Publications by authors named "Sadek Fournane"

5 Publications

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Deubiquitylase UCHL3 regulates bi-orientation and segregation of chromosomes during mitosis.

FASEB J 2020 09 1;34(9):12751-12767. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), Department of development and stem cells, Illkirch, France.

Equal segregation of chromosomes during mitosis ensures euploidy of daughter cells. Defects in this process may result in an imbalance in the chromosomal composition and cellular transformation. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic ubiquitylation pathways ensure directionality and fidelity of mitotic progression but specific mitotic functions of deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) remain less studied. Here we describe the role of the DUB ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L3 (UCHL3) in the regulation of chromosome bi-orientation and segregation during mitosis. Downregulation or inhibition of UCHL3 leads to chromosome alignment defects during metaphase. Frequent segregation errors during anaphase are also observed upon inactivation of UCHL3. Mechanistically, UCHL3 interacts with and deubiquitylates Aurora B, the catalytic subunit of chromosome passenger complex (CPC), known to be critically involved in the regulation of chromosome alignment and segregation. UCHL3 does not regulate protein levels of Aurora B or the binding of Aurora B to other CPC subunits. Instead, UCHL3 promotes localization of Aurora B to kinetochores, suggesting its role in the error correction mechanism monitoring bi-orientation of chromosomes during metaphase. Thus, UCHL3 contributes to the regulation of faithful genome segregation and maintenance of euploidy in human cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.202000769RDOI Listing
September 2020

Ubiquitin Receptor Protein UBASH3B Drives Aurora B Recruitment to Mitotic Microtubules.

Dev Cell 2016 Jan;36(1):63-78

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7104, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U964, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch, France. Electronic address:

Mitosis ensures equal segregation of the genome and is controlled by a variety of ubiquitylation signals on substrate proteins. However, it remains unexplored how the versatile ubiquitin code is read out during mitotic progression. Here, we identify the ubiquitin receptor protein UBASH3B as an important regulator of mitosis. UBASH3B interacts with ubiquitylated Aurora B, one of the main kinases regulating chromosome segregation, and controls its subcellular localization but not protein levels. UBASH3B is a limiting factor in this pathway and is sufficient to localize Aurora B to microtubules prior to anaphase. Importantly, targeting Aurora B to microtubules by UBASH3B is necessary for the timing and fidelity of chromosome segregation in human cells. Our findings uncover an important mechanism defining how ubiquitin attachment to a substrate protein is decoded during mitosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2015.12.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5400057PMC
January 2016

Decoding ubiquitin for mitosis.

Genes Cancer 2012 Nov;3(11-12):697-711

Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology (IGBMC), Illkirch, France.

Conjugation of ubiquitin (ubiquitination) to substrate proteins is a widespread modification that ensures fidelity of many cellular processes. During mitosis, different dynamic morphological transitions have to be coordinated in a temporal and spatial manner to allow for precise partitioning of the genetic material into two daughter cells, and ubiquitination of key mitotic factors is believed to provide both directionality and fidelity to this process. While directionality can be achieved by a proteolytic type of ubiquitination signal, the fidelity is often determined by various types of ubiquitin conjugation that does not target substrates for proteolysis by the proteasome. An additional level of complexity is provided by various ubiquitin-interacting proteins that act downstream of the ubiquitinated substrate and can serve as "decoders" for the ubiquitin signal. They may, specifically reverse ubiquitin attachment (deubiquitinating enzymes, DUBs) or, act as a receptor for transfer of the ubiquitinated substrate toward downstream signaling components and/or subcellular compartments (ubiquitin-binding proteins, UBPs). In this review, we aim at summarizing the knowledge and emerging concepts about the role of ubiquitin decoders, DUBs, and UBPs that contribute to faithful regulation of mitotic division.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1947601912473477DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3636754PMC
November 2012

Putting into practice domain-linear motif interaction predictions for exploration of protein networks.

PLoS One 2011 1;6(11):e25376. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Group Onco-Proteins, Institut de Recherche de l'Ecole de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, Illkirch, France.

PDZ domains recognise short sequence motifs at the extreme C-termini of proteins. A model based on microarray data has been recently published for predicting the binding preferences of PDZ domains to five residue long C-terminal sequences. Here we investigated the potential of this predictor for discovering novel protein interactions that involve PDZ domains. When tested on real negative data assembled from published literature, the predictor displayed a high false positive rate (FPR). We predicted and experimentally validated interactions between four PDZ domains derived from the human proteins MAGI1 and SCRIB and 19 peptides derived from human and viral C-termini of proteins. Measured binding intensities did not correlate with prediction scores, and the high FPR of the predictor was confirmed. Results indicate that limitations of the predictor may arise from an incomplete model definition and improper training of the model. Taking into account these limitations, we identified several novel putative interactions between PDZ domains of MAGI1 and SCRIB and the C-termini of the proteins FZD4, ARHGAP6, NET1, TANC1, GLUT7, MARCH3, MAS, ABC1, DLL1, TMEM215 and CYSLTR2. These proteins are localised to the membrane or suggested to act close to it and are often involved in G protein signalling. Furthermore, we showed that, while extension of minimal interacting domains or peptides toward tandem constructs or longer peptides never suppressed their ability to interact, the measured affinities and inferred specificity patterns often changed significantly. This suggests that if protein fragments interact, the full length proteins are also likely to interact, albeit possibly with altered affinities and specificities. Therefore, predictors dealing with protein fragments are promising tools for discovering protein interaction networks but their application to predict binding preferences within networks may be limited.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0025376PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3206016PMC
March 2012

Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding of high-risk mucosal HPV E6 oncoproteins to the PDZ1 domain of the tight junction protein MAGI-1.

J Mol Recognit 2011 Jul-Aug;24(4):511-23. Epub 2010 Sep 14.

Équipe Oncoprotéines, FRE 3211, Institut de Recherche de l'École de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, Boulevard Sébastien Brandt, BP 10413, 67412 Illkirch Cedex, France.

The E6 oncoproteins from high-risk mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) induce cervical cancer via two major activities, the binding and the degradation of the p53 protein and PDZ domain-containing proteins. Human MAGI-1 is a multi-PDZ domain protein implicated into protein complex assembly at cell-cell contacts. High-risk mucosal HPV E6 proteins interact with the PDZ1 domain of MAGI-1 via a C-terminal consensus binding motif. Here, we developed a medium throughput protocol to accurately measure by surface plasmon resonance affinity constants of protein domains binding to peptidic sequences produced as recombinant fusions to the glutathione-S-transferase (GST). This approach was applied to measure the binding of MAGI-1 PDZ1 to the C-termini of viral or cellular proteins. Both high-risk mucosal HPV E6 C-terminal peptides and cellular partners of MAGI-1 PDZ1 bind to MAGI-1 PDZ1 with comparable dissociation constants in the micromolar range. MAGI-1 PDZ1 shows a preference for C-termini with a valine at position 0 and a negative charge at position -3, confirming previous studies performed with HPV18 E6. A detailed combined analysis via site-directed mutagenesis of the HPV16 C-terminal peptide and PDZ1 indicated that interactions mediated by charged residues upstream the PDZ-binding motif strongly contribute to binding selectivity of this interaction. In addition, our work highlighted the K(499) residue of MAGI-1 as a novel determinant of binding specificity. Finally, we showed that MAGI-1 PDZ1 also binds to the C-termini of LPP and Tax proteins, which were already known to bind to PDZ proteins but not to MAGI-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmr.1056DOI Listing
September 2011