs permanent dose adjustment during patient's different somatic situations. Insufficient glucocorticoid doses result in adrenal crisis and must be treated with intravenous hydrocortisone. The patient was known with Adrenal insufficiency and was treated optimally with fludrocortisone and prednisolone since seven years with no history of adrenal crisis. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weakness, fatigue and nausea developed 3-4 days after taking psyllium, a bulking agent, prescribed by a surgeon to diagnose anal fissure. Detailed medical history, physical examinations, laboratory and imaging examinations did not approve any other cause of adrenal crisis. Psyllium may interfere with gastrointestinal absorption of prednisolone and/or fludrocortisone and trigger acute adrenal crisis in patients with adrenal insufficiency.
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February 2012